ESPNcricinfo's dream teams for the last 25 years

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  1. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    The jury
    Ian Chappell, columnist, broadcaster and former Australia captain

    Sanjay Manjrekar, commentator and former India player

    John Wright, former New Zealand captain and former India coach

    Dav Whatmore, former Sri Lanka coach and former Australia player

    Mark Nicholas, broadcaster, columnist and former Hampshire captain

    Each selector sent in their XI, and a composite team was compiled from them. In instances where players were tied for a position, we requested a casting vote from a selector who hadn't in the first instance picked the players involved in the tie.

    The period under consideration is March 1, 1993 to December 31, 2017.

    The men's Test XI of the last 25 years

    Welcome to the first of ESPNcricinfo's dream teams for the last 25 years: magnificent teams of magnificent players whose careers overlap with the life of this website.

    Twenty-five years is about the length of a generation, and the riches of this one are revealed not just by the players selected but those left out. In the Test XI below, for example, no Sangakkara or Dravid, no KP or ABD, no Cook or either of the Smiths, no Ambrose or Donald or Pollock or Steyn or Kumble - and we already have something like a full squad although we are only just getting started.

    But what there is is amazing. This is a team that can stand tall against a fantasy XI from any other era in history. A batting line-up that can take you on from the top and never let go. A bowling attack that, other than by raw pace, can take you apart in every way conceivable. It is a team that can be as breathtakingly watchable as it can be ruthlessly efficient.

    The selection was surprisingly unanimous. As many as five from the XI were picked by all five selectors; another four received four votes each. There was just the one tie: for Virender Sehwag's opening partner, where Matthew Hayden muscled out Alastair Cook. [see sidebar for jury and method]

    Five Australians figure in the XI, as befits the champion team of the era, and they are joined by two Indians, a West Indian, a South African, a Pakistani and a Sri Lankan. Captaining this hypothetical team is a man who never led his country in a Test match.



    1. Matthew Hayden



    Big fella, big heart, big shots, big scores. Hayden's very physique intimidated opponents, and when he came down the track to a fast bowler it was the first sign of Australia exerting their domination. When Hayden scored a century, Australia rarely lost.

    Did you know? Only one batsman has more Test hundreds when opening the batting than Hayden's 30: Sunil Gavaskar, with 33.

    STATS
    8625 runs at 50.73 from 103 Tests (strike rate 60.10); Best: 380; 30 hundreds, 29 fifties




    2. Virender Sehwag



    An unreal strike rate even by modern standards - 82! - and seven runs short of becoming the only man in Test history to three triple-hundreds. Not only did Sehwag's batting create space for results in Test matches, it provided a new language for openers. Quite simply a phenomenon.

    Did you know? Sehwag is the record-holder for the fastest triple-hundred in terms of balls faced (278). He also features three times in the list of six fastest double-hundreds.

    STATS
    Batting: 8586 runs at 49.34 from 104 Tests (strike rate 82.23); Best: 319; 23 hundreds, 32 fifties
    Bowling: 40 wickets at 47.35 (strike rate 93.2); Best: 5 for 104; 1 five-for




    3. Ricky Ponting



    As captain Ponting led Australia to more Test victories than anyone else; as batsman he was forever setting the agenda from No. 3. He was flair and grit in equal measure, with a pull shot to watch on loop. On the hard, fast tracks of Australia and South Africa especially, few batsmen have been as relentless.

    Did you know? Ponting is the only batsman to score hundreds in each innings of his 100th Test.

    STATS
    13378 runs at 51.85 from 168 Tests (strike rate 58.72); Best: 257; 41 hundreds, 62 fifties




    4. Sachin Tendulkar



    The iconic cricketer of his generation was also its most prolific. Almost from the time he debuted at 16 (well before Cricinfo) until he retired at 40, India looked to Tendulkar for inspiration. The master rewarded them with an unprecedented number of runs and centuries scored in all conceivable conditions around the planet.

