Australia tour of India 2017

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  1. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Australia have won the toss and have opted to bat
     
  2. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Pitch Report: "This is as good a pitch as the one in Indore. There might be a few cracks but the ball will come on to the bat nicely. There might be hint of turn. It is a pitch that is hard," reckons Sunny G. "There has been a lot of talk of this being a new ball wicket, that it will carry through. With no dew and moisture below the surface, the brand new ball will fly through. We can see a couple of early wickets but as it goes on batting will be easier. 270-280 is a par total. This is a good surface," sums up Binga.
     
  3. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Kohli: It is much more dry than the last season of IPL (2016). Since then the game (T20) against England was also pretty much okay. It has to do with leveling the outfield and taking clay off the pitch that might have made the difference. The par score has come down to 143 from 190 in 20-over cricket. We would have batted first as well. However, I have played a lot here and the wicket tends to settle down under lights. I am sure the spinners will come into play in the first half. Every game is a motivation for us. When the series is done it is not the end of the road for us. We want to grab every opportunity as a team and the guys are hungry to perform. It is difficult to create good habits and even more difficult to follow. We have given few guys a rest: Kuldeep, Bhuvi and Bumrah are rested. Umesh, Shami and Axar come into the side.

    Smith: We are going to have a bat. The wicket has changed from the last time we were around. It will slow up as the game goes on. It has been a bit disappointing so far and we have to get back to winning ways. We have two changes. Wade and Zampa in.
     
  4. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    India (Playing XI): Ajinkya Rahane, Rohit Sharma, Virat Kohli(c), Hardik Pandya, Kedar Jadhav, Manish Pandey, MS Dhoni(w), Axar Patel, Umesh Yadav, Mohammed Shami, Yuzvendra Chahal

    Australia (Playing XI): David Warner, Aaron Finch, Steven Smith(c), Travis Head, Marcus Stoinis, Peter Handscomb, Matthew Wade(w), Pat Cummins, Nathan Coulter-Nile, Kane Richardson, Adam Zampa
     
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Disciplined Australia halt Indian juggernaut

    Australia 334 for 5 (Warner 124, Finch 94, Handscomb 43, Umesh 4-71) beat India 313 for 8 (Jadhav 67, Rohit 65, Rahane 53, Richardson 3-58) by 21 runs
    Scorecard and ball-by-ball details

    It is tough to imagine an Australian side of the old 3-0 down in a series after the dominant positions they got themselves into in the three preceding games. In failing to capitalise fully on a 231-run opening stand, they left themselves susceptible to a fourth such reversal, but better fielding than India and excellent bowling from their quicks made sure India's ODI juggernaut was halted at nine wins in a row, still their longest streak.

    David Warner scored a hundred in his 100th ODI, Aaron Finch biffed his way to 94 and to the top of the runs chart this series despite playing only two matches, but Australia managed just 102 runs in the last 15 overs, setting India 335. For a good part of the chase, India seemed on course to add to their record of five successful chases of 330 or more and Australia's unwanted record of eight unsuccessful defences of 330 or more, but their fielders and bowlers redeemed themselves on a damp outfield where it couldn't have been easy to grip the ball.

    The moment of magic came from the captain Steven Smith, who has so far had an ordinary series in the field, dropping two catches in Chennai and one in Indore. Two of those were crucial. In Bengaluru, he led by example at point in a match where India let quite a few slip through on a bumpy outfield that is dangerous to dive on. While India seemed cautious diving, Smith threw himself at everything. One of those balls was a Virat Kohli cut with India's two best ODI batsmen in the middle.

    Smith flew to his left at point. All of a sudden what seemed like at least a single caused panic. Kohli returned, oblivious that Rohit Sharma - on a sublime 65 at that point - kept running. It should have been Rohit's call anyway even though he would have been only just out had Smith hit the stumps at the striker's end direct. Smith missed, but both the batsmen were at the same end, and Australia had enough time to run Rohit out. Kohli was in no position to sacrifice his wicket for the set batsman because he had run past the wicket.

