On This Day - Classic Pakistani Matches, Blast From The Past

Discussion in 'Cricket Talk' started by chandtara, Apr 17, 2016.

  1. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Prudential World Cup, 2nd Match: Pakistan v Sri Lanka at Swansea, Jun 9, 1983

    Match scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65065.html

    Pakistan posted 338/5 off their 60 overs. Mohsin Khan and Zaheer Abbas top scored with 82, Miandad smashed 72 from 52 and Imran Khan 56 off 33.

    Sri Lanka fell 50 short of the target as Sarfraz Nawaz took 3/40

    At Swansea, June 9. Pakistan won by 50 runs. Though put in on a damp pitch, Pakistan had no difficulty in making a score which always looked certain to be out of Sri Lanka's reach. At opening stand of 88 between Mudassar and Mohsin was followed by a fine innings of 82 by Zaheer and a violent assault on the medium-paced bowling by Miandad and Imran. Sri Lanka were always behind the required scoring-rate and Pakistan did not miss Imran's bowling.

    Man of the Match: Mohsin Khan.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/150409.html
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
  2. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    ICC World Twenty20, 9th Match, Group B: Netherlands v Pakistan at Lord's, Jun 9, 2009

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/wt202009/engine/current/match/355999.html

    Afridi seals Pakistan's progression

    Shahid Afridi carried Pakistan into the Super Eights at the expense of a spirited but outclassed Dutch side at Lord's, as he ripped his top-spinning legbreaks through a succession of bamboozled defences to deliver his team a thumping 82-run victory with the superb figures of 4 for 11 from four overs. For the Netherlands, the end came with unseemly haste as they lost their last nine wickets for 52 in 10.2 overs, but they still left the tournament with their heads held high after last week's unforgettable floodlit triumph over England.





    Today, however, the greater class and knowhow of the Pakistanis came to the fore. They produced a chastened display after their error-strewn effort against England at The Oval on Sunday, and though their batting was kept on a tight leash by some determined Dutch bowling, the prospect of defeat was never seriously entertained. Netherlands were set 176 for victory, but thanks to their superior net run-rate going into this game, they could still have gone through with a score of 151 or more. In the end, the calculations were academic.



    Netherlands were given a typically brief but belligerent start from their pinch-hitter, Darron Reekers, who smashed three fours from his first five balls including two stand-and-deliver slaps over long-on from Mohammad Aamer, but that, realistically, was as good as their run-chase got. From his very next delivery, Reekers miscued another wild wallop, and Sohail Tanvir claimed a well-judged catch at deep midwicket.

    It wasn't a faultless display by any stretch of the imagination, and Pakistan's fallible catching again resurfaced when Alexei Kervezee was gifted two lives in consecutive overs. But Afridi struck with his first delivery of the match when he slid a topspinner through Bas Zuiderent's defences, and Peter Borren followed one over later when he top-edged a sweep off Saeed Ajmal. Kervezee's chancy innings came to an end in the same over as he galloped down the wicket to slap what would have been their first boundary in front of square for seven overs, but was defeated by the doosra and stumped by a mile.

    At 49 for 4 in the ninth over, the Dutch resistance had been all but crushed, and Afridi stepped forward to grind them down even further. Though he fumbled a run-out opportunity to let Tom de Grooth get off the mark first-ball, Afridi struck with the first ball of his third over, a full flat topspinner that flattened the leg stump. Two balls later, Daan van Bunge yorked himself as he charged down the track and was easily stumped for a duck, and though Ryan ten Doeschate stemmed the procession with a six over midwicket off Shoaib Malik, his same-over dismissal - again to a yorker-length stumping - reduced the score to a sorry 71 for 7.

    Afridi had time to claim one more wicket in his superlative four-over spell, as Edgar Schiferli flogged a lofted drive to deep mid-off, before Kamran Akmal completed his fourth stumping of the match - again off Ajmal - as Dirk Nannes was dragged out of his ground. It was left to Umar Gul to seal the contest with 14 balls to spare, when he splattered Pieter Seelaar's stumps with another full-length delivery. Pakistan's captain, Younis Khan, may have derided Twenty20 matches as "fun" after their defeat against England, but this was a very serious performance indeed.

