Fakhar Zaman - Pakistan's danger man (Changed my game because of the situation - Update #67)

Discussion in 'Cricket Talk' started by chandtara, Jan 8, 2018.

Users Who Have Read This Thread (Total: 0)

  1. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    The rain which struck Wellington during Pakistan's unsuccessful chase for 316 left a question mark over the second match in Nelson on Tuesday.

    Can New Zealand dismiss Fakhar Zaman?

    The hosts won by 61 runs via the Duckworth-Lewis method yesterday at the Basin Reserve, but the visitors never returned to the field to chase the revised target of 227.

    Fakhar looks a quality opener. Seeing him carving the ball around the ground in his 82 not out from 86 balls left a quiver of doubt New Zealand would have won if the match had gone the distance.

    The odds were in the Black Caps' favour. They had the advantage throughout, whether through the opening stand of 83 between Colin Munro and Martin Guptill, the acceleration from Kane Williamson and Henry Nicholls at the death, or the new ball partnership between Tim Southee and Trent Boult which left the tourists 37 for four in the ninth over.

    With four wickets in hand, Pakistan required 150 runs to win at a required rate of 7.56 per over. Any chance of victory was minimal, but Fakhar looked comfortable against the cunning of Boult and Southee, the pace of Lockie Ferguson, and the flight of Mitchell Santner and Todd Astle.

    He played the first of his 10 ODIs against South Africa at the Champions Trophy in June.
    By tournament's end Fakhar was man-of-the-match in the final, making 114 off 106 balls as Pakistan trounced India by 180 runs.

    The left-hander averages 53.55 and makes his ODI runs at almost a run a ball. He had not been in a losing ODI team until yesterday.

    Another variable can be added to Tuesday's equation. Pakistan return to Saxton Oval, the venue they started their tour on Wednesday against a New Zealand XI.

    They were sent in and made 341 for nine. Fakhar top scored, retiring on 106 off 84 balls after spending more than two hours familiarising himself with the conditions.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/news/article.cfm?c_id=4&objectid=11970740
     
  2. s_h_a_f
    Online

    s_h_a_f Whispering Death

    Dec 26, 2011
    8,241
    It seems he is our only hope in these conditions. Love his array of shots & attacking mindset.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. Del
    Offline

    Del Cornered Tiger

    Dec 21, 2016
    12,554
    Dont have high hopes, but only following this series to see how Fakhar and Faheem perform.
     
  4. Mohammed Bilal
    Offline

    Mohammed Bilal Tracer Bullet

    Jul 17, 2017
    7,256
    He is a player on true wickets,I've seen him play and he is not a T20 or Test player but he is a proper One Day specialist.

    Isn't that good,These stupid journalists/Pundits don't know nothing they were calling for him to leave even after Hafeez didn't do nothing vs the lankans,Hafeez couldn't even make a 40 in that series whilst zaman made 2 40s and did well in the 3rd game.

    Hafeez is the worst player however if you are clever you should drop Malik as he ain't buying no runs as he is a big FTB.
     
    • Useful / Interesting Useful / Interesting x 1
    • List
  5. godzilla
    Offline

    godzilla Smooth Operator

    May 12, 2016
    3,147
    whether he fails or not this series, its a disgrace that not only is he the only batter with a backbone in the side, has been singularly responsible for the batting resurgence in the side and the champions trophy, and yet he is singled out by pundits like amir sohail as being found out.

    even if he fails, its difficult to see how his head ends up on the chopping block ahead of Azhar, or hafiz or malik.

    I think its beyond any doubt that fakhar is our premier bat in terms of impact, babar is the most promising if he can continue his career trajectory, and the others at best are reasonably good, mediocre or past it at worst.

    if sarfraz is going in with five specialist bats, then he has to play as a specialist bat and not the pinch/frenetic/half-bat/doesnt-really-matter that he is currently playing like.
     
  6. s_h_a_f
    Online

    s_h_a_f Whispering Death

    Dec 26, 2011
    8,241
    And injury has ruled him out of the 2nd ODI. Great.
     
  7. Don Quixote
    Offline

    Don Quixote Whispering Death

    Nov 13, 2015
    8,641
    Spot on here!
     
  8. godzilla
    Offline

    godzilla Smooth Operator

    May 12, 2016
    3,147
    /;
    the one day game is clearly his strongest suit, but if hes not a test player how do you explain his 42 FC average?

    In T20s he is a 130sr slogger - they come off or they dont, its just a lottery but thats what the format is. I can see the argument either way for a 26 average 130+sr batter there.

    bottom line is he is a permanent fixture in odis because he has shown results, and more importantly the backbone to have earned his place there, and has bought far more leeway than potherb in the batting line up that neither perform nor are criticised by self appointed pundits, but he could easily play tests given our opening choices, and hes not a bad call for t20s.
     
  9. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Fakhar Zaman turning into a big-match player for Pakistan

    Some players thrive on the biggest stage. The greater the challenge, they better they perform. And since you don’t find those characteristics in your average cricketers, big-match performers remain etched in memory for a long time.

    Australia’s wicketkeeper batsman Adam Gilchrist is one of the biggest ‘big-match’ players in history. The Aussies won the 1999, 2003 and the 2007 World Cups. Gilchrist’s contribution in those three wins was 54 from 36 balls, 57 from 48 balls and 149 from 104 balls, respectively. Basically, a champion of finals.

    Doing it once is good. Doing it consistently takes a lot of effort and also shows the mentality of the player. And it’s safe to say Pakistan opener Fakhar Zaman is made of the same material that made Gilchirst what he was.

    The left-handed batsman burst onto the scene during the Champions Trophy in England last year and smashed two fifties to help his team qualify for the final where he cracked a century against India in the final to end the contest within the first 35 overs itself.