    To make it worse, Nathan Coulter-Nile returned to provide Kohli a replay of his Kolkata dismissal. Coulter-Nile went wide on the crease, bowled short of a length, asked Kohli to dab it to third man, but took the inside edge with the angle. India had slipped from 106 for 0 to 147 for 3, losing both half-centurions Ajinkya Rahane and Rohit. For the first time in a long time, India's middle order was going to be tested with the asking rate a worry.

    India responded by promoting Hardik Pandya again. Pandya responded with three sixes in a 40-ball innings, moving to No. 1 on the six-hitters' list this year, in under half the balls faced by the No. 2 on that list, Eoin Morgan. Adam Zampa had his own back after the Chennai mauling and two sixes on the night when he got Pandya out in the 38th over. Zampa bowled well to Pandya, not giving him the length he could hit straight. Pandya responded well with a pulled six and another over extra cover, but finally the short ball from Zampa got Pandya at long-off.

    It was, however, Pandya's partner in that 78-run stand that seemed to be India's man for the night. And afternoon. His low-arm action resembles a man bowling to under-10 kids in street cricket, but in international limited-overs cricket, India go to Kedar Jadhav only when all else has failed against big-hitting batsmen. As seen in the Champions Trophy, hardly ever does Jadhav's unusual bowling fail. He came on to bowl in the 31st over with no wicket taken, with two of cricket's biggest hitters looking to hit every ball big, and produced the wicket of Warner in a spell of 7-0-38-1.

    Umesh Yadav then removed Finch and Smith to expose the softer underbelly of Australia's batting. Three wickets fell for five runs, no boundary came in 50 balls, only 56 were in scored before the last five overs.

    Umesh had in part been responsible for the rollicking start. Mohammed Shami and Umesh, playing ahead of the rested Jasprit Bumrah and Bhuvneshwar Kumar, provided full balls far too often on a pitch that seemed difficult if the pace was taken off with the length on the shorter side. Finch began the aggression, but Warner caught up soon and then left his opening partner far behind. Both took full toll of all of India's specialist bowlers, including Axar Patel, replacing the rested left-arm wristspinner Kuldeep Yadav.

    Then Jadhav happened, giving himself a chance when his turn to bat came. Every time the asking rate crept towards or beyond eight in that partnership with Pandya, Jadhav would keep finding a way to hit a boundary. He managed the same later with Manish Pandey, but the turn available meant Smith could bowl 15 overs of spin, which was a bonus especially with Marcus Stoinis injured.

    Zampa began the 42nd over with a slight drizzle around. This was a crucial over because Australia's three big quicks could bowl out after that over. To add to the drama, the drizzle was deemed hard enough to take the players off after one ball, with India two runs behind the DLS par score. Teams came back on, Zampa's over went for 12, and Australia now had 75 to defend in eight overs of their three gun bowlers.

    Pandey sent Coulter-Nile back with a six over midwicket in the 43rd over, but Kane Richardson began to chip away at India. The 44th over was perfect for Australia: a slower yorker from deep inside Richardson's palm and five other singles meant India needed more than 10 an over in the last six.

    Pat Cummins followed it with an eight-run over, and that Richardson slower ball - no change in arm speed or release - got Jadhav caught at long-off. Out came MS Dhoni with 49 required off 26. Despite his important hands of late, this was Dhoni's test. Nobody has questioned Dhoni's calm and acumen, which has shown in his recent efforts, but it is when quick runs are needed that Dhoni struggled of late. Especially after Pandey's wicket early next over, it was all down to Dhoni.

    Dhoni showed a new side, in that he didn't take ones and twos to take the chase into the last over. He tried a big hit to almost every ball, managing to hit one six, but he played a damaging five dot balls before chopping on. The chase was over. Australia finally had smiles on their faces.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/17974/report/1119499/
     
  6. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    India pick Nehra, Karthik for Australia T20s; Dhawan back

    India have brought back veteran pace bowler Ashish Nehra for the three T20s against Australia which start on October 7. Another familiar face returning to the squad is wicketkeeper-batsman Dinesh Karthik. Shikhar Dhawan, who had been granted leave to skip the preceding ODIs against Australia to tend to his ill wife, returns for the T20s.