    The tone of the Pakistan performance was set during their six Powerplay overs, in which they raced to 50 for 1. Salman Butt, singled out by his captain after the England match for the woeful state of his fielding, responded with the aggression of a man whose job was on the line as he whipped his first ball, from Nannes, through midwicket for four, before launching Schiferli over the covers and into the Mound Stand for six.

    Just as Butt was beginning to cut loose, however, he drilled ten Doeschate to Borren at mid-off for 18. Malik launched his innings with two fours in three balls before being badly dropped by Zuiderent at backward point on 14, and when Akmal found his range with a brace of sixes in consecutive overs, Pakistan had reached 77 for 1 with 11 overs remaining, and looked as though they were pulling clear.

    But Netherlands showed from a similar position against England that they are a side who will not give up, and Borren combined with the 21-year-old offspinner, Seelaar, to put the brakes back on the innings. Having reached 41 from 29 balls, Akmal found himself frustrated in a beautifully slow and teasing second over from Seelaar, which ended with an ambitious drill over midwicket, and a heart-in-the-mouth juggling catch from Schiferli in front of the Tavern Stand.

    The Dutch bowlers maintained their discipline admirably as the overs ticked away. If in doubt they went full, sometimes offering full-tosses, but there was scarcely a long-hop in evidence. Younis dented ten Doeschate's figures by clearing his front foot to swipe Pakistan's fourth six of the innings, then belted Seelaar for two more in two balls to hoist his team past 150 with 15 balls remaining. But Seelaar kept his cool, and his line and length, and before the over was out, de Grooth at long-on had intercepted Younis's next shot in anger.

    Schiferli maintained the full-and-straight approach to deny Afridi the room to swing his arms, although he did finally connect with one to drill Nannes out of the ground with four balls remaining. The bowler responded by uprooting his leg stump with the very next delivery, but as Afridi would later go on to show with the ball, sometimes there is simply no stopping him. When the mood takes them, there is sometimes no stopping Pakistan either.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wt202009/content/story/408141.html?object=355999

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  3. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    ICC World Cup, 7th Super: Pakistan v Zimbabwe at The Oval, Jun 11, 1999

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65229.html

    Saeed Anwar century
    Saqlain Mushtaq hat trick

    At The Oval, June 11. Pakistan won by 148 runs. Toss: Pakistan.

    Pakistan eased into the semi-finals with an emphatic victory. Playing their third match in six days, Zimbabwe had mustered only four fit men for rest-day practice - and Johnson, their key all-rounder, was unable to bowl. Saeed Anwar, who hit 11 fours, returned to his best form with a typically wristy century, and put on 95 with the solid Wajahatullah Wasti. Whittall and Huckle applied the brakes, and Streak returned to become the first Zimbabwean to take 100 one-day wickets, but an ebullient knock from Shahid Afridi - whose two sixes included one towering spiral over cover - lifted the total to 271.

    The Shoaib Akhtar express soon demolished Grant Flower's stumps, and three wickets from the busy Abdur Razzaq left Zimbabwe struggling to avoid fatal damage in the run-rate column. Johnson again battled well for 54, and Streak and Olonga each lasted 31 balls. Then Saqlain Mushtaq, on his adopted home ground, ended things with a hat-trick - his second in one-day internationals, both against Zimbabwe, and the second in the World Cup, after Chetan Sharma bowled three New Zealanders at Nagpur in 1987-88.

    Man of the Match: Saeed Anwar. Attendance: 18,298.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/151521.html

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    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
  4. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    June 11: When Saqlain bagged his second three-in-three

    Pakistan has always been known for its firepower in the bowling department. In 1999 World Cup, when Pakistan entered the Super Sixes stage, it had already beaten West Indies, Scotland, Australia and New Zealand in the group stages. The consecutive victories were followed by defeats against Bangladesh and South Africa.

    However, when the time came to complete the job in Super Sixes and qualify for the semi-finals, off-spinner Saqlain Mushtaq stepped up as the perfect finisher against Zimbabwe.

    Pakistan riding on the back of Saeed Anwar’s 103 off 144 balls set a 272-run target for Alistair Campbell-led side. Heath streak and Henry Olonga had bagged two wickets apiece for Zimbabwe.

