Muhammad Ali: Boxing legend dies at age of 74

Discussion in 'Sportistan' started by chandtara, Jun 3, 2016.

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  1. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
  2. SwingNSeam
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    SwingNSeam Boom Boom

    Sep 12, 2010
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  3. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Mohammed Ali has passed away

    Innah Lillahi Wainnah Ilahi Rajioun :(
     
  4. Fawad
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    Fawad Sultan of Swing

    Sep 1, 2010
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    Rest in peace, champ.
     
  5. SwingNSeam
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    SwingNSeam Boom Boom

    Sep 12, 2010
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    Inna lillahe wa Inna ilahe rajeon. Rip legend
     
  6. Fireworks11
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    Fireworks11 Kaptaan

    Sep 22, 2012
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    Inna lillahe wa Inna ilahe rajeon.

    One of sports greatest if not the greatest. What a guy he was. His quotes were legendary
     
  7. Passionate Pakistani
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    Passionate Pakistani The Don

    Jun 10, 2011
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    Inna lilahi wa inna ilahi rajioon.
     
  8. Fireworks11
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    Fireworks11 Kaptaan

    Sep 22, 2012
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  9. PakistanZindabad!
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    PakistanZindabad! Cornered Tiger

    Sep 29, 2012
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    Inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi rajioon
     
  10. Mohsin
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    Mohsin Sultan of Swing

    Feb 21, 2010
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    Inalillahi wainailairajioun
     
  11. CricketFan96
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    CricketFan96 Smooth Operator

    Aug 4, 2012
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    Inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi rajioon.

    One of the greatest figures in sporting history #legend!
     
  12. Bella
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    Bella Youngsta Beauty

    Jan 24, 2010
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    R.I.P. to a great man. What he wrote in his memoir.



    CkFWooSWYAApjda.jpg
     
  13. Markhor
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    Markhor Talented

    May 9, 2010
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    An icon who transcended the world of sport. Unmatched charisma and personality. A legendary trash talker and a huge figure in the civil rights era.
     
  14. Markhor
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    Markhor Talented

    May 9, 2010
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    I love coming back to the Arsenio Hall show with Muhammad Ali, Sugar Ray Leonard and Mike Tyson.

    Just look at the hushed reverence everyone there has for Ali.

     
  15. ASLI-PATHAN
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    ASLI-PATHAN Cricistan Khan

    Apr 26, 2011
    64,646
    Inna Lillahi wa inna ilaihi raji'un

    Greatest sports personality. May Allah grant him a place in Jannah.
     
  16. Ahson8
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    Ahson8 Sultan of Swing

    Jun 9, 2012
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    Inna lilahi wa inna ilaihi rajioon.
     
  17. ElRaja
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    ElRaja Talented

    Jan 12, 2013
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    RIP legend, a champion through and through.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Shahzebayub
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    Shahzebayub Smooth Operator

    Feb 3, 2012
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  19. Patriot
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    Patriot Kaptaan

    Oct 8, 2014
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    RIP

    Legend, GOAT, Role model, Inspiration, Example. These are the five words that comes to my mind every time someone mentions his name. There won't be anyone like him. Once every century. Guy who went to prison for refusing to go to war and kill people, The Man who helped WWE with Wrestlemania and putting over talent like Gorilla Monsoon. That's how humble this man was, he didn't have any ego. He always helped those around him, motivated those who needed and inspired us. How many MMA, Wrestlers, Body Builders, Boxers, athletes found success because of Ali being their inspiration. I will lose count. You will be missed dearly
     
  20. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    ‘Our’ Muhammad Ali — Why Pakistanis saw him as one of their own

    Muhammad Ali. —AFP



    Anyone who lived through the 1970s could not have remained immune to the phenomenon that was Muhammad Ali, even if — like me — they had missed him at the peak of his athletic powers.

