Australia tour of India 2017

Discussion in 'Match Archive' started by chandtara, Sep 19, 2017.

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  1. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Fixtures

    Sun Sep 17 (50 ovs) 13:30 local (08:00 GMT)
    1st ODI - India v Australia MA Chidambaram Stadium, Chepauk, Chennai LIVE D/N

    Thu Sep 21 (50 ovs) 13:30 local (08:00 GMT)
    2nd ODI - India v Australia Eden Gardens, Kolkata LIVE D/N

    Sun Sep 24 (50 ovs) 13:30 local (08:00 GMT)
    3rd ODI - India v Australia Holkar Cricket Stadium, Indore LIVE D/N

    Thu Sep 28 (50 ovs) 13:30 local (08:00 GMT)
    4th ODI - India v Australia M Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore LIVE D/N
    Sun Oct 1 (50 ovs) 13:30 local (08:00 GMT)

    5th ODI - India v Australia Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Jamtha, Nagpur LIVE D/N

    Sat Oct 7 (20 ovs) 19:00 local (13:30 GMT)
    1st T20I - India v Australia JSCA International Stadium Complex, Ranchi LIVE N

    Tue Oct 10 (20 ovs) 19:00 local (13:30 GMT)
    2nd T20I - India v Australia Barsapara Cricket Stadium, Guwahati LIVE N

    Fri Oct 13 (20 ovs) 19:00 local (13:30 GMT)
    3rd T20I - India v Australia Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium, Uppal, Hyderabad LIVE N
     
  2. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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  3. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Eden Gardens' preparation for second ODI hit by rain

    Wet weather in Kolkata has lent an element of uncertainty to only the second ODI between India and Australia at Eden Gardens since the TVS Cup final in 2003. There are concerns over whether the groundstaff have had adequate time to prepare the pitch amid persistent rain.

    There was a spell on Monday that resulted in the pitch being under covers in the afternoon and another on Tuesday morning, forcing the groundstaff to cover the entire outfield. The met department has predicted a possibility of more rain in the coming days.

    Eden Gardens' preparedness for rain has been under the scanner since a Twenty20 International between India and South Africa in October 2015 was abandoned without a ball bowled.

    At the time, the ground authorities had failed to clear the puddles caused by a 30-minute downpour that occurred five hours before the scheduled start. Then in an effort to ensure minimal delays, the groundstaff covered the entire playing area in the build-up to the World T20 clash between India and Pakistan last year. The ground's drainage system has been upgraded since.

    Sujan Mukherjee, the chief curator at Eden Gardens, has insisted that a sporting surface benefiting both batsmen and bowlers will be provided. Mukherjee's East Zone colleague Ashish Browmick, however, fears that the surface may not have enough pace in it if it remained under the covers for too long.

    Sourav Ganguly, the Cricket Association of Bengal president, was supervising work carried out by the groundstaff on Monday. A few days ago, he expressed full confidence that the rains wouldn't have undue effect on Thursday's second ODI.

    Since the pitch was re-laid ahead of the 2016-17 season, Eden Gardens has offered increased help for fast bowlers. There was remarkable seam movement for the white ball when England and India played each other in the most recent ODI at this ground. And yet that was a game where a total of 321 proved enough by only five runs.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/20750855/eden-gardens-preparation-second-odi-hit-rain
     
  4. Rhythm
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    Rhythm Cricistani

    Nov 27, 2014
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    Expecting a high scoring game but rain has likely dampened the pitch.
     
  5. Mohan
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    Mohan Formerly 'Captain Clutch'

    Nov 4, 2014
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    Not interested in these JAMODIS. Our real test will come in January when we travel to SA to play 4 test matches.
     
  6. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Rain threat looms large over Kolkata ODI

    A cyclonic circulation over the Bay of Bengal has increased the possibility of a second rain-hit game of the India-Australia One-Day International series. Heavy seasonal rains lashed Kolkata early on Tuesday (September 19) morning, forcing groundsmen to completely cover the Eden Gardens playing area. Work underway on the pitch thus had to be stopped in the face of persistent rain.

    The local meterological department has forecast more rain to hit the city in the next 24 hours, with intermittent rain predicted on Thursday evening. "By September 21 (match day), the circulation will be gone but in this month rain is a possibility especially in the evening. It may not however continue for too long," Kolkata Met Director Ganesh Das said.

    The Monday shower will once again throw into the spotlight, Eden Gardens' drainage facilities. In October 2015, an India-South Africa T20I at the venue was abandoned despite the rains relenting a full two and half hours before scheduled start of play. The Cricket Association of Bengal, under president Sourav Ganguly, has since used the 'hover cover' to shield the complete playing surface during rain. Coring, a process to alter the sand-clay ration, has reduced the once high water-retention capacity of the outfield. The changes allowed the possibility of a 18-overs-a-side contest between India and Pakistan at last year's World T20 despite a heavy downpour in the build up to the game.

    However, the implications of the rain on the pitch's characteristics remain to be seen. For the World T20 clash, the pitch turned significantly more than usual given it's otherwise transformed fast and bouncy nature. The early January 2017 ODI between India and England saw appreciable seam movement for the bowlers but also saw both teams notch over 300 in a closely-contested affair.

    Curator Sujan Mukherjee braved a flu to ensure the ground was covered and the pitch protected in the manner he sought. His desire for a sporting wicket to help both batsmen and bowlers may yet be beyond even his control. "I cannot say they will make how many runs but the wicket will help both batsmen and bowlers," he said.

    "The pitch and ground is fine but I cannot say whether it will rain or not. We are equipped to cover the entire ground and there is enough machinery to clear up even if it rains but it depends on the intensity and duration," he added.

    India cancelled their practice scheduled for Tuesday evening while Australia's batsmen, in need of a little fine-tuning after the loss in Chennai, opted for practice against net bowlers at the ground's indoor facilities.

    http://www.cricbuzz.com/cricket-new...cket-rain-threat-looms-large-over-kolkata-odi
     
  7. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Dhoni's wicket is the key: Zampa

    Australian leg-spinner Adam Zampa on Tuesday said the wicket of former India captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni is very crucial and they will try to get him out as early as possible when the two sides meet again for the second One-Day International (ODI) at the Eden Gardens here on Thursday.

    "MS is an important wicket and we need to get him early. We could not do that in the last game," Zampa told reporters two days ahead of the second rubber.