    Nehra last played an international in February, in the shortest format against the touring England side, before missing India's T20s against West Indies and Sri Lanka. Karthik had played against West Indies but missed the one-off game against Sri Lanka. The two men to miss out from that squad for Sri Lanka are fast bowler Shardul Thakur and batsman Ajinkya Rahane - though, perhaps, Rahane's omission is hardly a point of note given the last time he featured in India's T20 XI was in August last year.

    India's premier spinners in the Test format, R Ashwin and Ravindra Jadeja, do not feature in the squad. They had been rested for the Australia ODIs too, and though Jadeja was brought in when Axar Patel injured himself, he did not get a game in the series.

    India are coming off a 4-1 victory over Australia in those ODIs. The first T20 is in Ranchi, followed by games in Guwahati and Hyderabad to round-off Australia's limited-overs tour of India.

    Squad: Virat Kohli (capt), Rohit Sharma (vice-capt), Shikhar Dhawan, KL Rahul, Manish Pandey, Kedar Jadhav, Dinesh Karthik, MS Dhoni (wk), Hardik Pandya, Kuldeep Yadav, Yuzvendra Chahal, Jasprit Bumrah, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Ashish Nehra, Axar Patel
    In: Ashish Nehra, Dinesh Karthik, Shikhar Dhawan
    Out: Ajinkya Rahane, Shardul Thakur

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_...sh-karthik-australia-t20s-shikhar-dhawan-back
     
  8. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Missing pieces gradually fall into place for India

    India's dominance as a one-day team is well established by the fact that since their 2011 World Cup triumph, they have made it to the semi-final of an ICC tournament (World Cup and World T20) another five times in six tries. However, most of the time, the team was overextending itself.

    They had to rely on a fast bowler with a busted knee at the 2015 World Cup. The batting was overly dependent on the start their openers could provide. While oppositions had players with the ability to hit any part of the ground and the freedom to accelerate from the start, India often had to delay their onslaught. They had to account for bowlers who first needed at least a par score on the board, and then 20 or 30 extra just in case.

    Now, however, they have four quality seamers; last week one of them defended a total of 252. They have a street-smart legspinner and a left-arm wristspinner for shock and awe. They have a finisher who can hit sixes off the first ball. Now, they have resources.

    The punisher

    Since the mellowing of MS Dhoni, India have not had a six-hitter who can put so much pressure on an opposition that they fear his arrival. But that is slowly starting to change.

    "Against [Hardik] Pandya, who is a dangerous hitter, if you get it just a little bit wrong, he hits you out of the park," Australia's stand-in coach David Saker said in Bengaluru. "It's a learning curve for all of us bowling to him. He's a very good talent and he particularly likes to play against spin by the looks of things."

    The stats support that statement - 51 runs in 28 balls off Adam Zampa and 37 in 20 balls off Ashton Agar. Pandya has cleared the boundary 28 times in 14 innings this year; only Rohit Sharma has fared better. And only a year after his debut, he is among the top 25 six-hitters for India in 50-over cricket.

    His influence, and perhaps more belief in the squad at their disposal, has meant India's middle order is daring to score quicker. The strike-rates of Nos 4 through 7 have increased eight points, from 88 to 96, when comparing the two years leading up to the 2015 World Cup and the two years after it.

    India have the makings of a new finisher and, in theory, that allows a highly talented top order to take more risks, which means a batting line-up that is already known for making 300-plus can push the bar even higher. Or they can recover from dreadful situations. Pandya's 83 in Chennai led India to only their 13th victory in the 61 occasions they have found themselves five down for less than 90 against other top-nine nations.