    Coming back to boxing after being stripped of his world heavyweight title and having his boxing license revoked in 1967 by US boxing authorities for three and a half years — because of his refusal to participate in America’s war in Vietnam — he was a larger than life figure.

    Not only was he a spectacular athlete rising from the ashes of forced exile, he was a moral giant, unafraid to put his principles before fame and money. But as a kid, I didn’t know all this.

    Early mornings with Ali
    For me, it was the pure excitement he inspired in everyone around me, particularly my father.

    I still vividly recall being woken up by him early in the morning so my brother and I could watch PTV’s live transmission with him of Ali’s famous ‘Rumble in the Jungle’ fight against George Foreman in Kinshasa, Zaire. Ali would win that hugely hyped fight to regain his heavyweight crown.



    We would repeat that early morning ritual many times later, whenever Ali’s fights were shown in Pakistan, which — if I am not mistaken — was always.

    Live transmissions of sporting events were rare events then and being allowed, nay encouraged, to wake up in the middle of the night to view them, were the pinnacle of excitement as a kid.

    Explore: Dawn archives — 'Muhammad Ali comes to Pakistan' and more

    At some point, I was presented with a 45rpm record of Ali’s iconic pep song ‘Float Like A Butterfly, Sting Like A Bee’ and it became one of my most prized possessions. I used to listen to it over and over:

    ‘Sing Muhammad / Muhammad Ali / He floats like a butterfly and stings like a bee / Muhammad / The black Superman / Who calls to the other guy ‘I’m Ali… / ‘Catch me if you can’.’


    Later on, as I grew older, I came to despise the very spectacle of boxing, which more and more reminded me of Roman gladiatorial contests, poor people damaging and sometimes, killing each other for the sport of others and the monetary benefit of rich promoters.

    The long-term medical consequences of concussive blows to the head that boxing perhaps causes were only tragically manifest in Ali’s own later development of Parkinson’s disease.

    Perhaps this growing up coincided with Ali’s decline as well, perhaps it was independent of it.

    But I more or less lost interest in watching boxing after Ali was beaten by a young and unlikeable Leon Spinks. Ali would go on and win his title back one more time from Spinks but he was already not the same athlete any more.

    When he lost his last title fight with Larry Holmes in 1980, it was too painful to watch.

    But I never stopped loving Ali.

    [​IMG]
    In this Sept. 10, 1973, file photo, Muhammad Ali, right, winces as Ken Norton hits him with a left to the head during their re-match at the Forum in Inglewood, California. Photo: —AP


    As I learned more about the struggles of his early years (my father bought me a biography) and his conscientious objection to America’s murderous war in Vietnam and his activism against racism at home, my respect only deepened.

    As many people have pointed out, he was a poor black kid from Kentucky who bootstrapped himself up to the heights of fame and money and then gave it all up for his principles.

    In pictures: Muhammad Ali: 'The Greatest' boxer, showman, ambassador

    Not only this, he was willing to accept the derision of his hyper-patriotic countryfolk and undergo a jail sentence for his values.

    One would be hard-pressed to find any other such example of moral fearlessness in the sporting or entertainment world, where athletes and entertainers cave under far softer pressures, usually just the threat of withdrawal of sponsorship dollars.

    Pakistan's Champ
    I have often pondered over what it was that inspired such a following of an American boxer so far away in a country like Pakistan — certainly no other pugilist before or since Ali has inspired the same sort of adulation.

    Muhammad Ali. —AFP


    Anyone who lived through the 1970s could not have remained immune to the phenomenon that was Muhammad Ali, even if — like me — they had missed him at the peak of his athletic powers.

    Coming back to boxing after being stripped of his world heavyweight title and having his boxing license revoked in 1967 by US boxing authorities for three and a half years — because of his refusal to participate in America’s war in Vietnam — he was a larger than life figure.

    Not only was he a spectacular athlete rising from the ashes of forced exile, he was a moral giant, unafraid to put his principles before fame and money. But as a kid, I didn’t know all this.