    Australia lost by 26 runs via Duckworth-Lewis method in the first game in Chennai, after India rode on Hardik Pandya's all-round brilliance to script a win.

    After guiding India to safety with a career-best 83 off 66 balls, the 23-year-old Pandya starred with the ball, picking the key wickets of Australia skipper Steve Smith and Travis Head to allow the hosts take 1-0 lead in the series.

    "MS has been there for a long time. The way he timed his innings, in his whole career that has been his strength. For a young player like Hardik he was the guide at the other end. It was important for us to break that partnership. We couldn't do that. We've spoken about hw important it is to strike against new batsman and we could not do that," the leg-spinner said.

    The 23-year-old Pandya meted out special treatment to Adam Zampa, taking the young leggie to the cleaners on three consecutive occasions to get to his third ODI fifty off 48 balls before falling to the same bowler, later in the innings.

    "It was important to get Hardik off strike and we couldn't do that. Poor execution from me, I bowled two balls that were too full. Hardik's a very good player.

    "Getting the length right out here is very important. The last day I could not execute the way I wanted to," Zampa said.

    The 25-year old vowed to fare better against Pandya the next time, adding the only way to get out of such a situation is by getting the player off strike or taking his wicket.

    "It was disappointing to get hit in one over like that. but then to get him out eventually did make a difference between 320 and 280. So I guess it's just how you get out of those situations. If it happens again, I will try and get him out and get out of the situation better," the Austalian said.

    "The most disappointing thing the other day was to get a team for 3 for nothing and then to allow them to get out of that hole. It was tough playing just 20 overs. The wicket was spinning a bit and it was hard to pick the wrist spinners at night.

    "The best thing during those situations (Hardik) is to take a deep breath and try and get that player off strike or take a wicket. That can be the difference between 20, 30, 40 runs we are chasing," he added.

    The Aussies started well the other day with Nathan Coulter-Nile and Pat Cummins shaving off the Indian top order. Zampa said the tourists' strength is their variety in the bowling attack.

    "We've got plenty of options. We have variety in our attack and we got quicks as well. They bowled very well to us. Particularly, when you are four down and they got two spinners who are very hard to pick. I think it could have been little bit different if it was a 50-over scenario. I think once it comes down to 20 overs it does become tough," Zampa said.

    https://www.khaleejtimes.com/sport/cricket/cricket-dhonis-wicket-is-the-key-zampa
     
  8. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Injury-prone Coulter-Nile keeps Test dream alive

    A dreadful run of injuries prompted Australia fast bowler Nathan Coulter-Nile to consider packing in first class cricket to become a Twenty20 gun-for-hire but after a welcome return to fitness the 29-year-old is now eyeing a Test berth.

    The Western Australian made an encouraging return in Australia's series-opening one-day international defeat by India in Chennai, tearing through the hosts' formidable top order to capture 3-44.

    It was Coulter-Nile's first taste of international cricket since playing the tri-series final in the Caribbean in June, with his entire home summer wiped out by a bone stress injury in his lower back.

    He was cut from the national contracts list in April and left wondering whether his Australia career was over.

    "There were definitely periods where I wondered if I was ever going to play for Australia again," Coulter-Nile told Cricket Australia's website (cricket.com.au).

    "I was always confident I could play for WA (Western Australia) and get through a domestic season.

    "That's a lot easier than the rigours and travel of playing for Australia. But it's yet to be seen if I can get through an Aussie tour yet.

    "I thought long and hard about (giving up first-class cricket) and I ended up trying to give it another crack.

    "After talking to (WA coach) JL (Justin Langer) and a few blokes, I think it'd just be mad to give up the dream at 29."

    Injuries have limited Coulter-Nile to 17 ODIs and the same number of T20 internationals and frustrated his few chances to break into Australia's formidable pace battery in Test cricket.

    His chance to bowl in India has only come through injuries to frontline seamers Mitchell Starc, Josh Hazlewood and James Pattinson, who are recovering for the home Ashes series starting in November.

    But Coulter-Nile is mindful how quickly fortunes can turn, having missed out on a Boxing Day Test debut in 2015 due to a dislocated shoulder.

    "I'm up near with them, but I'm not up with them," he said of Australia's first-choice pacemen Starc, Hazlewood, Pattinson and Pat Cummins.

    "But it's the nature of cricket that those blokes aren't fit all the time ... which is why I've got the chance here.

    "I've just got to be fit at the right time to get a break, I guess."

    https://www.khaleejtimes.com/sport/cricket/injury-prone-coulter-nile-keeps-test-dream-alive
     
  9. Rhythm
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    Rhythm Cricistani

    Nov 27, 2014
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    Do you have any hope?
     
  10. Mohan
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    Mohan Formerly 'Captain Clutch'

    Nov 4, 2014
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    We should win one test atleast I reckon.
     
  11. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Steve Smith defends captaincy ahead of 100th ODI

    On the eve of his 100th one-day international, Steve Smith has defended his captaincy after criticism from predecessor Michael Clarke.

    Smith will reach the milestone in tonight’s match against India in Kolkata where Australia will be desperate to level the series at 1-1.

    Clarke told Indian media Smith had erred in the opening match in Chennai by not bringing his strike bowlers back on when the home side were 5-87.

    “As a batsman, Steve Smith is right up there; I think he and Virat Kohli are the two best batsmen in the world right now,” Clarke said. “I think he and David Warner will be the highest scorers for Australia in this series. But I also think his captaincy is now being challenged.”

    Coming together with India in dire straits, MS Dhoni and Hardik Pandya took the game away from Australia with the first six overs of their partnership bowled by Marcus Stoinis, Adam Zampa and James Faulkner.

    Smith insisted he had gone for the jugular by bringing Nathan Coulter-Nile back into the attack to take a wicket.

    “I don’t think I’m in a bad place with my captaincy,” Smith said. “It was obviously a disappointing start to the series the other day but we’ve got another game tomorrow to try and turn things around.”

    Smith has evolved into one of the world’s most-destructive batsmen but said he was still learning the 50-over game.

    “I’ve been batting at No 3 (in ODIs) for a while now,” Smith said. “I had to find the right tempo of the game, whether it’s hitting fielders in the deep or knowing the right time to hit a boundary.”

    Smith counts his century against India in the 2015 World Cup semi-final as his most-memorable ODI innings.