    Did you know? Tendulkar is the only batsman to score 10,000-plus Test runs from No. 4: he made 13,492 runs at an average of 54.40.

    STATS
    Batting: 14461 runs at 54.98 from 176 Tests (strike rate 54.78); Best: 248 not out; 46 hundreds, 61 fifties
    Bowling: 42 wickets at 55.76 (strike rate 92.9); Best: 3 for 10




    5. Brian Lara



    Opponents confess to tearing their hair out in frustration and simultaneously smiling with pleasure as Lara took them apart. He was 24 when he broke the world record for the highest Test score. A decade later he did it again. Some of Lara's most stirring innings came in West Indian defeat; others, magically, took them to victory against all odds.

    Did you know? Lara is one of only four batsmen to pass 300 twice in Tests; unlike him, none of the others - Bradman, Sehwag and Gayle - got to 400.

    STATS
    11357 runs at 53.07 from 124 Tests (strike rate 60.53); Best: 400 not out; 33 hundreds, 44 fifties






    [​IMG]
    © ESPNcricinfo Ltd

    6. Jacques Kallis



    Kallis crafted mountains of runs using a combination of indestructible technique and indestructible temperament, prised out near to 300 wickets with brisk seam and outswing, and pouched a phenomenal 200 catches, the majority of them in the slips. If there has ever been a more complete cricketer, his name must have been Sobers.

    Did you know? Kallis won 23 Man-of-the-Match awards, the most by any player in Test history; Muttiah Muralitharan is next with 19.

    STATS
    Batting: 13289 runs at 55.37 from 166 Tests (strike rate 45.97); Best: 224; 45 hundreds, 58 fifties
    Bowling: 292 wickets at 32.65 (strike rate 69.2); Best: 6 for 54; 5 five-fors




    7. Adam Gilchrist



    Test line-ups were never the same after Gilchrist. To keep wicket like him - superbly safe to wristspin, frequently acrobatic to the fast bowlers - was admirable. To bat like him - with thrilling freedom, at a strike rate topping 80 - was incredible. To do both was insane.

    Did you know? Gilchrist scored 13 Test hundreds when batting at No. 7 or lower; the next best at these positions is Kapil Dev, with seven.

    STATS
    Batting: 5570 runs at 47.60 from 96 Tests (strike rate 81.95)
    Keeping:
    379 catches, 37 stumpings




    8. Wasim Akram



    He made the ball swing, seam, sing, slither and scheme: rare is the batsman who has faced Akram and doesn't think that is the best he has ever faced. Although only about half of Akram's career fell in the period under consideration, there is little arguing his game-changing instincts and his sheer magic.

    Did you know? Akram is one of only four bowlers to take two Test hat-tricks; Hugh Trumble, TJ Matthews and Stuart Broad are the others.

    STATS
    Bowling: 237 wickets at 23.49 (strike rate 53.4) from 59 Tests; Best: 7 for 119; 13 five-fors, 3 ten-fors
    Batting: 1885 runs at 23.86 (strike rate 52.18); Best: 257 not out; 2 hundreds, 3 fifties


    Shane Warne (captain)



    Nobody spun the ball from leg to off quite like Warne, and few tangled batsmen's brains like him. He was also perhaps the most competitive cricketer of his era, with a nose for big moments and the killer instinct of a shark. Never appointed captain of Australia, here he takes charge of the world.

    Did you know? Warne's 96 Test wickets in 2005 are the most by any bowler in a calendar year; Murali is next, with 90 in 2006.

    STATS
    Bowling: 687 wickets at 25.05 (strike rate 56.9) from 136 Tests; Best: 8 for 71; 36 five-fours, 10 ten-fors
    Batting: 2996 runs at 17.72 (strike rate 59.70); Best: 99; 0 hundreds, 12 fifties






    10. Glenn McGrath





    With his acute control, steep bounce and lethal incutter, McGrath hounded and harrowed his way to more wickets than any other pace bowler in Test history. Full of sound principles and subtle adjustments, he was as much at home in India or England as in Australia. When McGrath bowled a bad ball - well, he didn't really.