    And just to prove that glorious Champions Trophy was not a fluke – if anyone still had a doubt – Zaman came up with an equally fine innings under pressure as he made 91 from 46 balls to help chase down 184 in the T20 tri-series final against Australia.

    Pakistan had lost two wickets in the first over of the chase but Zaman hit back with even more power, smashing 12 fours and three sixes.

    The left-handed batsman doesn’t have a conventional stance and predominantly plays on the leg side. But what he has in abundance is a strong mind and ability to soak in the pressure.

    Pakistan have a brilliant bowling attack, are led by a good captain in Sarfraz Ahmed and have some very promising batsmen. Zaman adds an altogether different dimension to the team. Something that no system in the world can inculcate – big-match mentality.

    http://sport360.com/article/cricket...-turning-into-a-big-match-player-for-pakistan
     
  10. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    ‘Big-match player’ Zaman has excelled where others have failed: Yasir Hameed

    KARACHI : Fakhar Zaman — the man of the final and the man of the series — produced yet another master class to help Pakistan defeat Australia by six wickets in the final of the T20I Tri-Series and former Pakistan opener Yasir Hameed has thoroughly enjoyed what he has seen from the Mardan-born.

    Fakhar made 91 runs off 46 balls to not only break the record for the most runs by a Pakistani in a T20I series (278); he also has the most T20I runs in the world for the current year.

    Pakistan, who were 2-2 in the very first over, were saved by Zaman’s resilience and Hameed, who himself was an impressive opener for Pakistan, has praised the mentality with which Zaman bats, especially in big matches.

    “He has not failed in any match and has carried the expectations, the pressure and the temperament very well throughout the series,” said Hameed. “He has always performed in pressure matches where most batsmen have failed. He played well in the Champions Trophy final match against India and now in this final against Australia; both are the top teams of T20 cricket.”

    He further added: “The batsman who handles the pressure and doesn’t panic in pressure matches like these always succeeds and Fakhar’s genius is that he takes out the pressure from the game and helps the team reach their target.”

    https://tribune.com.pk/story/1752825/7-big-match-player-zaman-excelled-others-failed-yasir-hameed/
     
  11. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    'Big match' Fakhar the hero as Pakistan veer from dire to delightful

    "Muscled" is a term that might be applied quite liberally to Australia's approach to T20 batting. They huff and puff and heave and swing at the ball as if they mean to rip the leather clean off it. Slightly built and a shade under six feet tall, Fakhar Zaman doesn't have the hardware to follow the same method. Pakistan's free-wheeling opener's game instead marries hand and eye and has made him the leading run-scorer in T20I cricket this year, with 516 runs in 13 innings capped by a career-best 91 when it really mattered against Australia in the tri-series final.

    "I think nowadays he's in the best form of his life," reckoned Pakistan captain Sarfraz Ahmed. "The way he's batted throughout the series has been good for us and good for his career. If he keeps playing like this, he's only going up and up."

    It's not just how Fakhar's been scoring his runs, but also when. His century in the Champions Trophy final last year is an obvious case in point for big match temperament, and his innings in the tri-series final will only enhance that reputation.

    "Yes, he's definitely [a big-match player]," said Sarfraz. "He performs in big games, consistently. Like the Champions Trophy, in the final, he got that hundred. In New Zealand, he scored a fifty and then a 40-odd (in successive T20Is, to help Pakistan come from 1-0 down to win the three-match series). He's a big-game player and he's getting better day by day."

    His innings against Australia was all the more remarkable considering the early strife Pakistan were in. Flummoxed by Glenn Maxwell in the first over, they were 2 for 2 needing almost 10 an over pretty much as soon as their innings began. That's a position most other teams would be unable to rise from, but an hour later Pakistan's fans at the ground (and a few hundred turned up to support them) were singing "Jeetega bhai jeetega, Pakistan jeetega" and "Pakistan Zindabad" as their team improbably, inexplicably romped home. Pakistan can drop Aaron Finch first ball, concede 10 an over for the first 10 overs and then surge back into the game with eight wickets in the next 10. They can be 2 for 2, and then complete a record run chase with five balls to spare. It's become an obvious cliche, but Pakistan remain an absorbingly mercurial team.

    "We know they're an emotional team, and they're a highly skilled team," Australia captain Finch said. "When they're on, they're incredibly good. We let them back into the game with bat and ball today. We had a chance to get up around that 200 mark and almost put the game to bed after that start with the ball. To chase 10 or 11 an over for 18 or 19 overs is incredibly hard. So if we'd had a few more runs, if we'd squeezed a little more with the ball early on and made them take risks. They didn't have to take too many risks to get boundaries early on."

    Fakhar's batting wasn't entirely risk free, but his aggressive strokes came in a calculated manner. In that regard, he's not entirely dissimilar to his current batting coach Grant Flower, who came close to mastering the delicate risk/reward balance with his own batting, particularly towards the end of his career. Flower and Fakhar have certainly spent enough time together in the nets. Flower has been Pakistan's batting coach for four years now, which is enough time for the famously committed former Zimbabwe batsman to have sent down tens of thousands of throwdowns.

    "He works really hard with the boys," Sarfraz said of Flower. "He's worked very hard for the last four years. He's always in the nets." Whatever he's doing, it's working for Fakhar, who has also looked to learn from the old heads around him in the playing XI.

    "In the start in T20 cricket I was hitting every ball in my striking zone, and after playing eight to 10 games I sat with some senior players like Shoaib Malik and Sarfraz Ahmed, and spoke about my gameplans with them," Fakhar had said after Pakistan's previous match. "I realised that I could play proper cricket shots and be successful, and that's what I've been doing recently."