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/spo...i/news-story/d0d02ef43de524e013c802f413b89798
     
  12. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Australia hope to bounce back on grassy pitch

    Big Picture
    In their last 10 completed ODIs on the road, Australia have won one game, against Ireland in September 2016. Never in their ODI history have Australia had a 10% win rate over a similar sample size. Where has it gone so wrong? With Tests preferred over bilateral ODI series, key personnel have consistently been rotated, and while it may keep the players fresh, it has had a regressing effect on the set-up of the team.

    Australia's troubles against spin were exacerbated in a 3-0 drubbing against Sri Lanka in the Tests in July 2016. In their subsequent Test series in India and Bangladesh, there were discernible signs of improvement, but they were by Australia's most technically efficient batsmen. For the ODIs, Australia have sacrificed technique for run-scoring ability, and that trade-off - whether apt or not - proved counter-productive in the first game in Chennai. Wristpinners Yuzvendra Chahal and Kuldeep Yadav exerted absolute control over Australia's batsmen apart from Glenn Maxwell.

    With their recent form, India were a confident team coming into this series. That morale may have climbed another level after they recovered from 11 for 3 to post 281, and subsequently defended a revised target of 163 with little trouble. In Hardik Pandya, India have found a fifth bowler who isn't a weak link and a No. 7 who has the maturity and arrogance to weather tough periods and then take on long, straight boundaries even with a trap set just for that.

    Form guide
    India WWWWW (last five completed matches, most recent first)
    Australia LLLLW

    In the spotlight
    Every ODI team, apart from Bangladesh, has a wristspinner in, or close to, their best XI. Playing wristspinners is advantageous not only because batsmen struggle to differentiate between their stock ball and their variations, but also due to the extra bounce that they generate, making the sweep a risky get-out-of-jail shot. That was evident when Chahal and Kuldeep ran through Australia's middle order in Chennai. Ahead of the series, captain Steven Smith said the surfaces wouldn't spin as much, which presents batsmen an arguably tougher challenge to preserve their wickets.

    Australia's genuine fast bowlers, Pat Cummins and Nathan Coulter-Nile, troubled India's top order with pace and lateral movement in Chennai. In the last ODI in Kolkata, England's seamers also enjoyed a rare quick surface. Coulter-Nile also has the experience of playing at Eden Gardens, having taken eight wickets in four IPL games at the venue for Kolkata Knight Riders.

    Team news
    India's only question lies in their middle order. Will they stick with Manish Pandey, who was dismissed for a two-ball duck in Chennai?

    India (probable): 1 Ajinkya Rahane, 2 Rohit Sharma, 3 Virat Kohli (capt), 4 Manish Pandey/KL Rahul, 5 Kedar Jadhav, 6 MS Dhoni (wk), 7 Hardik Pandya, 8 Bhuvneshwar Kumar, 9 Kuldeep Yadav, 10 Yuzvendra Chahal, 11 Jasprit Bumrah

    Australia's batting issues have caused them plenty of distress already. Debutant Hilton Cartwright, Travis Head, Marcus Stoinis and Matthew Wade failed miserably in Chennai. An alternative option is Peter Handscomb, who has shown he could be Australia's long-term No. 4 in Tests, and has the technique and ability to score quickly. Stoinis struggled to pick wristpin, but bowled tidily, which could help him retain his spot.

    Australia (probable): 1 David Warner, 2 Travis Head, 3 Steven Smith (capt), 4 Peter Handscomb, 5 Glenn Maxwell, 6 Marcus Stoinis, 7 Matthew Wade (wk), 8 James Faulkner, 9 Nathan Coulter-Nile, 10 Pat Cummins, 11 Adam Zampa

    hampered the preparation of the pitch, which has remained primarily under covers. There is a forecast for thunderstorms on Thursday afternoon.

    On the eve of the match, Smith noted that the pitch had a bit of grass on it, "probably more than I've seen in India for a while". This suggests it could play true to its recent reputation of aiding seam more than spin. Remember Royal Challengers Bangalore's 49 all out? The short boundaries, though, could level out the balance between bat and ball.


    Stats and trivia
    • Rohit Sharma has scored 794 runs at an average of 113.42 and a strike rate of 99.87 across formats (first-class, List A and T20) in his last nine innings at Eden Gardens.

    • In ODIs and T20Is, Hardik Pandya hits a six every 6.4 balls against spin, the best frequency for any batsman. Of his 19 sixes, 14 have been struck straight, in the arc between long-on and long-off

    • Seamers took 61 wickets at a strike rate of 16.4 in the previous IPL season in Kolkata, while spinners picked up 24 wickets at a strike rate of 23.

    • The average score in the last five ODIs at Eden Gardens is 311.
    Quotes
    "I don't think I'm in a bad place with my captaincy. Obviously results haven't been the way we would have liked and that's something we are trying to rectify."
    Steven Smith on his leadership

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/17974/preview/1119497/undefined
     
  13. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    India won the toss and elected to bat
     
  14. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Australia (Playing XI): David Warner, Hilton Cartwright, Steven Smith(c), Travis Head, Glenn Maxwell, Marcus Stoinis, Matthew Wade(w), Ashton Agar, Kane Richardson, Pat Cummins, Nathan Coulter-Nile

    India (Playing XI): Rohit Sharma, Ajinkya Rahane, Virat Kohli(c), Manish Pandey, Kedar Jadhav, MS Dhoni(w), Hardik Pandya, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Kuldeep Yadav, Yuzvendra Chahal, Jasprit Bumrah
     
  15. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Smith: Taken me 7 years to get there, excited to play my 100th at Eden. Would have batted first too. Hopefully we can bowl well early and put the pressure on. Two changes; Richardson in for Faulkner, and Agar in for Zampa.

    Kohli: We're going to bat. Looks a nice and hard wicket, doesn't have a lot of moisture in it. Tends to do a lot more in the night than the day and we have two wrist-spinners too. Was a lot of talk in last few months about the top order but middle and lower order have done the job for us in the last few games. Last game gave us confidence as a side and lifted us.
     
  16. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    "It looks like a very good pitch. Last season, the pitch had a two-pace quality to it. This one may not have that. Last few games over here have produced more than 300 runs. With the rains around, teams might want to field. Absolute beautiful pitch here at Eden Gardens," sum up Brett Lee and Sunil Gavaskar in the pitch report.
     
  17. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    India lose Sharma early.