    Yuzvendra Chahal and Kuldeep Yadav proved themselves more than capable against Australia.

    The advantage they offer was particularly apparent in Indore, when they yanked a score of 224 for 1 down to 243 for 4 between the 38th and 43rd overs. Aaron Finch was gone for 124, Steven Smith for 63 and Glenn Maxwell for 5 and Australia were forced to settle for a total of 294 when they looked good for 350.

    Clumps of wickets in the middle overs - the closer to the 40th the better - pushes a team to rebuild at exactly the time they need to launch. Wristspinners are well-placed to accomplish this and that applies all the more to Chahal and Kuldeep because they turn the ball both ways and can exploit the premeditation batsmen indulge in when they are desperate to score quickly. In Scooby Doo parlance, they're the new meddling kids.

    Since April 2015, the top four wicket-takers in overs 25 to 40 in ODis have been Adil Rashid, Imran Tahir, Graeme Cremer and Rashid Khan. Wristspinners all. India were late to realise this, but they're starting to make up lost ground.

    Bhuvneshwar Kumar and Jasprit Bumrah are the world's best at closing an innings out. And when their most recent performance ensured only 52 runs are conceded in the last 10 overs, taking five wickets, and bowling a maiden in the 45th, it is easy to see why Steven Smith said what he said.


    Since the end of the 2015 World Cup, India have taken 111 wickets between the 40th and 50th overs - only Australia have fared better. And since Bumrah's debut, he has both delivered the most balls (323) and taken the most wickets (26) in this period of play. Remarkably, he has kept an economy rate of 6.3.

    Bhuvneshwar, meanwhile, is starting to become the bowling leader. He takes the tough overs at the start, with only two fielders outside the circle, and then in the death overs, when he doesn't really have the advantage of express pace or a strange action. What he does possess is the skill to place the ball at more or less the area where the batsman doesn't want it. In the first ten overs, it's that in-between length that doesn't allow for the drive or the pull and in the last 10, it's yorkers.

    And when these frontline quicks are unavailable, Mohammed Shami and Umesh Yadav aren't half bad replacements. India have developed a reliable pool of bowlers - both spin and pace - to complement their traditional batting firepower. Now, for the next year and a half, it's all about gaining experience to stand up to the demands of a World Cup away from home.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/20892369/missing-pieces-gradually-fall-place-india
     
  9. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Smith looks to make amends in T-20 series

    Nagpur: Australia skipper Steve Smith has blamed his team’s poor decision making under pressure after their demoralising 4-1 loss to India in the One-day Internationals.

    The visitors suffered a seven-wicket thrashing in the final ODI in Nagpur on Sunday to slip to third in the world rankings. They started the series in second spot.

    The latest defeat was Australia’s 12th loss in their last 15 ODIs away from home — a worrying loss of form for the team just two months ahead of a home Ashes series against England.

    “We’re just not taking our words out in the middle and doing it with actions. We have glimpses of it and we play well in periods and then we just get ourselves in trouble,” Smith told reporters in Nagpur.

    “Probably from poor decision making under pressure, that’s what I probably put it down to. That’s something that we need to improve on because it’s not good enough.”


    Australia, who came to India off the back of a disappointing Test series in Bangladesh that ended 1-1, failed to capitalise on favourable positions throughout their four losses.

    The visitors allowed India to reach 281-7 after having them reeling at 87-5 in the first ODI. The Australian batsmen also faltered against India’s wrist spinners.

    “Probably lacking consistency with the bat I’d say I think we’re losing wickets in clumps very consistently and that’s not good enough,” said Smith.

    “We probably didn’t adapt as well as we would have liked.”

    Top Australian batsmen were guilty of not converting their starts into bigger scores, costing the visitors against a formidable Indian side.

    Smith’s own form with the bat was not up to his usual high standards in the five matches, scoring 142 runs with two half-centuries. David Warner and Aaron Finch were the only Australian batsmen to make centuries.