    Fakhar has certainly made an impression on the Australians. Finch called him "a thorn in our side" earlier this week, today adding: "We've all seen the form that Fakhar has been in. We saw with Shoaib Malik there, towards the end, if you have a batter who's in, they can control the game, they control the strike."

    Capped by Fakhar's career-best 91 and Malik's masterclass, Pakistan had veered between ordinary to extraordinary all morning. Shadab Khan dropped a sitter at point and then pulled off a one-handed blinder at mid-off. Hasan Ali's massive, ballooning no-ball didn't even bounce before it landed in Sarfraz' gloves, leaving Pakistan's captain - finally - lost for words. Two balls later, Hasan shattered Ashton Agar's stumps, brilliance and farce bookending the over.

    Whether it's letting the opposition sprint to 95 for 0, or slipping to 2 for 2 at the start of a record chase, Pakistan are the sort of team who get themselves into these situations. But they're also the sort of team that can get themselves out of them. "You can't take anything for granted against the number one team in the world," said Finch. "Or any international team." But especially if that team is Pakistan.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/24039444/big-match-fakhar-hero-pakistan-veer-dire-delightful
     
  12. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Zaman reveals reason behind success in big matches

    KARACHI : Left-handed opening batsman Fakhar Zaman, who scored a match-winning 91 in the T20I Tri-Series final against Australia on Sunday, has revealed the reason behind his success in big matches.

    This was not the first time that Zaman has contributed significantly in a final, having scored a breathtaking century against arch-rivals India in their famous title clash at the International Cricket Council (ICC) Champions Trophy last year.

    The 28-year-old, while talking to Cricbuzz, explained why he is successful in big matches. “Honestly speaking, I don’t think about finals as a different game and I have scored a lot of runs in domestic competition finals as well,” said Zaman. “In big matches, I just try to take a little more time and maybe that is the reason behind my success.”

    He added: “Since we lost two wickets today, I had no other option other than to take my time and try to consolidate as we could not afford to lose any more wickets.”

    Talking about the importance of the victory for the Men in Green in the competition, Zaman believes the win will play a major role in further boosting the confidence of a team that has been blowing away all comers in recent series.

    “The victory is really important as we came in the tournament as the number one team in T20Is,” he said. “We did not perform to our full capacity in the first match, but then we got together, trained hard with the coaching staff and the results are there for everyone to see. We were looking for the win and the guys were working really hard in the nets and thanks to God, we achieved this victory. Credit to Australia as well since they played really good cricket; but today was just our day.”

    https://tribune.com.pk/story/1753407/7-zaman-reveals-reason-behind-success-big-matches/
     
  13. s_h_a_f
    Online

    s_h_a_f Whispering Death

    Dec 26, 2011
    8,241
    He has the quality that the team has been missing for a very long time. Love it.
     
  14. Shahzad.Firdous
    Offline

    Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

    May 29, 2010
    12,526
    He is the team's best batsman in limited overs cricket. He is very much like Saeed Anwar. The only other opener after Saeed Anwar and Aamir Sohail was Salman Butt, who possessed some style and now Fakhar Zaman is the next big thing!!
     
  15. Dare2Dream
    Offline

    Dare2Dream Talented

    May 4, 2010
    2,147
    Quality player, it was absurd not to play him in Tests this summer
     
  16. Ahson8
    Offline

    Ahson8 Sultan of Swing

    Jun 9, 2012
    18,595
    Lol Sharjeel was way more talented than Butt
     
  17. Shahzad.Firdous
    Offline

    Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

    May 29, 2010
    12,526
    Butt had some class in his cover drives and flicks!
     
  18. Patriot
    Offline

    Patriot Kaptaan

    Oct 8, 2014
    25,556
    he got caught for leaving 2 balls
     
  19. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Fakhar Zaman terms PSL a 'game changer'

    KARACHI: Last year he was no way near Pakistan cricket, now Fakhar Zaman has become an integral part of the team, single-handedly winning games for the green shirts.

    The 28-year-old batsman who came into the limelight during the second edition of the Pakistan Super League (PSL), termed the tournament as a "game changer" for him.

    Speaking exclusively to Geo.tv, Fakhar said PSL played an important part in growing him as a player.

    “Before playing for Pakistan, PSL is a great platform for youngsters to come and enhance their skills. They share the dressing room with top players and play against them as well," the batsman said.

    "The coaching and competition standard in PSL is very high and it changes your game rapidly,” the flamboyant batsman added.

    However, PSL cannot be credited as the sole reason in making Fakhar into a match-winning player.

    “Learning from failure and working hard are important factors for me,” he said, adding that he received help and guidance from senior player Shoaib Malik.

    “Every time I made a mistake, Shoaib bhai and other senior players helped me to improve and overcome it," the batsman said.

    "The key is hard work and practice," he added.

    The batsman who scored a match-winning 91 to help Pakistan complete a record chase win against Australia in the final of tri-series T20I in Zimbabwe, added that he did not regret missing out on the century in the final as he was looking to finish the match early.

    “Cricket is a game in which one becomes thankless. If you score 200, you will feel, you should have scored 250 but I don’t have such regrets,” he said.

    “I wanted to finish the game in 18 overs and I know I could have scored the century but I wanted to finish the game early. I am happy that we won the final of the tournament,” he added.

    The batsman also revealed that his approach in big matches such as tournament finals are a bit different than regular games.

    “I usually play aggressively from the beginning in regular matches, but in games like tournament final, I try to spend time on the wicket and get settled down before showing my natural game,” he said.

    Fakhar who achieved the feat of completing 500 runs in the calendar year during his innings of 91 in the final said he isn't eying to break any records and is instead focused on scoring more runs for the team.