    44/1 at the moment
     
  18. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Decent fight from the Aussies. India 208/6 after 41
    Kohli top scoring with 92
     
  19. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    India 252 all out. Decent effort from the Aussies. Coulter Nile and Richardson the pick of the bowlers with 3 wickets each
     
  20. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Aussies 1 down already, 2/1 after 3 overs. Kumar strikes, Cartwright gone
     
  21. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    85/3 after 17. This one could end up being a close one
     
  22. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Smith gone for 59. Is that the game?

    138/5

    115 still required
     
  23. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Aussies crumbling to spin - 172/8

    Kuldeep Yadav with a hat trick
     
  24. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Stoinis not going down without a fight

    57 required, 1 wicket in hand
     
  25. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    India win the 2nd ODI by 50 runs and go 2-0 up in the series
     
  26. ASLI-PATHAN
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    ASLI-PATHAN Cricistan Khan

    Apr 26, 2011
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    Stoinis looks a very good batsman.
     
  27. Mohan
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    Mohan Formerly 'Captain Clutch'

    Nov 4, 2014
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    Most batsmen look good against our so called attack.
     
  28. Mohammed Bilal
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    Mohammed Bilal Cricistani

    Jul 17, 2017
    490
     
  29. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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  30. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Dhawan not named in India's squad for last two ODIs

    Shikhar Dhawan will take no part in the ODI series against Australia after he was not named in India's squad for the last two ODIs. Dhawan was left out of the squad for the first three ODIs after being granted leave to take care of his wife, who was taken ill. The BCCI has not named a replacement.

    Axar Patel, who was left out of the squad after he had sprained his left ankle playing football during a training session ahead of the first ODI, regained his spot in India's 15-member squad. Axar's like-for-like replacement Ravindra Jadeja was excluded.

    Axar's recall is a reaffirmation of the selectors' inclination to give him a decent run in the spinning allrounder's slot ahead of Jadeja, who had an underwhelming Champions Trophy and went wicketless in the two games he played in West Indies. Meanwhile, Axar had a good outing in Sri Lanka finishing with six wickets in four games at an economy rate of 3.85.

    India took an unassailable lead in the series after beating Australia by five wickets in Indore. The next ODI in this series is on September 28 in Bengaluru.

    India squad: Virat Kohli (capt.), Rohit Sharma, KL Rahul, Manish Pandey, Kedar Jadhav, Ajinkya Rahane, MS Dhoni (wk), Hardik Pandya, Kuldeep Yadav, Yuzvendra Chahal, Jasprit Bumrah, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Umesh Yadav, Mohammed Shami, Axar Patel

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/20803810/dhawan-not-named-india-squad-last-two-odis
     
  31. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Ashton Agar to miss last two India ODIs with fractured finger

    Australia spinner Ashton Agar has been ruled out of the last two One-Day Internationals (ODIs) against India after fracturing his right little finger while fielding in the third ODI in Indore on Sunday (September 24). Agar now heads back to Australia and will consult a specialist to determine if he needs a surgery.

    Agar injured his finger while putting in a dive to stop a Rohit Sharma pull shot from reaching the boundary in the 17th over of India's chase (of 294). Agar couldn't succeed in denying India the four runs and ended up needing attention of the physio.

    At first it appeared like he sustained a dislocated finger, and was rushed back to the dressing room. He however, came back five overs later and bowled a three-over spell before getting off the field again. After another break, he returned and completed his quota of 10 overs, and yet the injury turned out to be series-ending for the tweaker.

    "Ashton injured his right little finger whilst fielding in the match last night. Following the conclusion of the match he went for x-rays which have confirmed a fracture of the finger. He will return home to Australia and consult a specialist with a possibility of surgery," Richard Saw, the Australian team doctor confirmed.

    Agar was on the bench for the first game of the series in Chennai, but replaced Adam Zampa for the second and third fixtures in Kolkata and Indore, where he picked up a wicket each. Zampa is now the likely replacement for Agar in the remaining two fixtures, first in Bangalore on September 28 and then in Ranchi on October 1.

    http://www.cricbuzz.com/cricket-new...y-news-fractured-finger-to-miss-last-two-odis
     
  32. Mohammed Bilal
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    Mohammed Bilal Cricistani

    Jul 17, 2017
    490
    India are just too good at the moment

    Pandya is one of those cricketers that performs bigger and better on the big stage and I bet when he finishes he will average about 40 with the bat and 30 with the ball.
     
  33. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Missed chances have cost Aussies: Finch

    Opener Aaron Finch says the Australian one-day side's current malaise is the toughest time he's experienced in the national set-up since he made his international debut almost five years ago.

    Finch, a World Cup winner who scored his eighth one-day international century on Sunday, has been a regular member of Australia's ODI XI since the start of 2013, missing just 20 of 103 matches since his debut and losing just 26 games, a win percentage of more than 61 per cent.

    Nine of those defeats have come in the past 12 months as part of a record-breaking losing streak away from home that has Australia facing the prospect of finishing this current series against India as the world's fourth-ranked side.


    A 0-5 series defeat in South Africa 12 months ago, a 0-2 series loss in New Zealand earlier this year and a winless Champions Trophy campaign in June has been followed by three consecutive losses here against India, who themselves are riding a nine-match winning streak.

    Finch, who was dropped for Australia’s 4-1 series win at home against Pakistan in January, has won just three of his past 14 ODIs in total and watched from the sidelines for a further two defeats to start this series before he recovered from a calf injury.

    And the experienced Victorian concedes his once dominant side are losing confidence as their winless run grows.

    "Whenever you're losing, it's never easy," he said after scoring 124 in Indore on Sunday.

    "Winning away from home is what every side strives to achieve and I think whenever you start losing, you can lose a little bit of confidence in yourself and in the way you're playing.

    "The couple of away series that we've played, in South Africa and India, we've lost the series against some quality sides.

    "You have to play well but I think you also have to go in with the right attitude and make sure that when you do get an opportunity to win a game, you don't let that slip.

    "We've been in a couple of good positions in the first few games and as soon as you give India a sniff, they'll beat you nine times out of 10."


    Finch crunches comeback century
    While still a dominant force at home having lost just six of 45 matches in the past five years, the Australians are currently getting a taste of their own medicine abroad.

    Having not lost more than four matches consecutively away from home in the past two decades, during which time they have been crowned world champions four times, a streak of 11 losses from 13 games (including two no results) represents an all-time low.

    "You have to play 100 per cent to beat (India) in these conditions," Finch said. "If you play 90 per cent, it's not good enough here.

    "It's how we've played for the past four or five years in our conditions. Teams have to be at their absolute best to beat us.