    “I wasn’t feeling great at the start of the series to be honest. I wasn’t holding the bat the way I would have liked to,” said Smith.

    “As the leader of the team it’s been disappointing but I guess sometimes that’s cricket. You have those periods where you’re not getting the scores you like.

    “It’s something hopefully I can turn around and hopefully contribute in the T20s.”

    Smith played his 100th ODI in the series, having made his debut back in 2010.

    Australia now head to Ranchi for the three-match Twenty20 series starting Saturday. The second and third T20s will be played on October 10 and 13 in Guwahati and Hyderabad.

    Meanwhile, India opener Shikhar Dhawan has made a comeback into the 15-man squad for the upcoming T20I series, the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) announced on Sunday

    http://gulfnews.com/sport/cricket/australia/smith-looks-to-make-amends-in-t-20-series-1.2099346
     
  10. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Never been bothered by criticism; Kohli, selectors know what I bring: Nehra

    Ashish Nehra has been around for a long time, long enough to know what works for him and his injury-prone body. Success, failures, accolades, pitchforks - the left-arm paceman isn't a stranger to any of it. Now in the final laps of a noteworthy career, Nehra projects the same kind of relaxed confidence he's always had.

    Nehra's inclusion in the Indian squad for the upcoming Australia T20Is surprised many, mostly because he is on the wrong end of his 30s and the next World T20 is a good three years away. He last donned the blue jersey in a T20I series earlier this year against England, before missing the one-off T20Is on the tours of West Indies and Sri Lanka respectively.

    Speaking to PTI about his selection, Nehra expressed satisfaction at making a comeback. Happily oblivious to what critics have to say, he indicated that the only opinion which matters is that of the captain and the dressing room.

    "Who isn't happy if he is playing for India? I have never been bothered by criticism. The Indian dressing room knows what I bring to the table. The skipper knows it, the selectors know it. If I am in the team, definitely, I must be contributing something," Nehra said on Monday (october 2).

    The mention of social media got the veteran player chuckling. "I don't even know what people say about me on Twitter. Now people may have a notion that since I am not visible on social media and now that I am in the team, where was I during the period. Well, I was religiously following my training schedule, working on my fitness, doing my bowling routines.

    "Things you actually do to make a comeback.

    "Oh yes, people didn't know where I was but skipper Virat Kohli and chairman of selectors MSK Prasad were well aware of what I was doing," Nehra said.

    At 38, Nehra is probably taking it one game at a time. He even says as much when asked about his goals.

    "At my age, you don't set long term goals. I have been selected to play three games for India. I will take one game at a time.

    "Waise bhi Ashish Nehra accha karega toh bhi news hai, accha nahi karega toh woh aur bhi badi news hain (If I do well, that's news, if I don't do well, that's even bigger news)," Nehra quips.

    He points to his longevity and how he's kept going forward all these years. Playing for India - even if it means only a few more matches - it is something he still cherishes.

    "Come February, 2018, I will complete 19 years in international cricket. Save myself and Harbhajan Singh, I don't think there is any player, who made their debuts under Mohammed Azharuddin. There has to be some kind of motivation that keeps a sportsman going," Nehra noted.

    "And this stage of my career, I don't need to play for money. I have had 12 surgeries. Ask any sportsman, what it takes to recover from one and here I have been under the knife 12 times.

    "Still in the morning, when I wake up, I am keen to go for training. That's the motivation."

    http://www.cricbuzz.com/cricket-new...a-india-vs-australia-t20i-series-cricket-news
     
  11. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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  12. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Kohli’s men eye series win against Australia at India’s newest cricket stadium in Guwahati

    [​IMG]
    Bird's eye view of ACA Stadium in Guwahati which will host the 2nd T20I between India and Australia on Tuesday (PTI)

    The ACA-Barsapara Stadium in Guwahati will be making its international debut with Tuesday's match

    Overwhelmingly dominant so far, India would be aiming to wrap up another series win when they take on a faltering Australia in the second Twenty20 International on Tuesday.