    “T20 is such a difficult format that you can’t make big claims of doing this or doing that,” Fakhar said.

    “I just want to score in every game I play and help the team to win matches. If I keep on doing this, then all records will be made automatically,” he added.

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/202561-fakhar-zaman-terms-psl-as-game-changer
     
  20. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Fakhar Zaman needs just 273 runs in next 5 innings to become the fastest batsman to score 1000 ODI runs
     
  21. mohsin88ali
    Offline

    mohsin88ali Talented

    Nov 8, 2017
    1,254
    I made a thread on this subject...

    Sent from knowhere
     
  22. Del
    Offline

    Del Cornered Tiger

    Dec 21, 2016
    12,554
    The best thing happened to Pakistan cricket along with Hassan and Shaddy.

    Apparently it seems that he trying to play deep in the innings and try to stay on pitch as long as he can, which is a refreshing change.
     
  23. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Fakhar Zaman: “I am working hard on my technique and hope I will debut soon in Tests”

    Pakistan opener Fakhar Zaman has been in red-hot form as of late and has been one of the top performers for the national team in limited overs cricket over the last 12 months.

    On Monday, Zaman struck a career-best 117 not out, which was his second ODI century, to lead his side to a comprehensive nine-wicket win over Zimbabwe in the second ODI in Bulawayo.

    Having made his presence felt once again, Zaman is now eager to do the same in Test cricket.

    Zaman has yet to make his Test debut, but he hopes that will change in the near future.

    “My playing Test cricket depends on the management, I was a part of the Test team during the UK tour but didn’t play,” he was quoted as saying. “But they are working with me in the nets. Even when we’re playing ODIs/T20Is, [head coach] Mickey [Arthur] still tells me special things about Test cricket.

    “I am working hard on my technique and hope I will debut soon in Tests.

    “Before international cricket and Pakistan A, I was doing really well in FC cricket. I have an average of 43 (actually 41.91) in first-class cricket so I think it won’t be something very new to me, I am used to it.”

    https://battingwithbimal.com/2018/07/17/fakhar-zaman-determined-achieve-future/
     
  24. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Aakash Chopra overawed by Zaman’s progress in international cricket

    Pakistani opener Fakhar Zaman has taken giant strides in the world of cricket. A couple of seasons ago, not many knew about this talented southpaw. Now, he has joined the elite list of players who have achieved the unique distinction of scoring an ODI double century. The cricket world has taken a note of this emerging star and one among the many fans he has made is Aakash Chopra.

    The former Indian cricketer recently took to micro blogging site Twitter to praise the steady progress that Fakhar Zaman has made in the world cricket. He remarked that it is indeed a very big achievement to score in excess of 1000 ODI runs in just 18 innings. Aakash Chopra also cited the two big knocks of Zaman’s career thus far.


    Fakhar Zaman had shot to fame after he scored a century against team India in the finals of the ICC Champions Trophy 2017. It was a defining knock that made him a star in his country. He continued his good run of form for the national side after that game.

    And recently, in the fourth ODI against Zimbabwe, he entered the record books as the first Pakistani batsman to score a double century in ODI cricket. He smashed an unbeaten 210 in the game as Pakistan registered their best ever total in the fifty-over format of the game. The way he is playing at the moment, team Pakistan would be having high hopes from him for the upcoming edition of the ICC World Cup.

    Several former cricketers have already showered praises on him and Aakash Chopra is not the first one to be overawed by his progress. Recently, Shahid Afridi had heaped praises on Zaman as well.

    Here is what Aakash Chopra posted:
    “1000 runs in just 18 innings. A ton in a CT Final. Already an ODI double century to his name. Fakhar Zaman making a swift move early on…,” Aakash Chopra wrote in his tweet.

    https://www.crictracker.com/aakash-chopra-overawed-zamans-progress-international-cricket/
     
  25. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Zaman has the traits to scale greater heights

    Fakhar Zaman has stamped his class as one of the world’s best players in the shorter formats of the game in just over a year since his international debut. His consistency and wide range of strokes makes him the best player that Pakistan has produced in recent years.

    Every time I’ve watched Zaman in action, I am reminded of Pakistan’s former great left hander Saeed Anwar’s hunger for runs. It could be because I’ve reported almost all of Anwar’s great innings, especially the seven One Day International (ODI) centuries at the Sharjah Cricket Stadium during the nineties. This included his three consecutive centuries in 1993 in the Pepsi Champions Trophy and two consecutive tons in the Singer Champions Trophy in 1996.

    [​IMG]
    Since Anwar retired in 2003, with every passing year, one always wondered whether Pakistan would ever get another opener who would be as hungry for runs like him. So it was a delight that, after a wait of nearly 14 years, while reporting the Champions Trophy in England in 2017 when Zaman proved his class with knocks of 31, 50 and 57 followed by his championship-winning stunning knock of 114 against India at the Oval in his debut series.

    The world then hailed him as a champion in the making. Little wonder that, last Friday in Bulawayo, he broke Anwar’s highest score of 194 to become the first Pakistan batsman to score an ODI double hundred.

    Zaman’s greatest quality is his refusal to give away his wicket. His average of 75.38 from his 17 ODI matches is a testimony to that. Usually youngsters imbibe traits like discipline and hard work from former cricketers, but Zaman picked it up while serving in the navy as a sailor before becoming a cricketer. His colleague now call him ‘fauji’, which means soldier, and he has proved that he has all the qualities of a brave soldier when facing the toughest of bowlers. As a sailor who has learnt to survive the rough seas, it wasn’t hard for him to steer Pakistan through tough phases of some innings.

    Consistency is another characteristic of Zaman, something he has cultivated through discipline. As a sailor he is used to waking up before dawn and going on a jog for miles, and that is now a habit with him. So it is no surprise that he now has the stamina to bat with ease even when making a double hundred.