    "There's obviously a gap between the sides at the moment and they're proving that. They're 3-0 up, they're the No.1 side in the world and there's just a few things we need to tinker with as players to bridge that gap and get the results going our way."


    On a personal level, Finch has revealed he had to convince the team's medical staff to let him play in Indore having raced to overcome a calf problem he re-aggravated in Chennai 10 days ago.

    Having initially feared his tour was over when he injured his right calf in a training warm-up, Finch was put through a strenuous fitness test on Saturday, led by experienced physio Alex Kountouris.

    But the opener still had to talk his way back into the side.

    "I had to convince them to let me play, to be honest," he said with a smile. "If it had have gone again last night, I might have been in a bit of strife.

    "But the amount of work that I'd put into it and the amount of physio and rehab that I'd had, it gave me a lot of confidence that I'd get back and play and be 100 per cent fit. So it was nice for that to hold up."

    http://www.cricket.com.au/news/aaro...eak-indore-century-india-bengaluru/2017-09-25
     
  34. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    30,195
    Another ODI defeat to India confirms grim times for Australia

    These are grim times for the Australian cricket team. Grim times for coach and selectors. Grim times for the skipper. Grim times for Matthew Wade. Grim times for the batters. Grim times for the bowlers. Grim times for fans.

    Australia lost their third consecutive ODI match against India in the early hours of Monday morning. The side have not won a game in this format since Australia Day, against Pakistan.

    All clouds, of course, have a silver lining and it’s fortunate that much of the unsightly grimness is occurring off Broadway. To lose away, as the side did in the Indian Test series, the Champions Trophy, the first Test of the Bangladesh series and now the Indian ODI instalment, is something of a blessing. The lights aren’t as bright off Broadway.

    Should Australia continue this disturbing trend at home the levels of accountability will be raised immeasurably and immediately. Not only will the lights be more intense, the opposition will be England. It is for all but the most miserable-mouthed monarchist a matter of honour to ensure that the English do not reign over us in these matters. Independence and affairs of state are minor issues by comparison.

    Australia lost to Sri Lanka in an away series that shivered timbers late last year, but the response was nothing like what occurred when South Africa stomped their way through the Test series at home. That was a genuine capital “C” Crisis. Losing the Ashes in the same matter would be a capital “C” Crisis with an exclamation mark attached. Possibly two.

    Monday morning’s loss is part of an unhappy trend. Of the nine games Australia have played since the Australia Day win, they have lost six and three have been washed out. They lost 2-0 to New Zealand in the Chappell Hadlee series and lost against England in the only match they completed at the Champions Trophy, and now India.

    Twelve months ago they lost 5-0 to South Africa at home. Things have gone downhill since the World Cup was won in 2015.

    India are, to be fair, an outstanding ODI side, playing at home under an aggressive captain with little to fear. They have won their past nine consecutive ODI matches, their best-ever sequence, and have risen to No 1 in the format.

    The panic button has surely been fingered. Matthew Wade came into the series as the first-choice wicketkeeper but lasted just two matches. In the Indore game he was replaced by Peter Handscomb, a batsman and occasional gloveman. It was a desperate measure that suggests those behind the doors where selectors gather believe these are clearly desperate times.

    The move has decanted the worms from the can ahead of the Ashes. What happens now? Peter Nevill was replaced as Test keeper by Wade at the height of the crisis sparked by the loss to South Africa last summer. Wade passed 50 with the bat once in the 12 completed innings since. His batting form has been equally indifferent in the shorter format, the keeper failing to reach double figures in his past five innings.

    Darren Lehmann appeared to disparage the horses for courses policy after Bangladesh, suggesting instead that finding the right players and sticking with them in all conditions was the way forward but that is easier said than done.

    Adam Zampa was dropped after one game in this series and last night spinner Ashton Agar was sent home after breaking his right little finger in a fielding accident. But the bowling is the least of the problems.

    The good news in the third match was the return of Aaron Finch, who missed the opening two games with injury. The thickset Victorian didn’t miss a beat powering his way to a century.

    From 1-216 in the 36th over the Australians scored just three boundaries in the last 10 overs, limping to an anaemic 296. India too faltered but again proved they had more than enough talent to hold off a side that is making a habit of losing.

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/spo...a/news-story/4ff90e48b9f1a81cd221958a29762109
     
  35. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Kohli urges high-flying India to go for 5-0

    New Delhi: Captain Virat Kohli has called on his players to be “ruthless” after the crushing one-day series win over Australia took India top of the world one-day rankings to add to their number one Test status.

    A five-wicket win in the third game of the five-match series on Sunday gave India an unassailable 3-0 lead over Steve Smith’s Australia.

    It also stretched India’s winning streak to a record 12 matches across all formats.

    Kohli’s side have been on a roll for the past year since regaining the number one Test spot with a 3-0 home whitewash of New Zealand.

    The in-form captain has led from the front with 1,137 runs in 21 50-over matches this year, ahead South Africa’s Faf du Plessis as the highest one-day scorer in 2017.


    Kohli praised his team after the latest win against the once mighty Australians, who have been outplayed in India. Smith’s team also lost a Test series 2-1 in India this year.

    “Credit to the whole squad for the series win, but the journey stops only after the final game,” said Kohli, the top ODI and T20 batsman in the International Cricket Council (ICC) ratings.

    “We may give opportunities for people from now, but all 15 guys know that we got to be ruthless once we step onto the field,” Kohli added.

    The series has seen new Indian stars emerge, with all-rounder Hardik Pandya and left-arm wrist spinner Kuldeep Yadav making an instant impact.

    While Pandya’s crucial 78 led the team’s run chase in Indore, Yadav impressed with his maiden hat-trick in the second international.

    However, legendary spinner Bishan Singh Bedi believes India have not been tested by opposition teams, barring the Champions Trophy final in June against Pakistan which they lost by 180 runs.

    India won 10 of their 13 Tests on home soil in the 2016-17 season and then went on to rout hosts Sri Lanka over nine games in all three formats.

    “Realistically speaking Indians are not even fielding their best XI and beating the opposition hands down, whether it is Sri Lanka or Australia,” Bedi said.

    “We are loving the ratings, but if we are a little more pragmatic then you will realise that the Indian team in the last year or so haven’t been stretched by the opposition.

    “Just that one game in the Champions Trophy final against Pakistan, other than that we have not seen them in a tight situation.