    Did you know? McGrath averaged less than 28 against every opponent - his poorest average was 27.33 against South Africa.

    STATS
    563 wickets at 21.64 (strike rate 51.9) from 124 Tests; Best: 8 for 24; 29 five-fors, 3 ten-fors




    11. Muttiah Muralitharan



    When Murali began his Test career, the record for the most wickets was 431. Using his wickedly gargantuan offbreaks, and latterly a doosra that could put most legbreaks to shame, he himself signed off with an astonishing 800. To bowl more deliveries than anyone else in Test cricket was one thing; to do so with the constant and cruel scrutiny on his bowling action quite another.

    Did you know? Murali took 67 five-fors and 22 ten-fors in Tests. The next best in these categories are 37 and ten, by Warne.

    STATS
    789 wickets at 22.55 (strike rate 54.8) from 130 Tests; Best 9 for 51; 67 five-fors, 22 ten-fors


    *All statistics are for the period March 1, 1993 to December 31, 2017

    Readers' XI
    We polled ESPNcricinfo users in May, and their men's Test XI of the last 25 years is identical to the jury's:

    1. Matthew Hayden

    2. Virender Sehwag

    3. Ricky Ponting

    4. Sachin Tendulkar

    5. Brian Lara

    6. Jacques Kallis

    7. Adam Gilchrist (wk)

    8. Wasim Akram

    9. Shane Warne

    10. Muttiah Muralitharan

    11. Glenn McGrath

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/25/content/story/1145229.html
     
  2. mohsin88ali
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    mohsin88ali Talented

    Nov 8, 2017
    1,254
    Why are we playing two spinners? Unless we are playing in SC....
    I would have picked Waqar or Donald in place of Murali, or even Walsh.

    Sent from my QMobile i6i using Tapatalk
     
  3. Sultan Yusuf
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    Sultan Yusuf Talented

    Sep 1, 2010
    1,177
    I’d take out tendi and bring Dravid in - need a solid middle order batsman

    Also Sehwag replaced with Saeed Anwar
     
  4. Mohammed Bilal
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    Mohammed Bilal Tracer Bullet

    Jul 17, 2017
    7,256
  5. Sultan Yusuf
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    Sultan Yusuf Talented

    Sep 1, 2010
    1,177
    Very true. It’s just to please the fanboys. The Caucasians cannot leave out warne, but then murali has better stats on the face of it, so they feel they must pick both.

    One of Waqar, Donald or Curtly must make the cut
     
  6. mohsin88ali
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    mohsin88ali Talented

    Nov 8, 2017
    1,254
    Curtley took 224 wickets during the period. Here is the complete analysis.

    59 4412 224 6/24 20.70 13
    Mat runs wkts best ave 5

    Waqar took 291 wickets during the period.



    Sent from my QMobile i6i using Tapatalk
     
  7. abc_to_xyz
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    abc_to_xyz Youngsta Beauty

    Nov 20, 2016
    363
    Sehwag is over-rated, thanks to dead tracks and lack of line-length bowler during his time.

    Dravid or Sangakkara or Chanderpaul could have replaced him with ease.
     
  8. Bublu Bhuyan
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    Bublu Bhuyan Youngsta Beauty

    Feb 15, 2010
    268
    Waqar Younis not even good enough to make it to a World XI of the last 25 years, LMAO
     
  9. Mohammed Bilal
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    Mohammed Bilal Tracer Bullet

    Jul 17, 2017
    7,256
    Why are you speaking?

    First bloody produce a fast bowler than speak, stay within your aukat.
     