    Zaman created history for Pakistan and joins an elite group of ODI double-centurions like Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, Rohit Sharma, Chris Gayle and Martin Guptill, thereby declaring that he is ready to carry his nation to greater heights in the game. His feat also proves that, despite the lack of international cricket in their country, Pakistan can produce record breakers.

    https://gulfnews.com/sport/cricket/zaman-has-the-traits-to-scale-greater-heights-1.2255215
     
  26. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    ‘Zaman broke the bowling machine for more practice, that’s how passionate he is’

    KARACHI : Pakistan opener Fakhar Zaman has been making headlines for all the right reasons. From being the first double-centurion in Pakistan’s history to breaking the record for the fastest cricketer to get to 1,000 runs in ODIs, Zaman is just having the time of his life.

    Since lighting up the second edition of the Pakistan Super League (PSL) back in 2017, the Mardan-born has not looked back and has taken huge strides forwards.

    And while the 28-year-old has announced himself to the world in style, a lot happened in his early years as a cricketer which shaped him into a world beater today.

    Navy coach Nizam Khan and Pakistan Cricket Club’s — Zaman’s first club — coach Azam Khan played an pivotal part in grooming and developing his talent and it was under their guidance and mentorship that Zaman learnt to perfect his batting.

    “He [Zaman] was eager to learn from a very young age and while training with the Navy, his passion for cricket increased drastically,” recalled Nizam while talking about how Zaman’s passion for the game started.

    “Zaman joined the Navy in 2007-08 and was in PNS Bahadur’s operational branch,” he added. “Since the very first day he was extremely fond of cricket and one day, when he and his batch mates came for swimming, I was told that there was someone who wants to meet me. It was Zaman, who had come to tell me that he loved cricket and wanted to pursue it. My question was: How are you in love with cricket when there is no cricket in Mardan? He replied: It’s my passion.”

    Seeing Zaman’s love for cricket, Nizam called him for training and after being impressed with his raw talent in the nets, he requested Azam to give him an opportunity to play inter-district matches.

    It was there that Zaman was selected by selector Zafar Ahmed and started impressing everyone around him. He made 55 in his first U19 district match and followed that up with an impressive 90 in the second.

    He then joined Karachi Region’s team and started playing first-class matches and that was when Nizam realised that Zaman was pursuing a wrong career.

    “After seeing his talent, I knew that that Navy was not for him. He was already finding it difficult to juggle cricket and the Navy academy’s commitments so I told [then] Director Sports Captain Mehtab Ahmed to get him transferred from academy training to the field of sports. After that, the rest is right in front of everyone as Zaman is not only an international cricketer, but one who can make the nation proud,” said Nizam.

    While talking about Zaman’s love for the sport, Nizam narrated an incident where Zaman broke the bowling machine because he was just so eager to practice.

    “While in the Navy, Zaman started practicing in the nets with some friends at 6am in the morning. And because of the dew and the wet ball, he damaged the bowling machine. I was extremely angry and asked him as to why did he have to practice so early, but he just said that I will buy you a new one when I play for the national side one day,” said Nizam.

    Azam, meanwhile, highlighted how Nizam had played a pivotal role in Zaman’s development.

    “Nizam brought Zaman to club practice and then the youngster started coming to me for training three days a week. Nizam also worked on his batting and constantly advised him to work on staying on the crease for a long time,” he said.

    ‘Just scoring a single 50 or a 100 is not what you should aim for. Even having scores of 35-40 in a lot of matches won’t benefit you. Stay long on the crease and play as much as you can.’

    These were the words Nizam had said to Zaman and his batting style lays testament to the fact that Zaman has not forgotten his coaches’ words.

    Azam further said that apart from Zaman’s batting prowess, it was his character and his humble personality which has made him a success.

    “He always respects his seniors, prays five times a day, lives a modest life and works extremely hard to achieve his targets and that is what has made him who he is today,” said Azam.

    https://tribune.com.pk/story/1764639/7-zaman-broke-bowling-machine-practice-thats-passionate/
     
  27. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Fakhar Zaman - from king of Katlang to pride of Pakistan

    Were it not for one or two twists of fate, Fakhar Zaman might have been watching Pakistan's tour of Zimbabwe on television, from the mess deck of one of the nine or so frigates that patrol Pakistan's 650 mile coastline along the Arabian Sea.

    But in an enjoyable narrative twist instead, the man who found cricket while serving in the navy has travelled thousands of miles to a tiny landlocked Southern African country - and become the first Pakistani batsman to score a double-hundred in a one-day international. "Today was my day," Fakhar said after his historic innings.

    This innings did indeed seem fated, and Fakhar also explained that - ever the navy man - he was only acting under orders from his coach Mickey Arthur. "Mickey told me before the toss that if we win the toss we will bat first and 'I want you to score a double-hundred'", Fakhar explained. "So I applied myself today and scored one."

    "Some coaches like giving their players totals to go for and targets, some people play better under those pressures and some people feel the pressure more than others," said Pakistan batting coach Grant Flower. "It just depends on your players." Clearly, Fakhar is comfortable under pressure.

    Since he got to Zimbabwe three weeks ago, he has scored 708 runs in just nine innings, averaging over 55 in the T20 tri-series and a whopping 430 across the four ODIs played so far, being dismissed just once.

    His 210 not out on Friday included 29 boundaries - the most in an ODI innings by a Pakistan batsman - and is all the more remarkable considering he hadn't even faced a ball until the fourth over of the innings. With his 24th and final four, belted to the cover boundary, he reached a summit 200 runs high, writing himself indelibly into the record books and Pakistani cricketing lore.