    “We will get to know the character of the team when they come out of a tight situation,” Bedi added.

    Left-arm spinner Axar Patel returns to the Indian squad in place of Ravindra Jadeja for the final two ODIs that will be played in Bangalore and Nagpur on Thursday and Sunday.

    Patel, who sprained his ankle at the start of the series, will join Chahal and Yadav as the third spinner in the 15-man squad.

    http://gulfnews.com/sport/cricket/india/kohli-urges-high-flying-india-to-go-for-5-0-1.2095926
     
  36. chandtara
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    Jun 18, 2011
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    How India tamed the Maxwell monster

    Australia are 224 for 2 and in walks Glenn Maxwell. There are 12. 1 overs left for him to wreak havoc. This is the age of the 360-degree batsman and he is one of its vanguards. But it seems India have found a template to beat him, or at the very least keep him quiet.

    As soon as Maxwell comes to the crease, the ball is tossed to Jasprit Bumrah. Now this might just seem like a team demanding their best bowler to take a key wicket but there is a story here. For one, Bumrah has 24 balls remaining. And all of them are fairly precious to India because, since he made his debut in January 2016, he has taken 22 wickets in the last 10 overs of ODI innings while maintaining an economy rate of 6.5. He is arguably the most potent death bowler in the world.

    Bumrah is used for only one over - the 40th. It, he attempts the yorker and attacks the stumps, ensuring the batsman has very little room to work with. Additionally, with his unusual action and skid off the pitch, finding leverage to hit over the top is difficult. Maxwell manages only one run in five balls.

    India turn to Yuzvendra Chahal next and the legspinner ensures he keeps the ball away from Maxwell's reach. The battle begins with a loopy delivery, well wide of off stump, so wide that the batsman toe-ends it to long-off while playing with a horizontal bat. It ends with a stumping.

    This in essence is India's plan against a player who, if he gives himself a chance, could take batting to a level unimaginable.

    Maxwell has the daring to play a reverse-sweep first ball on a square turner against R Ashwin. And he has the skill to dismantle fast bowlers, playing shots they can't possibly budget for. In the 2015 World Cup, after Wahab Riaz had terrorised Shane Watson, Maxwell faced a short ball that was climbing on him and cramping him for room. He put it away to the point boundary with a shot he called "the back away, look away deliberate cut."

    Yet, on this tour, where Maxwell is perhaps third in command of the batting line up after Steven Smith and David Warner, he has made only 58 runs over three innings. Bumrah has come on early in his innings two out of three times and Chahal has dismissed him three out of three times. This is no coincidence, as the table below shows.

    Maxi's Twin Troubles
    Bowler Runs Balls Wickets
    Yuzvendra Chahal 28 36 5
    Jasprit Bumrah 27 33 4
    Maxwell is a fearsome ball-striker, if he can get under it, so India do their best to stop that happening by bringing on a seamer with an unusual action. Bumrah is difficult to line up, and lining a bowler up early is the absolute basis of power-hitting.

    Then comes the actual plan. Yorkers and bouncers, and he is adept at both. While training in Indore, Bumrah came off a short run-up and nailed a pair of boots placed in front of the stumps three straight times.

    Though his search for the blockhole manifests as full-tosses on matchday, they don't cost India much. Australia are in danger of slipping to a below-par total on a surface that will become better for strokeplay under lights, and against a batting line-up both long and power-packed.

    Maxwell feels that pressure. He knows he has to find release. And this is where Chahal comes in. The legspinner functions as bait. He targets the wide line outside off stump, because even if Maxwell is able to reach that far, he won't be able to time anything properly. That will add to his frustrations and eventually lead to a lapse in judgment.

    In Chennai, he was caught dragging the ball to long-on. In Kolkata and Indore, he was stumped running down the pitch too early. None of them were especially unplayable deliveries. But they became wicket-taking because Maxwell almost always goes for the high-risk shot, giving himself no second line of defence.

    Someone must have spotted that in the Indian camp. "Mahi (MS Dhoni) and [Virat] Kohli told me to bowl him a turning delivery and keep checking his feet," Chahal had said in Chennai. "So my idea was to bowl to him outside the off stump and if he hits it's fine but keep mixing it up.


    "The wicket was turning and if you want to pick a batsman like Maxwell then you have to get it to spin. The plan was to keep attacking but change the line. If he hits a good shot then it's fine but if he hits he should hit from outside the off stump because he is strong on the leg side."

    India play enough cricket against the Australians to pick up such cues. And that presents its own challenges in the modern era. These two teams have played ODIs against each other since 1980. That's 131 matches, but over half of those - 73 - have come since 2000. A bowler, in this age, gets plenty of chances to study his target. And this is without including the various T20 leagues, a profit-driven business where wins matter massively. Franchises pay plenty for analysts, demanding individual-specific strategies that could well change over by over.

    Surviving under such scrutiny requires a skill that can't be found in the coaching manual. But for Maxwell, the case might be the exact opposite. He has to find a way to weather the tactics used against him, at least initially. Take even India's ploy - making him play hide-and-seek with the ball only succeeds when he loses patience. If he doesn't, they have to move on to Plan B and that finding one may not be that straightforward a 360-degree batsman.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/20814305/how-india-tamed-maxwell-monster
     
  37. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Finisher Stoinis hopes for room at the top

    Australia allrounder Marcus Stoinis has played only six ODIs for Australia. However, in that short span, he has established a strange, little niche for himself.

    In Auckland, with the team 67 for 6 in the 19th over, chasing 287, he struck an unbeaten 146 to bring a dying game to a dramatic climax. New Zealand, however, won it by six runs, with the non-striker Josh Hazlewood - who scored no runs in a 54-run tenth-wicket partnership with Stoinis - being run-out at the non-strikers' end for backing up too far.

    Now, at another ground named Eden, he withstood India's wristspinners that have so often been Australia's downfall, scoring 62 off 65 balls in a manner that pleased his captain, on a night when it seemed like nothing could. Stoinis' composure and his all-round ability are firming his case to be part of the Ashes team.

    But back to his lone hands. There are a couple of reasons why Stoinis has been able to play them. One: he's originally a top-order batsman. He slots in at No. 3 for Victoria and it was from that position that he scored a 170 against Tasmania in his first full season of Sheffield Shield cricket. Two: he tries to dumb everything down.

    Andrew Tye has been added to Australia's squad for the T20s against India. He comes in to cover for the absence of Pat Cummins.