    Zimbabwe, in their chase, lost their first six wickets under the century mark. Paul Strang was the seventh batsmen to be dismissed as Zimbabwe were restricted to 110-7 after Azhar took an astounding one-handed catch in slips off Shoaib Akhtar.

    Zimbabwe could only add 13 more runs to their total when Saqlain came to bowl the 41st over of the match. And then the rest is history.

    Henry Olonga charged forward for a slog over midwicket and missed the first ball of the over. Moin Khan, behind the stumps, was quick to take off the bails. Third umpire was only referred to as a precaution.

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    Adam Huckle walked in and went for a big swing as well; he was perfectly squared by Saqlain’s off-spinner on that occasion. Moin felt practising collect-and-stump during the two dismissals.

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    With the crowd ecstatic and expecting a hat-trick from their favourite off-spinner, Pakistani fielders were brought in for a nick or edge. Pommie Mbangwa, with five fielders surrounding him, decided to go for a Test-like block but was struck in front of the wickets on his pads. Umpire raised his finger and the match was well over.

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    Jubilations were obvious as the teammates, followed by the crowd, hugged and cheered Saqlain who became the then second only person in the world of 50-over cricket to bag two hat-tricks. The first one, without any doubt, was a Pakistani too — the great Wasim Akram.

    Later, Sri Lankan pacer Lasith Malinga bettered this record by taking three hat-tricks in ODIs. One of them was actually a four-on-four against South Africa at Guyana in 2007.

    However, in ODIs, Pakistan has fared better than all the cricketing nations when it comes to hat-tricks. In the stated history of ODI cricket, a total of 39 hat-tricks have been taken and Pakistani bowlers have grabbed eight out of them — the most by any nation.


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    CREATIVE: NABEEL AHMED

    Even the first stated ODI hat-trick was taken by a Pakistan medium-pacer Jalalud Din in 1982 against Australia. Wasim followed with two in 1989 and 1990 against West Indies and Australia respectively. Aaqib Javed then struck thrice against India in 1991 at Sharjah. Waqar Younis trembled the Kiwis in 1994 with his three-on-three.

    Then came Saqlain with his two hat-tricks; both against Zimbabwe in 1996 and 1999. His feat was followed by Muhammad Sami in 2002 when he caught one LBW and bowled the next two batsmen to bag a hat-trick at Sharjah — the last one for Pakistan by any bowler till today.



    http://tribune.com.pk/story/1120685/june-11-saqlain-bagged-second-three-three/
     
  5. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Series, 4th Match: England v Pakistan at Lord's, Jun 12, 2001

    Match scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/66277.html

    Frustrations mount for England as Pakistan make it two in a row


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    The Pakistan players show their displeasure that umpire Palmer has called a Saqlain wide
    Photo © CricInfo

    London: It's been often stated that the future is an extension of the past and that the present spans the two. The past has had both wonderful and disturbing memories for Pakistan cricket teams touring England. And, even though the last Test series in 1996 was saved the acrimonious interactions of the 1992 tour, unwarranted ugliness raised its head more then once during the ongoing series of Tests and ODI's. If Old Trafford and Edgbaston were the past and best forgotten, Palmer's wide ball signal nearly brought it up again. Mercifully, Pakistan won; otherwise one would have witnessed unwarranted sights that would have taken away the gloss of a really well contested match.


    Pakistan won by two runs, statistically very narrow, appreciatively larger in terms of heart and mind. Here was a team defending a moderate and according to Pakistani and British experts, a poor total to defend on a batsmen friendly batting strip. And with Pakistan only having one genuine, established fast bowler, 242/8 was far removed from what Pakistan wanted, and much nearer winning shores for England struggling to record their first win in this Triangular contest.

    Pakistan won, not because England collapsed under pressure, but because its 'future', the team of tomorrow, rose to the occasion and held their nerves. Imagine a centurion, the like of Trescothick, losing his nerve with fewer then a stroke to win a match for England. The Pakistan team has shown yet again that they have the poise and patience to extricate themselves from trying and testing conditions with a flair lacking from the armoury of the opponents.