    "It's a great achievement," said Flower, who is in his fifth year as Pakistan's batting coach and has overseen Fakhar's rise from rookie to record breaker. "I've done a lot of work with him in the nets, but he's got a lot of natural talent and he's worked really hard. Coming from his background, being in the navy and being very raw when he first came into the set-up, his technique has come a long way. But he's still got a lot of his naturalness, and I think that's his biggest asset."

    Fakhar's double hundred is, of course, only part of the story, one well worth telling. As a teenager, he moved from his home in Katlang, just north of Mardan, to Karachi and joined the navy at his father's behest. Young Fakhar wasn't too taken with the idea, but the move ended up changing his life. When he was sent to PNS Karsaz in Karachi for further training, he met Nazim Khan, coach of the Pakistan Naval Cricket Academy.

    Welcomed into the side, he cracked a hundred in his first game and was also introduced to Azam Khan, a noted Karachi cricket fan. From that came a place in inter-district Under-19 cricket, where his talents continued to bloom. He was allowed to leave his position as a sailor in the navy, and re-join as a professional sportsman, ten years ago.

    He eventually forced his way into first-class cricket, but it wasn't until the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy in 2016-17 that his form began to be noticed. His performances in the Pakistan Super League led to a call-up to Pakistan's T20I side, and then on into the one-day side. All along the way, he was aided by a work ethic gained from his navy background, and Flower believes the effects of that background can still be seen today. As a 17-year-old sailor, he'd regularly wake before dawn to go for runs that spanned many miles, before performing his duties in the daytime and playing sport in the evenings.

    "It definitely comes from the navy," Flower said. "He is fit, and that definitely helps getting a double-hundred. Even though it's not that hot right now, you're doing a lot of shuttles out there and your concentration span has to be at its best.

    "He showed a lot of mental strength today. He had a couple of shots where he might have given it away, but he had a bit of luck. But a lot of times when you play with confidence and bravery, the luck goes your way."

    After motoring past 150, the next milestone for Fakhar was Saeed Anwar's 194. With a pick-up over the leg side off Donald Tiripano, he moved past the record held by Anwar for 21 years. Comparisons between the two are perhaps inevitable, as both are free-flowing left-handed openers, but their batting is built around vastly different methodologies. Where Anwar was a study of graceful strokeplay through the off side - and often behind point - Fakhar's bat is more shovel than rapier and he's more likely to bludgeon his boundaries through wide mid-on.

    And yet, there is more to his singularly unorthodox, homespun batting technique than that, as he showed on Friday morning. The fourth ODI was played on the pitch dead centre in the Queens Sports Club oval, with boundaries equidistant on all sides, and Fakhar pinged all of them. The heave to midwicket was certainly on show, and that's where he scored the bulk of his runs, but so were swats through cover, wallops through point, sweeps reversed, slogged and lapped off the spinners, and even a sublime glide through the gully off Blessing Muzarabani, which suggested finesse rather than brutality.

    It's the sort of technique that relies on close coordination of hand and eye, and one which probably wouldn't take well to too much tinkering. As such, Flower has sought to enhance Fakhar's natural talents, rather than change them.

    "I've just done some basic stuff, getting his head to the ball and not playing too much away from his body," Flower explained. "But at the same time, that's one of his strengths. So it's a bit of give and take, you just try and find a balance. He's coming on in leaps and bounds, as everyone can see. Hopefully he'll keep his head to the ground and keep training hard. He's a very good person, so I'm sure that will happen."


    Perhaps the only regret from Friday would be that there weren't more people to see the record-breaking innings. The sun came out and temperatures rose for the first time in the series, but there were less than a thousand people at the ground to watch the game.

    Not that that will bother Fakhar. Beyond his self-assuredness at the crease, his unorthodoxy, and his uncanny ability to find the boundary, there seems to be a grounded human being equipped with that rare feature in the modern professional cricketer: a sense of humour.

    When asked whether his stellar batting might be depriving the middle order of time in the middle, he joked: "Well I'll keep trying to not give them the chance!"

    His historic double-hundred has gained him entry into an elite club alongside the likes of Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, Rohit Sharma, Chris Gayle and Martin Guptill. 'Fakhar' means pride in Urdu, and the pride of Katlang became the pride of Pakistan today.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/24151042/fakhar-zaman-king-katlang-pride-pakistan
     
  28. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    The Pakistan cricket team’s opening slots have been one of the sport’s all-time great puzzles. Following Saeed Anwar and Aamer Sohail’s now much celebrated, even if not quite as prolific, opening partnership, Pakistan spent a good two decades to find an opening pair consistent enough to string two series together. Most of these two decades have actually been jarred by not even a single reliable enough opener, who one could really say will go the distance.

    After a tragic ODI continuum that featured the likes of Shahid Afridi, Imran Nazir, Imran Farhat, Yasir Hameed, Taufiq Umar, Salman Butt, Kamran Akmal, Mohammed Hafeez, Ahmed Shehzad and Azhar Ali, Pakistan seemed to have finally found the man who could carry the burden that came with the position, while fulfilling the needs of the modern game.

    He was left-handed, a find of the Pakistan Super League, and had an explosive style of play. His name was Sharjeel Khan.

    After setting the inaugural edition of the PSL afire with the champions Islamabad United in 2016, Sharjeel went on to impress at the international levels in places as tricky as England and Australia. But the same platform that gave him the springboard to reach new heights saw his downfall as the spot-fixing saga in PSL 2 saw him banned by the PCB.

    A bright young Pakistani talent halted by involvement in spot-fixing – where have we seen this before? But after Sharjeel, Pakistan cricket almost immediately found a replacement.

    He is left-handed, a find of the Pakistan Super League, and has an explosive style of play. His name is Fakhar Zaman.