    Tye, a T20 specialist, featured in the last of his five T20s for Australia in February. He was sidelined after dislocating his shoulder during the IPL in April, and has not played any competitive cricket since.

    Australia and India will play three T20s, between October 7 and 13.

    "I'm still quite new to those sorts of situations," Stoinis said of having to marshall the tail. "I'm used to batting higher in the order in state cricket. But really, the only plan is to try and win the game. That's the way I'm going about it. Not try to win the game from the start, but trying to be there at the end, trying to take the game as deep as possible and trying to communicate with my partners and keeping it as simple as that"

    In New Zealand, armed with the knowledge of the short boundaries, he defended the good balls that came from Tim Southee and Trent Boult, regardless of how many they could manage. But the moment they strayed, Stoinis was launching them into the stands. He was 73 off 84, with Australia eight down and still needing 91 off 54. Nine sixes and three fours took him past a century and changed the equation to a mere seven off 19 balls. But, in the end, it was Kane Williamson, who pulled off the grandstand finish, as he had done in the 2015 World Cup.

    That he has been able to do well in such extreme circumstances has helped Stoinis feel like he belongs at this level. "I'm enjoying the pressure. I'm enjoying the opportunities, and I'm seeing them more as opportunities. I'm obviously still young in my international career but I think that's probably where my head is at the moment. I guess the pressure can get to you. But at the moment, the way I'm going about it is I'm enjoying the chance to be put under pressure and I'm enjoying the chance to do something good for the team."

    [​IMG]
    Marcus Stoinis charges down the track to hit a six AFP

    To ensure he has the best chance to do so, especially in subcontinentt conditions, Stoinis said he might have to adopt a Test-match frame of mind when he is new to the crease. "Even in the first game, which actually got moved down to a T20 sort of thing for us, it was a bit unrealisitic for me to go in there and try and hit the first couple of balls for boundaries when you don't know what the conditions are doing. You can see it on TV, but it's always very different once you go out there. So I just want to get an understanding of the conditions - sometimes it takes five balls, sometimes it takes 20."

    Australia looked rather upbeat in Bangalore, ahead of the fourth ODI, despite losing the one-day series to India only two nights ago. Just before training, they all got in a huddle and pulled out what looked like a giant die. They went around the group asking the players to throw it and when the number came up, there were loud whoops of laughter. Batsmen in the nets made it a point to clap when the spinners hit a length they struggled to hit, and fielders nailing a single stump from straight got a hero's welcome back to the queue before they went at it all over again.

    Stoinis, before heading out to join in these exercises, said Australia were still looking at the remaining two games as a way to build morale before a huge season back home. "They're probably pretty important, like you said, to play the Ashes. But, at the moment, [we are] not really thinking about that. [We have] two games left in the series and we've got a big chance to start some momentum for the summer and we're all just focusing on that as a team."

    After the tour of India, he is all set to go back home, to Western Australia, and resume his cricket. He had begun his career there, debuting at the age of 19, but couldn't find a permanent spot. Now, in his second coming, he is hoping things have changed.

    "Justin [Langer, the coach] and myself have spoken about it a little bit. Maybe we should've spoken about it a little bit more. But it would sort itself out. I know Justin really well and I think it'll be a good move for me. Obviously the main reason I'm going is for family, but that will sort itself out and hopefully anywhere in the top."

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/20822615/finisher-marcus-stoinis-hopes-room-top
     
  38. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    'Hardik has turned his career around' - Dravid

    Hardik Pandya has "turned his career around" by playing situations smartly, according to India A coach Rahul Dravid. It's a template he hopes players from the current India A set-up emulate.

    Last year, Dravid was Pandya's coach on an India A tour of Australia, where the allrounder first showed signs of being able to temper his naturally free-stroking approach when the situation demanded it. Since then, Pandya has continued to demonstrate this adaptability, most recently in the ongoing ODI series against Australia, where he has scored two match-winning half-centuries of varying moods.

    In the first ODI, he revived a floundering innings with MS Dhoni before launching into Australia's spinners to make a match-turning 83. In Indore on Sunday, he was sent up to No. 4 after the openers put on a century stand in a chase of 294. Pandya sustained the tempo while scoring 78, and fell with India only 10 short of their target.

    "A good example about Hardik from my perspective is, he's willing to play situations and not just the natural game we often speak about. Credit goes completely to him. He's the one who has actually turned his career around." Dravid said on Monday, on the sidelines of India A's unofficial Test against New Zealand A in Vijayawada. "It's not about playing just the one way you want to play.

    "If he bats at four, he bats in a particular way. If he bats at six, he bats in a particular way. Tomorrow, he may bat at 80 for 4, like he did in the first ODI with Dhoni. That shows maturity and that's what you want to see. This concept of 'play your natural game', which I hear all the time, frustrates me because there's no such thing in my belief as 'natural game.'

    "It's only about how you play different situations. Are you good enough to play when the score is 30 for 3, or 250 for 3? Are you good enough to bat when you go in first over or are you good enough to go in first ball after lunch? You have to learn to bat differently in different conditions, and if you can do that like Hardik is showing at the moment, those would be signs of a developing cricketer, someone who can make consistent contributions and not someone who is a one-off, who can produce brilliance once in a while. The aspiration and challenges set for a lot of India A players is to be all-weather players, all-situation players, all-condition players."

    Pandya's coming of age is an example of how exposure to the India Under-19 and India A teams, which Dravid has coached for over two years now, has helped players to make a smooth transition when called up to the senior team.

    Rishabh Pant is another player who has come through this pathway. The 19-year old who made his international debut earlier this year against England after graduating from the Under-19s in 2016, comes with the reputation of being a big hitter. However, his over-aggression has cut short a few of his promising innings.

    [​IMG]
    Rishabh Pant cuts the ball fine for a four Getty Images
    The first unofficial Test against New Zealand A was one such example. Pant, who had already hit nine fours and two sixes in his 67, seemed to be on course to make a hundred. Fields were spread out, runs were available if he just pushed the ball into the gaps, with the bowlers looking to get him off strike and target the lower order. But he fell trying to hit out.

    Dravid, who has worked with Pant for over two years now, said it was important to recognise the ability of certain players and allow them a learning environment that makes them comfortable while still holding them accountable.

    "I think it's a balance," Dravid said. "It's recognition of the fact that someone like Rishabh will always be an attacking player. You don't want to take away his attacking instincts, but you want to inculcate a certain sense of smartness to be able to read situations and recognise situations where the time is hot for you to make it count.