  10. Bublu Bhuyan
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    Bublu Bhuyan Youngsta Beauty

    Feb 15, 2010
    268
    That's like me asking a South African fan to first win a World Cup and then speak of comparing themselves with the Indian team. We know of about our history of fast bowlers, and we are the first ones to mock them.

    Regardless, Waqar couldn't even make it to a World XI of the last 25 years, LMAO.
     
  11. mohsin88ali
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    mohsin88ali Talented

    Nov 8, 2017
    1,254
    Neither could Kumble or Harbajan or Ashwin or Srinath.
    Remind me of Parsad's claim to fame?
    The sohail incident? Yes. What else?
    The Chennai test? We won that.

    Sent from my QMobile i6i using Tapatalk
     
  12. Bublu Bhuyan
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    Bublu Bhuyan Youngsta Beauty

    Feb 15, 2010
    268
    Here's what I said -

    Kumble, Harbhajan and Ashwin are spinners but none of them are better than Warne and Murali.
     
  13. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    The men's ODI XI of the last 25 years

    For a significant part of the last 25 years, Test and ODI teams did not differ radically from one another - cricket was cricket, after all, and class was class. ESPNcricinfo's mighty ODI XI of the last 25 years reflects this.

    Three are just three changes from the dream Test XI (Virat Kohli, AB De Villiers and MS Dhoni are the new entrants). The bowling line-up is identical.

    But the selectors' votes were more divided here than in the Test team. Only three of the players below got a perfect five; two received four votes each, and there were two ties. The first was between Ricky Ponting and Dhoni for a batting slot. Dhoni took that one (on batting merit). And immediately entered another tie, for the captaincy, with Shane Warne. He took that one too - a classic Dhoni come-from-behind finish. [see sidebar for selection method]

    The XI before you thus has two wicketkeepers (not counting de Villiers), so Dhoni could choose to assume his all-seeing position behind the stumps, get rid of the gloves and save himself 300-odd squats, or even choose to alternate: ask Adam Gilchrist to stand up to his compatriot Shane Warne, for example, while keeping himself to his former IPL team-mate Muttiah Muralitharan.

    Presumably that will be one of Dhoni's harder decisions, because this side comes with auto commands for every situation. Need to blast off the blocks? "Go for it, Gilly." Bat big? "Sachin, Brian, do your thing." Go berserk? "Let it rip, ABD." Middle-overs wickets? "Where are you, Warney?" Clean up the tail? "All yours, Waz." Tough chase? "Virat, you start, I'm coming."

    1. Adam Gilchrist

    For a decade the sight of Gilchrist lashing the new ball over the infield or the rope was the harbinger of another Australian triumph. In his first two World Cup finals he stonked fifties; in the third, he smashed 149, perhaps the most exhilarating innings ever played on the game's biggest stage. All that and the best wicketkeeping dismissals-per-innings going.

    Did you know? Each of Gilchrist's 16 hundreds were in wins, eight when batting first, and eight when chasing.

    STATS
    9619 runs at 35.89 from 287 ODIs (strike rate 96.94); Best 172; 16 hundreds, 55 fifties
    417 catches, 55 stumpings


    2. Sachin Tendulkar

    Tendulkar was the insatiable machine of one-day cricket. Nobody made as many runs, scored as many fifties, or hundreds - and in 2010, pushing 37, he became the first man to 200. He had more soul than a machine: few cricketers provided their countrymen memories as definitive, from Desert Storm in Sharjah to the Uppercut in Centurion.

    Did you know? Tendulkar won 62 Man-of-the-Match awards in ODIs - 29% more than the next best (Sanath Jayasuriya, 48).

    STATS
    16,980 runs at 46.14 from 413 ODIs (strike rate 87.29); Best 200*; 49 hundreds, 84 fifties
    142 wickets at 43.36 (econ rate 5.20); Best 5 for 32; 2 five-fors


    3. Brian Lara

    If Lara was born to bat in the longest form, he could also transfer that appetite to 50-over cricket. When he got to 10,000 ODI career runs, he was just one of a handful to have done so, and even fewer players had gone past 150 an innings as many times as him (three). All, of course, done in exquisite style.