    The ACA-Barsapara Stadium will be making its international debut with Tuesday's match, adding to the growing list of cricket venues in the country.

    The India-Australia limited-overs series so far has been a one-sided a contest as Virat Kohli team effortlessly grabbed the ODI rubber 4-1.

    Extending the domination in the three-match T20I series, India routed Australia by nine wickets in the rain-hit opening match two days back in Ranchi to take a 1-0 lead.

    Their T20I rivalry is lopsided as India have won 10 and lost four out of the 14 matches played. The hosts have won seven matches in a row, and they have not lost to Australia in T20Is since September 28, 2012.

    The visitors will have to play out of their skins to arrest the slide and level the series ahead of the last T20I in Hyderabad on October 13.

    For that to happen, Australia will have to unravel the mystery of India's latest wrist spin duo of Kuldeep Yadav and Yuzvendra Chahal who have shared 16 wickets between them in four ODIs and one T20I.

    The duo has been the big difference between the two sides as Australia have failed to read their variations and looked inept in exploiting the conditions.

    It's surprising given that most of the Australian batsmen are familiar with the conditions here having played in the Indian Premier League.

    On the other hand, the Indian team members are complementing each other well, be it in batting or bowling.

    It was evident in Ranchi when Hardik Pandya and Jasprit Bumrah's giving of easy runs was easily arrested by Yadav and Chahal.

    Meanwhile, Indian opener Shikhar Dhawan returned to the team in Ranchi after opting out of the ODI series and it was pleasing to see him pick up the length early and play the pull shot. His easy comeback also means that the in-form Ajinkya Rahane's absence would not be missed.

    Dhawan and skipper Kohli steered the small chase in the first T20I and Australia would look to rock the top-order, including Rohit Sharma, who was the top run-getter in the ODI series.

    There may be some surprise element from the pitch which will be hosting its first international match.

    The ACA-Barsapara Stadium made headlines in the last Ranji season when Hyderabad bowled out Himachal Pradesh for 36, the fourth-lowest total in the Ranji Trophy since 2000.

    Teams for the second T20I
    India: Virat Kohli (c), Shikhar Dhawan, Rohit Sharma, Manish Pandey, MS Dhoni, Kedar Jadhav, Hardik Pandya, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Jasprit Bumrah, Kuldeep Yadav, Yuzvendra Chahal, Ashish Nehra, Dinesh Karthik, KL Rahul and Axar Patel.

    Australia: David Warner (c), Jason Behrendorff, Dan Christian, Nathan Coulter-Nile, Aaron Finch, Travis Head, Moises Henriques, Glenn Maxwell, Tim Paine, Kane Richardson, Adam Zampa, Marcus Stoinis, Andrew Tye.

    https://www.khaleejtimes.com/india-aim-to-clinch-t20-series-against-australia-in-guwahati
     
  13. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    India out to clinch series on Guwahati's T20I debut

    Australia may not have expected to turn up and blow India away across the limited-overs leg of their tour but, a month in, many of their worst fears for the tour have been realised. Not only are they struggling for confidence having won just a solitary international game, they've had to ship out talisman and leader Steven Smith with a shoulder issue with a little over a month to go for the Ashes.

    On evidence of their performance in Ranchi, the T20Is don't promise much but, as is always the case in life and sports, there remains a little chasm of opportunity to unearth a silver lining out of this largely forgettable tour. Maybe a shift in setting will do them good. India's ostensible home advantage may be diminished slightly at the new Barsapara Stadium in the country's north-east. The venue's international debut may start both teams on a slightly even keel with regards to familiarity with on-field conditions.

    Then there's the T20 format, which often bridges gaps in quality between teams. It is no surprise that when the first T20I was further shortened to a six-over chase, Australia came closest to claiming an unlikely victory. But India barely rode out of second gear on Saturday and still made their visitors look pedestrian. In what is slowly becoming a pattern under Virat Kohli, this empowerment of bowlers to setup wins has opened up a new dimension to their cricket.