    Early mornings with Ali
    For me, it was the pure excitement he inspired in everyone around me, particularly my father.

    I still vividly recall being woken up by him early in the morning so my brother and I could watch PTV’s live transmission with him of Ali’s famous ‘Rumble in the Jungle’ fight against George Foreman in Kinshasa, Zaire. Ali would win that hugely hyped fight to regain his heavyweight crown.



    We would repeat that early morning ritual many times later, whenever Ali’s fights were shown in Pakistan, which — if I am not mistaken — was always.

    Live transmissions of sporting events were rare events then and being allowed, nay encouraged, to wake up in the middle of the night to view them, were the pinnacle of excitement as a kid.

    Explore: Dawn archives — 'Muhammad Ali comes to Pakistan' and more

    At some point, I was presented with a 45rpm record of Ali’s iconic pep song ‘Float Like A Butterfly, Sting Like A Bee’ and it became one of my most prized possessions. I used to listen to it over and over:

    ‘Sing Muhammad / Muhammad Ali / He floats like a butterfly and stings like a bee / Muhammad / The black Superman / Who calls to the other guy ‘I’m Ali… / ‘Catch me if you can’.’


    Later on, as I grew older, I came to despise the very spectacle of boxing, which more and more reminded me of Roman gladiatorial contests, poor people damaging and sometimes, killing each other for the sport of others and the monetary benefit of rich promoters.

    The long-term medical consequences of concussive blows to the head that boxing perhaps causes were only tragically manifest in Ali’s own later development of Parkinson’s disease.

    Perhaps this growing up coincided with Ali’s decline as well, perhaps it was independent of it.

    But I more or less lost interest in watching boxing after Ali was beaten by a young and unlikeable Leon Spinks. Ali would go on and win his title back one more time from Spinks but he was already not the same athlete any more.

    When he lost his last title fight with Larry Holmes in 1980, it was too painful to watch.

    But I never stopped loving Ali.

    [​IMG]
    In this Sept. 10, 1973, file photo, Muhammad Ali, right, winces as Ken Norton hits him with a left to the head during their re-match at the Forum in Inglewood, California. Photo: —AP


    As I learned more about the struggles of his early years (my father bought me a biography) and his conscientious objection to America’s murderous war in Vietnam and his activism against racism at home, my respect only deepened.

    As many people have pointed out, he was a poor black kid from Kentucky who bootstrapped himself up to the heights of fame and money and then gave it all up for his principles.

    In pictures: Muhammad Ali: 'The Greatest' boxer, showman, ambassador

    Not only this, he was willing to accept the derision of his hyper-patriotic countryfolk and undergo a jail sentence for his values.

    One would be hard-pressed to find any other such example of moral fearlessness in the sporting or entertainment world, where athletes and entertainers cave under far softer pressures, usually just the threat of withdrawal of sponsorship dollars.

    Pakistan's Champ
    I have often pondered over what it was that inspired such a following of an American boxer so far away in a country like Pakistan — certainly no other pugilist before or since Ali has inspired the same sort of adulation.

    Pakistanis often still do not know the names of most American athletes and boxing is still a fringe sport in this country. Was it the fact that he had converted to Islam and Pakistanis came to see him as one of their own?

    [​IMG]
    The American Maula Jutt — Muhammad Ali with Pakistani actor Sultan Rahi on Ali's visit to Pakistan. —Photo courtesy of Twitter


    It’s probably true that Ali being a Muslim played a big part in why Pakistanis embraced him as ‘ours.’

    Recall that these were also heady days of the 1st Islamic Summit Conference, which had taken place in Lahore in early 1974, with grand calls for Muslim unity.

    But to reduce the phenomenon of Ali to his religious conversion would be simplistic.

    It doesn’t explain, for example, his massive adoration around the world, even among non-Muslims. Mike Tyson, another world-renowned boxer, would also convert to Islam many years later but he never commanded the love of ordinary Pakistanis the way Ali did.