    Did you know? Lara is one of only five batsmen to score over 5000 runs in wins at an average above 60; the others are Kohli, Dhoni, de Villiers and Hashim Amla.

    STATS
    8849 runs at 40.77 from 255 ODIs (strike rate 81.89); Best 169; 17 hundreds, 51 fifties


    4. Virat Kohli

    Not yet 30, Kohli already has claims to being the greatest to have ever batted in the one-day format. If his average, in the high-50s, is jaw-dropping, consider that he scores those runs at a strike rate well above 90, while rarely condescending to slog. No target is safe when Kohli is on the chase.

    Did you know? Kohli has 21 hundreds in chases - already four more than the next best (Tendulkar) - 19 of which have led to wins.

    STATS
    9030 runs at 55.74 from 202 ODIs (strike rate 91.73); Best 183; 32 hundreds, 45 fifties


    5. AB de Villiers

    The madman genius of limited-overs cricket. De Villiers sets himself up at the crease in ways bowlers cannot imagine, and makes shots that other batsmen cannot dream of. When in flow there is no batsman as destructive as him - and has possibly never been. Thirty-one-ball century anyone?

    Did you know? De Villiers is the only ODI batsman to score 1000-plus runs at an average of more than 50 and a strike rate of more than 100.

    STATS
    9515 runs at 54.06 from 225 ODIs (strike rate 101.07); Best 176; 25 hundreds, 53 fifties


    [​IMG]
    © ESPNcricinfo Ltd

    6. Jacques Kallis

    There may be bowlers, it is true, with more than 273 wickets, but have they scored over 11,000 colossal runs at 44 an innings? Kallis was the ultimate team balancer, equally capable of rescuing batting collapses and stepping up to bowl with the field still up.

    Did you know? Kallis is one of only two allrounders to get the double of 10,000 runs and 250 wickets; Jayasuriya is the other.

    STATS
    11,579 runs at 44.36 from 328 ODIs (strike rate 72.89); Best 139; 17 hundreds, 86 fifties
    273 wickets at 31.79 (econ rate 4.84); Best 5 for 30; 2 five-fors

    7. MS Dhoni

    Dhoni has the strength of an ox, the alacrity of a cat, and a technique all his own. He hits sixes as lustily as he steals singles nimbly, and has turned finishing-line manoeuvres into a party trick - none as famous as the straight six for the 2011 World Cup. Besides, no other keeper has 100 stumpings in one-day cricket.

    Did you know? Dhoni has remained unbeaten in 44 winning chases, the highest in ODI history. Jonty Rhodes is next with 33.

    STATS
    9898 runs at 51.55 from 312 ODIs (strike rate 88.46); Best 183*; 10 hundreds, 67 fifties
    293 catches, 105 stumpings


    8. Wasim Akram

    The two electrifying deliveries with which Akram bowled out Allan Lamb and Chris Lewis in the 1992 World Cup final are perhaps the greatest two deliveries ever bowled in one-day cricket. They also spell out in neon green why Akram could be perhaps the greatest one-day bowler there has ever been.

    Did you know? Akram has taken three or more wickets in an ODI innings more times than any other bowler - 76. Muralitharan is next with 68.

    STATS
    Bowling: 295 wickets at 23.83 from 208 ODIs (Econ rate 3.97); Best 5 for 15; 2 five-fors
    Batting: 2430 runs at 18.40 (strike rate 85.71); Best 79; 0 hundreds, 5 fifties

    Shane Warne

    If the Pakistanis showed that legspinners can be ODI match-winners, Warne left no doubt of it. With his prodigious breaks and phenomenal will to win, he could turn matches that were slipping away or ram home early advantages - and he demonstrated both, unforgettably, in the final two matches of the 1999 World Cup.