    In Bumrah, Bhuvneshwar, Kuldeep and Chahal - the hosts have four very shrewd operators to get 16 overs out of. But Australia must believe they can still upset the apple-cart and keep the series alive, if they play the percentages well and milk the fifth bowler tactfully. That could make India veer away from their patterns and take this matchup to a new avenue.

    Given how Australia have batted on the tour and in the last game, it is hard to imagine that they are in possession of the top-two individual scores (Aaron Finch 156, Glenn Maxwell 145*) and two of the top-three totals in T20I history. It is perhaps time to set out and regain some of the lost reputation, to prove they are still very much a force in the 20-overs format.

    When: India vs Australia, 2nd T20I, October 10, 19:00 IST; 13:30 GMT

    Where: ACA Barsapara Cricket Stadium, Guwahati

    What to expect: Spinners have had much more success at this venue than the pacers, including three of the best four bowling figures in first class cricket. However, seamers like Mohit Sharma and Basil Thampi had particularly noteworthy games in last year's Ranji Trophy. The curator Mukut Kalita is hopeful his surface will have something for everyone on its international debut. Guwahati experienced rains in the afternoon on the eve of the match but the ground's drainage facility, touted to be one of the best in the country, should ensure not much of play is lost in the event of an interruption.

    Team News:

    India


    With another series on the line, India are likely to resist making any change. The hosts barely got an opportunity to assess their batting, which may still lack a little 'x-factor' to keep pace with the likes of West Indies and England in T20 format. While the composition of batsmen may not be changed, they might consider adding a little insurance for their fifth bowler - Hardik Pandya - by bringing in now-T20 specialist Ashish Nehra or an additional spinner (Axar Patel). Hardik recovered well after conceding 23 in his first two overs, but on a more benign surface, India's bowling line-up could get found out.

    Probable XI: Rohit Sharma, Shikhar Dhawan, Virat Kohli(c), Manish Pandey, Kedar Jadhav, Hardik Pandya, MS Dhoni(wk), Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Kuldeep Yadav, Jasprit Bumrah, Yuzvendra Chahal.

    Australia

    One of the perks of naming a 13-man squad is that there is only so much to do in the name of personnel tinkering. Marcus Stoinis (Steve Smith's replacement) was just scheduled to fly all the way back to India only two days out from the game, but given his show of promise against the spinning ball in the ODIs, could be drafted straight into the XI. Australia understand that the demands of a No.3 batsman will alternate between attack and consolidation but appear to be willing to give the misfiring Glenn Maxwell a longer rope in the T20 format in the hope that the Victorian can shake off his Chahal hoodoo and find the enterprise of old. The visitors are also impressed by what Jason Behrendorff, the left-armer, can bring to the table and hope to uncover his full potential in a non-shortened game.

    Probable XI: David Warner(c), Aaron Finch, Glenn Maxwell, Travis Head, Moises Henriques/Marcus Stoinis, Daniel Christian, Tim Paine(wk), Nathan Coulter-Nile, Jason Behrendorff, Andrew Tye, Adam Zampa

    Did you know?

    - The Barsapara Stadium in Guwahati will be the 49th Indian venue to host an international match.

    - India have beaten Australia in seven matches in a row now. Only one team has had a longer winning streak against a particular opponent - Pakistan have won all their nine T20I encounters against Zimbabwe.

    - In the six matches they've played against each other in 2017 across formats, Yuzuvendra Chahal has dismissed Glenn Maxwell on five occasions.

    What they said:

    "It's very important to keep talking to senior players. These guys have played so much cricket. They're legends in their field. If you gain even some experience, then your career will benefit."

    - Kuldeep Yadav on the influence of two Australians, Shane Warne and Brad Hogg, on his development.