    No, Ali was much more than just a convert.

    In his persona Ali projected a complicated mix of emotions for his fans around the world — underdog fighting against the odds, moral strength, grace under pressure, likeable wit, anti-colonialism, anti-imperialism, sacrificing for what one believes in and, yes, the beauty of pure athleticism.

    [​IMG]


    Some of these qualities were even inferred from his sportsmanship. I recall discussing as a young boy how Ali never went for body-blows, unlike his rivals, his only jabs were to the head.

    This was taken, in our naïve hero-worship, as another sign of how Ali played ‘clean’, never sullying himself with ‘low’ things like punches to the gut or the abdomen.

    But boxing was never the real reason for Ali’s greatness. The fact of the matter is Ali transcended sport and spectacle.

    This is why even 30-odd years after his retirement he remained an icon, even to those (in the majority, it should be pointed out) who never lived through the 1970s and were born long after he entered the ring for the last time. He was what we all aspire to be as human beings.

    Rest in peace, Champ. You truly were the greatest.


    [​IMG]

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1262898/our-muhammad-ali-why-pakistanis-saw-him-as-one-of-their-own
     
  21. Markhor
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    Markhor Talented

    May 9, 2010
    2,701
    Going to take the time to watch the Michael Parkinson specials with Mohammad Ali this evening. They're all gems and well worth viewing.

    Great insight of society and the state of race relations in that era.
     
  22. SOPL
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    SOPL Talented

    Jun 4, 2013
    2,706
    I was very sad to hear the news upon waking up yesterday. An absolute legend of a man, he was not just a boxer, his persona and achievements transcend whatever accomplishments he had in the ring. There are very few sportsmen who became worldwide, household names - in fact, I can't think of any other than Ali - even my dadi knows who Ali was!

    Inna lillahi wa inna illayhi rajioon, I hope he and his family are granted sabr. Ultimately I think they'll be happy to see him go after suffering from Parkinson's Disease for ~ 30 years, an obvious consequence of staying on for 7 years too many after the 1976 fight against Smokin' Joe. His contributions to the civil rights movement, reimmersion of pride and dignity into having African heritage, his stand against oppression and unjust war and his infectious charisma will not be forgotten.

    I remember a few years ago (maybe when I was 14/15?) getting about 1/3 of the way through a very detailed book talking about his 2 fights with Sonny Liston in '64 and '65 but from what I can remember, I stopped reading. I'm not sure exactly why though, I'll hopefully try to find that book again in the summer.

    Anyway, I don't think any words will do justice to how legendary a figure Muhammad Ali was. It's best just to watch his poetic semantics:



    ^ I don't necessarily wan't to 'religionise' any issue though.

    Really, man? His contribution to fake wrestling is on the bottom of his pile of achievements to the world. He did much better things.
     
  23. SOPL
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    SOPL Talented

    Jun 4, 2013
    2,706
    Remember that quote, "You either die as a hero or live long enough to become the villain"? Ali totally flipped the script on that one. Though he committed his fair share of sins too (gorilla comments regarding Joe Frazier etc).

    Considered a cocky black negro at the time (sic, not intended to be racist, a prevailing attitude of the time) and now he is deemed to be a universal figure, able to be celebrated by everyone, regardless of race or colour.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2016
  24. Patriot
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    Patriot Kaptaan

    Oct 8, 2014
    26,200
    I'm stating he didn't care about his stature in the real world and took bump to promote a business, he did get paid for it but Stars like him get paid and keep their stature. He was put over in comics against Superman fyi
     
  25. Fireworks11
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    Fireworks11 Kaptaan

    Sep 22, 2012
    31,530
    Mad respect for not putting the star on the walk of fame. Guy was a legend.

    From the cocky youth days to the wise old days.
     
  26. SwingNSeam
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    SwingNSeam Boom Boom

    Sep 12, 2010
    24,759
    He beat the crap out of supes lol
     

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