    Did you know? Warne is the only player to win three Man-of-the-Match awards in the semi-finals or finals of World Cups.

    STATS
    Bowling: 293 wickets at 25.73 from 194 ODIs (econ rate 4.25); Best 5 for 33; 1 five-for
    Batting: 1018 runs at 13.05 (strike rate 72.04); Best 55; 0 hundreds, 1 fifty

    10. Glenn McGrath

    He generated fewer column inches than the batsmen and the bad boys, but McGrath's line, length, cut and bounce were no less crucial to Australia's success. Particularly lethal in World Cups, he bowed out of international cricket in 2007, fittingly, not just as (three-time) World Cup winner, but also Player of the Tournament.

    Did you know? McGrath is the leading wicket-taker in World Cups with 71 wickets, at an average of 18.19 and economy rate of 3.96.

    STATS
    381 wickets at 22.02 from 250 ODIs (econ rate 3.88); Best 7 for 15; 7 five-fors
    11.
    Muttiah Muralitharan

    Murali claimed more wickets than anyone in ODI history, with more four-fours than anyone too, all at an economy rate straight out of the 1980s. He played five World Cups, won one, helped power Sri Lanka into the final of two and the semi-final of a third. Why wouldn't you have him in your side?

    Did you know? Took four or more wickets in an innings 25 times, second only to Waqar Younis, who did it 27 times.

    STATS
    534 wickets at 23.08 (econ rate 3.93); Best 7 for 39; 10 five-fors

    All statistics are for the period March 1, 1993 to December 31, 2017

    Readers' XI
    We polled ESPNcricinfo users in May, and their men's Test XI of the last 25 years is:

    1. Adam Gilchrist (wk)

    2. Sachin Tendulkar

    3. Ricky Ponting

    4. Virat Kohli

    5. AB de Villiers

    6. Jacques Kallis

    7. MS Dhoni

    8. Wasim Akram

    9. Shane Warne

    10. Muttiah Muralitharan

    11. Glenn McGrath

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/25/content/story/1146989.html
     
  14. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    The all-time men's T20I XI

    The men's T20I team of the last 25 years, as picked by our jury (see sidebar for details), isn't half-bad, even if we say so ourselves, given the volume of international action in the format is just a fraction of that in the club game.

    With all its members at their peak, this team can go toe to toe with the best XI assembled from T20 league cricket around the world today. (Then again, at least five from this line-up figure prominently in more than one of those leagues.)

    The muscle up top comes from two Indian batting powerhouses - and one West Indian giant of the format (no prizes for guessing who). An all-format superman is at No. 4, followed by the first man to make two centuries in T20I, and a wicketkeeper-captain who has mastered the art of digging sides out of holes at the crunch.

    The bowlers include a death-overs ace and master of the slower ball; the best current proponent of legspin in T20, one of few silver bullets of use against batsmen on the rampage; a wily old, much-retired master who can also slog sixes with the best of them; a purveyor of the screaming, toe-seeking yorker; and one of only two men to have taken two five-fors in international T20.

    Shane Watson, who might have slotted in as opener or lower, was unlucky to lose out, as was fellow Australian David Warner. And Saeed Ajmal narrowly missed out, depriving us of the prospect of a Pakistani-majority bowling attack.

    1. Chris Gayle

    The self-acclaimed Universe Boss has merited the tag in T20. He is the Bradman of the format, an unparalleled six-hitter and century-maker. And in T20 old age, he has even adapted his all-or-nothing approach and become a swifter starter.

    Did you know? Gayle is the first player to score a century in T20I international cricket - his 117 against South Africa in the inaugural World T20 game in 2007 - and the only man to score two centuries in the World T20.

    STATS
    1589 runs at 145.37 SR from 53 matches (Ave 34.54); Best: 117; 2 hundreds, 13 fifties


    2. Rohit Sharma

    An opener who makes his runs at high speed, yet often in a classical manner, Rohit has honed his six-hitting ability since he made his debut in the first World T20. His output has become more consistent, too: only Virat Kohli, among those who have played only the major T20I teams, has more runs in the format since the start of 2014.