    "I think [in the first four-day game] he got stuck with the tailenders. Again, it is part of his learning experiences and that is the conversation I've had with him. When you're young, you think you have to hit every ball when a tailender is around you. It takes time and experience to learn [to bat] with the tail. That's what he is learning. It's not going to happen overnight.

    "Experiences like these are good for him even if it doesn't come off. If he goes back and thinks, 'were there any other options I could have used rather than the ones I took, that may have helped me play better?' he's an improved player. These are the chats we have. He's a talented kid and good at what he does; he has exceptional skill and exceptional ability. He'll learn with more opportunities, and more games. That's what these matches are about. I'm not too stressed about results. For me, it's about if they're learning from different situations."

    While looking to get players to feature regularly in A tours, Dravid also said it was important to not undervalue the Ranji Trophy. "The board has been open to scheduling series but it's difficult to balance out, especially the A tours become difficult because we do understand the stress players face with the amount of cricket played," he said. "They're required to play for their state associations, which we are conscious of. The last thing we want to do is pull them out of Ranji Trophy matches to play A series. I believe Ranji Trophy should be given as much importance, playing for states should be important."

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/20814950/hardik-pandya-turned-career-rahul-dravid
     
  39. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Tye to replace Cummins for T20s in India

    NEW DELHI: Australia have recalled pace bowler Andrew Tye to the squad for next month’s three-match Twenty20 International series against India, Cricket Australia said on Tuesday.

    Tye, who dislocated his shoulder playing for Gujarat Lions in the Indian Premier League in April, replaces Pat Cummins.

    The 30-year-old, who played the last of his five international T20s in February, joins fast bowlers Nathan Coulter-Nile, Kane Richardson and uncapped left-armer Jason Behrendorff in the squad.

    Cummins, who has suffered several injury setbacks in the past five years, has withdrawn himself from the T20 matches that follow the ongoing five-match ODI series, and will be heading home to freshen up for the Ashes series against England starting in November.

    The tourists, who have already conceded the ODI series after losing the first three matches, will look for a better result in the T20 games starting Oct 7 in Ranchi.

    Published in Dawn, September 27th, 2017

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1360209/tye-to-replace-cummins-for-t20s-in-india
     
  40. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    India eye record winning streak against wilting Australia

    Big picture
    New Zealand have done it once before. So have England. Pakistan, West Indies and Sri Lanka have each done it twice. South Africa have done it five times and Australia six. Bangladesh and Zimbabwe have never managed it. And, perhaps surprisingly, neither have India. What is "it", though? A winning stretch of at least 10 consecutive one-day internationals. And why is that relevant? Because India have now won their past nine ODIs on the trot. In Bengaluru, on Thursday, in what will be their 926th one-day international, they have the chance to accomplish a 10-game winning streak for the first time in their history of playing the format. An extra reason, perhaps, not to fall victim to dead-rubber syndrome.

    India have not lost an ODI since they succumbed to West Indies by 11 runs in Antigua in July; Australia have not won a one-day international since January 26, when they beat Pakistan in Adelaide on Australia Day. While India's form-line consists of nine straight wins, Australia have lost their past 11 ODIs away from home. They cannot rescue the series, but even a consolation victory or two would feel like an achievement at this point. Should they find themselves on the end of a clean-sweep, Australia could fall to fourth on the ODI rankings, to sit alongside their fifth ranking in Tests and seventh in T20Is.

    Form guide
    (last five completed matches, most recent first)

    India: WWWWW
    Australia: LLLLL

    In the spotlight
    Virat Kohli is one-day international cricket's Mr Consistent. In 2016, he scored 739 ODI runs from 739 balls. Incredibly, he has maintained that strike-rate of precisely 100 this year, too, having scored 1137 runs from 1137 balls in 2017. He is also the leading run-scorer in ODIs this year and has made a century in each of India's completed bilateral series in 2017. Can he add a hundred in this series to the list?

    The axing of Matthew Wade in Indore left the wicketkeeping duties in the hands of Peter Handscomb, who had performed the role in two previous ODIs for Australia. In domestic cricket, Handscomb has been a semi-regular wicketkeeper over the years, though in the longest format, he has tried to leave that role behind to focus on his batting. It will be interesting to see how the job affects his run-making in the following games, and it is worth noting that in the 23 List A matches where he has kept wicket, his average is higher (45.75) than in the 43 games he has played as a specialist batsman (30.15).

    Team news
    There is no real need for India to make any changes unless, with the series won, they want to rest someone. An unaltered XI seems likely.

    India (possible) 1 Ajinkya Rahane, 2 Rohit Sharma, 3 Virat Kohli (capt), 4 Manish Pandey, 5 Kedar Jadhav, 6 MS Dhoni (wk), 7 Hardik Pandya, 8 Bhuvneshwar Kumar, 9 Kuldeep Yadav, 10 Yuzvendra Chahal, 11 Jasprit Bumrah

    Ashton Agar has gone home injured, which will mean a recall for Adam Zampa. Pat Cummins will be rested from the upcoming T20Is and there is the possibility that with the series already lost, the selectors may wish to start his break even sooner, in which case they could bring James Faulkner back in.


    Australia (possible) 1 David Warner, 2 Aaron Finch, 3 Steven Smith (capt), 4 Glenn Maxwell, 5 Travis Head, 6 Marcus Stoinis, 7 Peter Handscomb (wk), 8 Pat Cummins/James Faulkner, 9 Nathan Coulter-Nile, 10 Kane Richardson, 11 Adam Zampa

    Pitch and conditions
    The Bengaluru pitch has become a little slower and trickier in recent times, but this will be the first ODI to be played at the venue in nearly four years, the last game having yielded a 57-run win for the hosts against Australia. It is, therefore, difficult to know precisely what to expect. There is the possibility of some stormy weather in the city on Thursday.

    Stats and trivia
    • The M Chinnaswamy Stadium is Kohli's worst home venue in ODIs: he averages 10.50 from four games there, with scores of 0, 8, 34 and 0.

    • This will be David Warner's 100th ODI, having made his international debut in the 50-over format in 2009

    • The most recent team to achieve 10 consecutive ODI wins was New Zealand, whose run ended in the 2015 World Cup final. The most recent 10-match undefeated stretch was, however, achieved by South Africa, whose winning stretch lasted 12 games, spanning September 2016 and Feb 2017.
     

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