    While Sharjeel came up with the inaugural champions of the PSL, Fakhar has done so with a side that has finished bottom in all three editions: Lahore Qalandars.

    But while he hasn’t quite seen success at the domestic franchise T20 league, where Fakhar has benefitted from is working directly with former New Zealand skipper Brendon McCullum.

    While McCullum has failed to turn around the Qalandars’ fortunes, his unearthing of Fakhar Zaman alone might make his stint with the PSL worth it. Fakhar’s fearless brand of batting is a leaf out of the successful career of the New Zealand veteran, who has ruled the roost around the world especially in the shorter formats of the game.

    On Friday, Fakhar broke the 21-year-old record held by Saeed Anwar’s 194 in Chennai, as he became the highest scorer in a single innings for Pakistan with 210* in the fourth ODI against Zimbabwe. As Pakistan posted their highest ever ODI total 399/1, Fakhar along with Imam-ul-Haq posted the highest ever opening partnership in a 50 over contest with 304, which is the fourth highest partnership of all time for any wicket.

    Fakhar is only the sixth double centurion in ODI history, the first for Pakistan, and the one who took the least number of matches to notch the first double hundred. On Sunday, he also became the quickest to 1,000 ODI runs taking only 18 matches.

    And yet his exploits in Zimbabwe – given the opposition – are hardly the greatest achievements of his young and prolific career so far.

    His performances in the ICC Champions Trophy final last year, and the T20I tri-series final against Australia this month showcased that he is a big match player who thrives under pressure. That the latter came in a chase means that Fakhar looks like singlehandedly addressing two of Pakistan’s age-old problems: opening batsmen and struggles in run chases.

    While it is Babar Azam who has been getting the plaudits for his run-scoring over the past couple of years, it is Fakhar Zaman who is the archetypal modern day batsman. Contrast Fakhar’s approach to when he was on the brink of 200 – a milestone in Pakistan cricket history – to when Babar Azam usually bats when he’s approaching a fifty, regardless of the match situation.

    Of course, both Fakhar and Babar are indubitable future stars for Pakistan cricket. But it’s the former that is righting the wrongs for Pakistan in limited-overs cricket.

    And with the Asia Cup and bilateral series against the likes of Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and England preceding next year’s ODI World Cup, the coming 12 months would provide countless opportunities to further substantiate that claim.



    The writer is a Lahore-based journalist.

    https://nation.com.pk/24-Jul-2018/future-is-fakhar
     
  29. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Zoom zoom Zaman

    If Shahid Afridi became endearingly known as Boom Boom due to his aggression and Misbah Ul-Haq became infamously associated with Tuk Tuk in India, Fakhar Zaman can potentially be labelled as Zoom Zoom in the aftermath of his performance in Zimbabwe. To the observer’s eye, Fakhar Zaman’s batting seems unorthodox and full of shots that are composed of swatting and/or thwacking the ball across the boundary. Over the years the Pakistani fan has become used to seeing a semi-regular batting collapse and then an anchor role being initiated that would lead to a defensive approach to the game. With Zaman’s style of play, the Pakistani side has finally seen the establishment of a base and foundation that promotes the fostering of aggressive tactics.

    Fakhar Zaman’s prolific performance on African soil has demonstrated that the left-handed batsman has the potential to solve Pakistan’s opening woes since the cricketing days of Saeed Anwar, at least from one end. Since post-2000, Pakistan has continuously been experimenting with its openers to establish consistency at the top of the batting order. The days of Pakistan opening consisting of Salman Butt, Mohammad Hafeez, Taufeeq Umar, Imran Farhat, Kamran Akmal, Ahmed Shehzad, and Sharjeel Khan is now nothing but a part of the past. Some of these individuals should have never donned the Pakistan emblem as a select few became notoriously known for spot-fixing, bowling improperly, dropping catches, and being involved in taking substances to enhance performance. Fakhar Zaman, a navy man, brings a fresh face to Pakistan’s opening department. Perhaps the next item on Mickey Arthur’s agenda is to tweak and refine Pakistan’s opening through finding a sound and dependable partner who compliments Fakhar Zaman’s dynamic batting. Although Imam Ul Haq seems like a good option, one mustn’t overlook the experience of Azhar Ali and/or be promoting Babar Azam at the top of the order.

    Zaman smashing 210* against Zimbabwe has launched the Pakistani opener into joining an elite 200-club alongside the likes of Martin Guptill of New Zealand, Chris Gayle of the West Indies, and India’s trio of Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, and Rohit Sharma. He became the least capped player to produce a 200+ score, only taking 17 innings. The 210* knock contributed to Pakistan securing the world record for the highest opening partnership, a 304 run stand, in ODI history. Zaman surpassed Saeed Anwar’s famous knock of 194, which was hit against India in India (Chennai) during the Independence Cup in 1997. At the time, Anwar’s innings broke the world record for the highest-ever-individual score in ODI cricket. Although Anwar’s 194 cemented his legacy, only time will tell if Zaman utilises his double hundred as a platform to set himself up to become amongst Pakistan’s greatest openers. In 2010, ESPN Cricinfo declared that an all-time Pakistan XI would have an opening pair of both Saeed Anwar and Hanif Mohammad. The latter became famed for the longest ever-batting stint in Test Cricket. Although Fakhar Zaman is yet to be capped as a Test player, he has been a tremendous find for Pakistan Cricket. Perhaps the PCB should look to cultivate him as a Test Cricketer so that he can represent Pakistan across all formats.