    Did you know? No one has got to a T20I century in fewer than the 11.2 overs Rohit needed against Sri Lanka in 2017. That came up in only 35 balls - a joint record, with David Miller.

    STATS
    1647 runs at 135.11 SR from 71 matches (Ave 31.67); Best: 118; 2 hundreds, 12 fifties


    3. Virat Kohli

    The maestro of the chase, Kohli averages a stratospheric 84.84 when batting second. His 72 not out against South Africa in the 2014 World T20 semi-final contained only three dot balls; in the 2016 tournament, his epic 82 not out against Australia turned a fraught run chase into a waltz. No player in the world has been consistently able to score at comfortably over a run a ball while eschewing discernible risk - and that is a testament to Kohli's ability to finesse the ball through gaps and hare twos.

    Did you know? Kohli is the fastest man to 1000 runs in T20I cricket; it took him just 27 innings.

    STATS
    1956 runs at 137.84 SR (Ave 52.86) from 55 matches; Best 90*; 18 fifties


    4. AB de Villiers

    South Africa have often seemed unsure where best to use de Villiers - such is his prowess batting anywhere in the top six. There have been beguiling innings as an opener - a brutal 71 from 29 balls against England in 2016 ensured South Africa cruised to their target of 172 with over five overs to spare - and copious stunning innings batting lower. Also against England in the 2014 World T20, de Villiers smote 69 not out from 28 balls; against Afghanistan in the 2016 edition, he needed only 29 balls to hit 64, which included pummelling Rashid Khan for 29 in a single over.

    Did you know? Not just a magnificent batsman, de Villiers has also taken a record number of T20I catches; he is the joint holder of the record for most catches by a fielder.

    STATS
    Batting: 1672 runs at 135.16 SR (Ave 26.12) from 78 matches; Best 79*; 10 fifties
    Keeping: 21 catches, 7 stumpings


    5. Brendon McCullum

    His 158 not out on the first ever night of the IPL is among the most iconic innings in the format's history. He was as explosive in the international game - being the first to hit two centuries, including a brazen 116 not out against Australia in Christchurch, in which he repeatedly went down on one knee to scoop Shaun Tait.

    Did you know? McCullum was the first player to both 1000 and 2000 T20I runs. When he retired from T20I cricket, no one had a higher tally.

    STATS
    Batting: 2140 runs at 136.21 SR (Ave 35.66) from 71 matches; Best 123; 2 hundreds, 13 fifties
    br Keeping: 24 catches, 8 stumpings

    6. MS Dhoni (captain)

    The man who made India fall in love with T20 cricket when he brilliantly led the national team to victory in the inaugural World T20 in 2007. An expert finisher and a charismatic leader, who revelled in taking run chases to the wire - and then delivering just when needed.

    Did you know? He's the leading run-getter as captain, with 1112 runs in 72 games. And no one has captained in more games, or victories.

    STATS
    Batting: 1364 runs at 125.02 SR (Ave 36.86) from 86 matches; Best 56; 2 fifties

    Keeping: 47 catches, 29 stumpings

    [​IMG]
    © ESPNcricinfo Ltd
    7. Shahid Afridi

    When T20 was created, perhaps no cricketer already playing seemed so naturally suited to the format. Belligerent with the bat from his first ball, and a menace with his quick, accurate legspin - his stronger suit - Afridi combined the two to lead Pakistan to the 2009 World T20 title, when he was Man of the Match in both the semi-finals and final.

    Did you know? Afridi's haul of 11 Man-of-the-Match awards in T20Is are the most by any player.