    "I wouldn't say I'm short of confidence. I think the pressure on you amplifies a little bit to get more runs when you are out of form"

    - Glenn Maxwell is confident of turning around his bad run of form.

    http://www.cricbuzz.com/cricket-news/97672/india-out-to-clinch-series-on-guwahatis-t20i-debut
     
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    Warner calls tails and Australia are bowling first. "It looks a good wicket, but at the end of the day you need to execute your skills," says David Warner. "The first game being played at this stadium, so looking forward to it and hopefully we can entertain this crowd. Marcus Stoinis replaces Dan Christian."

    "The only thing was the dew factor, to bat in the second innings, we would have done the same thing," says Virat Kohli. "But now that we're batting, we need to put good runs on the board. We need to repeat the good things every time we step on the field. It's very hard to create the momentum but very easy to lose it. Knowing how strong Australia can be, we need to bring our A-game. The stadium is beautiful. It's a packed house. Even when we were coming in, we were barely able to enter the stadium. That was the kind of crowd and enthusiasm. We are playing the same XI."
     
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    India lose Sharma and Kohli in the first over

    8/2
     
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    John Cena's 'a fair bit bigger than I am' - Behrendorff

    By the time Jason Behrendorff had finished shredding India's top order, the internet was going mental over his supposed likeness to WWE wrestler John Cena. And after Australia strolled to an eight-wicket win in the second T20I, Behrendorff was told of the comparison.

    He's "a fair bit bigger than I am," Behrendorff said as he burst out laughing, the mood set by his four-wicket haul that led to an Australian win in only his second international appearance.

    "It's an unbelievable feeling to be honest," he said, having dismissed Rohit Sharma, Virat Kohli, Manish Pandey and Shikhar Dhawan as his first four international wickets. "… to bowl four overs tonight and take four wickets, but mainly to get a win. To get the boys back up and about after a pretty tough time in the the one-dayers, it's very, very special."

    Just like he had in his only over in the first T20I in Ranchi, Behrendorff began his spell in Guwahati by conceding a boundary. But while he was wicketless on Saturday, he snared two in his first over on Tuesday.

    Behrendorff had Rohit lbw by bowling the quick inswinger, a method used by other left-arm quicks like Mohammad Amir against the batsman. The delivery also got Kohli two balls later, and Behrendorff said the plan was indeed to nip the ball into India's right-handers.

    "I was really happy with that," he said of his comeback, after being hit for two fours by Rohit in the first over. "Few ones that I got hit to the boundary probably weren't where I needed to be bowling. But then to get the ball up there, swinging the ball, hit guys on the pads and nick blokes off: those are the things we talk about in our meetings. To get the balls in those areas especially up front."

    While Australia's spearhead Mitchell Starc has been injured and out of international action since the Champions Trophy, Behrendorff looked forward to talking shop with his fellow left-arm quick. "I know Mitch reasonably well. I've spent a bit of time playing with him occasionally but mainly against him," he said. "He's someone that I feel I can talk to and get some advice off as well. He's a very, very good guy to have around."

    A look at Behrendorff's Linkedin profile indicates that he is a man of varied interests. He has a degree in exercise and sports science from the Edith Cowan University, and has interned with the strength and conditioning coach of the Australia men's hockey team. He also wants to improve his "presentation and interviewing skills" in the the media. Early evidence is that he's on track.

    "It's nice to have a bit of knowledge of what's going on," Behrendorff said of how his background in sports science helped him handle his injury-prone body. "I can talk to physios and doctors and understand exactly what's going on and what I need to do. To be honest, the main thing is doing the rehab and getting back on the park and now enjoying playing international cricket for the first time. It's something I've worked so hard for and I'm loving every minute of it."

    Behrendorff has a reputation of being a nice guy. The likeness apart, there's no - "You want some, come get some" - Cena trash talk.

    "You don't have to be mean and nasty all the time," Behrendorff said. "Generally I'd try and let my skills and the ball do the work and let that do the talking for me instead of getting into a verbal battle or anything like that. Some guys enjoy that and that's what fires them up and gets them going. But that's not really my style."

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/20986519/john-cena-fair-bit-bigger-behrendorff
     
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