    Nevertheless, Fakhar Zaman has catalysed newfound energy in the post Misbah-Younis period of Pakistan Cricket. Since his international debut in early 2017, he single-handedly established the foundation for Pakistan winning their first ever Champions Trophy through his man of the match performance. The double hundred that he has hit against Zimbabwe has only pushed his case further for being a tremendous force to be reckoned with as the 2019 World Cup is right around the corner. His style of batting is quite ruthless to the eye, and it almost seems as though his line of attack stems from an inspiration that is derived from the Kamikaze style of Afridi’s batting meshed with Razzaq’s resolute stance. Zaman is currently ranked second on the ICC T20I Batting Rankings. Zaman is listed at the twenty-fourth position on the ICC ODI Batting Rankings. However, his form against Zimbabwe should catapult him in the latter classification. Zaman just became the fastest to 1000 runs (18 innings) in ODI cricket and surpassed Sir Vivan Richards (21 innings). No player in the history of ODI cricket has scored more in a five-match series. It is just a matter of time before the Champions Trophy Final’s Man of the Match, Fakhar Zaman, achieves the #1 rank by the ICC in both of the limited formats of the game.

    The author is a postgrad at Oxford University where he studies Modern South Asia with an emphasis on politics and international relations.

    https://nation.com.pk/26-Jul-2018/zoom-zoom-zaman
     
  30. Shahzad.Firdous
    Offline

    Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

    May 29, 2010
    12,526
    Best possible Pakistan ODI lineup Post 2010 era (mostly Misbah Afridi Sarfraz era):

    1. Hafeez
    2. Sharjeel Khan
    3. Fakhar Zaman
    4. Younus Khan
    5. Misbah (VC)
    6. Shahid Afridi (C)
    7. Kamran Akmal / Sarfraz
    8. Amir
    9. Saeed Ajmal
    10. Umar Gul
    11. Mohd Irfan
    Reserves: Shoaib Malik, Fawad Alam, Wahab Riaz, Azhar Ali, Hassan Ali, Sarfraz, Shadab Khan, Yasir Shah.
     
  31. baqir
    Offline

    baqir Cornered Tiger

    Sep 17, 2012
    10,250
    Fakhar Zaman has been a great asset, team leader & a phenomenal open for the men in green! Fakhar has talent & potential to lead Pakistan into the WC 19’ Finals!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  32. Mohammed Bilal
    Offline

    Mohammed Bilal Tracer Bullet

    Jul 17, 2017
    7,256
    He immediately started his career with a bang striking a few boundaries of Rabada, people say good bowlers will figure him out however with the exception of probably Morne Morkel who is now retired Fakhar has dominated all the good bowlers which is rather strange.
     
  33. ElRaja
    Offline

    ElRaja Talented

    Jan 12, 2013
    2,778
    fakhar is mentally strong, he gives chances early but unlike other pak batsmen capitalises on those chances more often than not. hes pretty similar to sehwag in his approach. but im pretty sure he'll eventually hit a rough patch and the usual crowd of pak fans will turn on him and be like we always knew he was a hack, etc.

    the first thing i said about him, and what is still true today is that he plays selflessly, and that is worth its weight in gold cos it sets the tempo as an opener. he will fail, but when he comes good he is more likely to win u the game than any other batsmen.
     
  34. abc_to_xyz
    Offline

    abc_to_xyz Youngsta Beauty

    Nov 20, 2016
    363
    I will still look for Sharjeel to partner him asap. Its not that easy to hit quality fast bowlers for him while Sharjeel was natural.
     
  35. Shahzad.Firdous
    Offline

    Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

    May 29, 2010
    12,526
    I would play Fakhar at 3 and have Azhar and Sharjeel open!
     
  36. mohsin88ali
    Offline

    mohsin88ali Talented

    Nov 8, 2017
    1,254
    FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, DROP AZHER, HE IS NOT SUITED TO ODI'S.


    Why the hell would you open with HACKFEEZ when you have Fakher?
    Also, no Younus (as much as i love the guy, both as a cricketer and a human)
    Replace him with Malik or Fawad.

    Also, Irfan could hardly bowl his full quota every time. Wahab or Hassan would be much better choices.

    Sent from knowhere
     
  37. Shahzad.Firdous
    Offline

    Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

    May 29, 2010
    12,526
    I dont like two left handers at the top (unless they are Saeed Anwar Aamir Sohail). I want to see a right hand left combination at the top.
     
  38. Shahzad.Firdous
    Offline

    Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

    May 29, 2010
    12,526
    Irfan was a better bowler than both Wahab and Hassan! He was the most dangerous one csu of his height and his height does make a difference!! I rate him as the 2nd best pacer in this era for Pakistan after Mohd Amir!! Gul comes 3rd Wahab comes 4th Junaid 5th Hassan 6th
     
  39. Mohammed Bilal
    Offline

    Mohammed Bilal Tracer Bullet

    Jul 17, 2017
    7,256
    Babar Azam apka kya gamaya hai?

    Don’t give me the excuse that he doesn’t do well against good teams, averages 38 including that poor NZ series against Aus, Eng, NZ and SA, also in the PSL where all our batsman forgot how to pick up a bat Babar made 6 fifties.
     
  40. Shahzad.Firdous
    Offline

    Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

    May 29, 2010
    12,526
    this is the best possible odi 11 of last 8 years. Babar Azam is a very good player but he will need time to be the best!! Azhar despite his ineffeciency has been a run getter and consistently played as an opener for a time! Sharjeel Khan has been dynamic in odi format, Fakhar Zaman can bat long at No. 3 plus he can charge against the spinners so No. 3 is suitable for him. Younus and Misbah the two senior pros. Hafeez plays cus he is an allrounder utility cricketer./ He is our 6th bowler so there is no slot available for Babar right now. In next 5 years, he will definitely be a huge player including Fakhar Zaman as well. Fakhar and Babar will serve Pakistan batting for a long time to come!!
     

Share This Page