    STATS
    Bowling: 97 wickets at 6.61 Econ from 98 matches; Best: 4 for 11; 3 four-fors
    Batting: 1405 runs at 150.75 SR (Ave 18.01); Best 54*; 4 fifties


    8. Dwayne Bravo

    An integral part of the only team to have won the World T20 crown twice, Bravo has an effervescence naturally suited to the format. His single, "Champion", had become a cult favourite; with his crafty death bowling, which combines slower balls with a surprise bounce, and versatile batting - able to either hit sixes with alacrity or rebuild - he has proved a champion on the pitch too.

    Did you know? No one is a better determinant of how well West Indies perform: Bravo has picked up 45 wickets in T20Is wins at 17.66 apiece - but in defeats he has just five wickets at an average of 130.20.

    STATS
    Bowling: 52 wickets at 8.46 Econ from 66 matches; Best 4 for 28; 2 four-fors
    Batting: 1142 runs at 116.41 SR (Ave 24.29); Best 66*; 4 fifties


    9. Rashid Khan

    The biggest beneficiary of the democratisation of cricket by T20. No type of bowling is more coveted in the format than legspin - and no one bowls it better than Rashid, who combines relentless accuracy with unusual pace for a legspinner (he is consistently over 60mph) and a brilliant, indecipherable googly.

    Did you know? The youngest and only teenager to reach the No. 1 ICC ranking in any format - which he has achieved in both T20Is and ODIs. No one has taken more T20I wickets since the start of 2016.

    STATS
    Bowling: 42 wickets at 5.91 Econ from 27 matches; Best 5 for 3; 1 five-for

    10.
    Umar Gul

    Able to spear yorkers in with rare precision, Gul was so supreme bowling at the death that he would often only be brought on around the 13th or 14th over, and entrusted to bowl his full allocation all the way through. A measure of how difficult it was for batsmen to attack him at the death is that he dismissed 19 batsmen in T20I cricket for ducks - a record.

    Did you know? Gul was the first bowler to take a five-wicket haul, when he took 5 for 6 against New Zealand in the World T20 in 2009. He recorded identical figures against South Africa in 2013.

    STATS
    Bowling: 85 wickets at 7.19 Econ from 60 matches; Best 5 for 6; 2 five-fors, 4 four-fors

    11.
    Lasith Malinga

    Combining a unique, slingy action with 90mph pace and a shrewd cricketing brain, Malinga was often unreadable at the death. While his yorker was his iconic delivery, he mixed it up with slower balls and bouncers, and his trajectory ensured that even his full tosses were less expensive than the average such delivery for many pace bowlers at the death.

    Did you know? Malinga is the leading wicket-taker in the final four overs of T20Is, with 53 of his 90 wickets coming at the death

    STATS
    Bowling: 90 wickets at 7.36 Econ from 68 matches; Best 5 for 31; 1 five-for, 1 four-for


    Readers' XI
    We polled ESPNcricinfo users in May, and their men's T20I XI of the last 25 years is:

    1. Chris Gayle

    2. Shane Watson

    3. Virat Kohli

    4. David Warner

    5. Brendon McCullum

    6. AB de Villiers

    7. MS Dhoni (wk)

    8. Dwayne Bravo

    9. Rashid Khan

    10. Sunil Narine

    11. Lasith Malinga

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/25/content/story/1147522.html
     
  15. mohsin88ali
    Offline

    mohsin88ali Talented

    Nov 8, 2017
    1,254
    A very good team but......
    It doesn't need TWO spinners, at least not for most of the pitches.
    Either pick Murli or Warne. I would personally go with Murli.
    Kallis was a world class batsman and an all-rounder but he batted at 3 and 4 for the most part of his career, NOT at 6.
    A position he is not suited to as you need someone who can "get a move on" from the start.
    An all-rounder is needed at 6, a more aggressive one with the bat.
    Klusner comes to mind, so does Pollock and Shane Watson but i would go with either Razzaq or Afridi (and not because i am a Pakistani but just look at their records)

    Sent from my QMobile i6i using Tapatalk
     

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