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    Inzamam-ul-Haq looks back at the stumps flying high after being bowled for a duck
    Photo © AFP

    Toss losing Pakistan went to bat minus two of the stars of yesterdays; Saeed Anwar, unavailable due extenuating circumstances, and Wasim Akram still nursing a sore shoulder. And showed it had what it takes to be classy winners. And what winners? With no contribution coming yet again from the bat of Inzamam-ul-Haq. The stars of tomorrow Yousuf Youhana and Younis Khan, batted Pakistan out of hopelessness and thereafter the spin and guile of Saqlain Mushtaq, Shahid Afridi complimented Waqar's opening efforts, to stall yet again, an England effort to reach the shore.


    Yousuf Youhana already has the credentials to support his batting. Younis Khan though, is fast blossoming into a 'Mr Reliable'. And his innings of 41 from 56 balls an apt reminder that one can score against the most penetrative bowling without being flamboyant or rash. His innings did not contain any boundary. Youhana's elevation to No.3 spot, though two matches late, was an opportune decision. And he endorsed his class through a very well planned innings of concentration and selective stroke-play. 7th out for 81, Youhana partnered Younis Khan for 80 runs and added another 50 with Rashid Latif. Then, Pakistan did well to score 35 runs from the last 27 balls, thanks yet again to Azhar Mahmood, who may not be bowling to his promise and potential, yet bats convincingly to put runs on the board, Cardiff notwithstanding.

    Yet another loss to Pakistan at Lord's on Tuesday has more or less made England the 'bridesmaid' for June 23, the scheduled final. And even if England prove an exception to the rule by upsetting favourites Australia, twice in the forthcoming matches, a very unlikely happening, they may still miss out due a poor run rate. This is England's 8th loss since that win over Pakistan at Karachi and fourth against Pakistan in succession.



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    Marcus Trescothick celebrates his wonderful century
    Photo © CricInfo

    Through this win, Pakistan has drawn a lot of confidence. This 'future' looking team did them proud through this achievement where one and all thought 242/8 was a poor total to defend. It certainly looked all the more poorer through that Tescothick 137 that nearly gave England the much sought yet elusive win. It augurs well for Pakistan and reflects a potentially greater significance, for it was achieved without the super stars. England's 8th defeat in a row was yet another blow to morale. For Pakistan, this win erases those unhappy moments of Lord's 1992 when they lost to England by 79 runs.


    Umpiring has been consistently inconsistent and even though Saleem Elahi was unfortunate earlier on, KE Palmer nearly 'recreated' Old Trafford, 1992. Here's hoping conscience rules the hearts of the umpires in coming matches and they are also alert enough to spot no balls.

    Pakistan plays Australia next at Chester-le-Street and certainly would feel comfortable if Australia triumphs over England at Old Trafford, Thursday.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/pakistan/content/story/103136.html?object=66277

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  6. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Prudential World Cup, 7th Match: Australia v Pakistan at Nottingham, Jun 13-14, 1979

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65055.html

    Both Majid Khan and Asif Iqbal scored 61

    Majid Khan then took a 3fer as Pakistan went on to beat the Aussies by 89 runs.

    This was the first ever one day international between the two sides

    At Nottingham, June 13, 14. Pakistan won by 89 runs after Hughes, who won the toss, put in Pakistan. Interruptions through rain divided the match into two days, there being time at the end of the first day for Pakistan to send down five overs, from which Darling and Hilditch made 17 without being parted. Both teams lost the services of a key fast bowler, Pakistan being without Sarfraz, suffering from a strain, and Australia missing Hogg, who was laid low with bronchial trouble. In the event Australia laboured under the bigger handicap for although Hogg's replacement, Porter, gave little away, the usually reliable Hurst produced five wides, four no balls and several long hops in his first spell.

    Consequently, Pakistan got away to a flying start. Majid punished anything loose with much severity and the opening stand realised 99 runs. Cosier put in some good spells, but there was some fine hitting and running by Asif and Miandad who put on 87 in fourteen overs. This was followed by Asif, Wasim Raja and Imran scoring 47 from the last five overs.

    Next day, Hilditch gave an impressive display for Australia, but the loss of Darling in the eighth over proved a setback from which Australia never recovered. Sikander soon accounted for Border and Hughes before the left-handed Yallop joined Hilditch in a stand of 71 in 21 overs, but the scoring-rate was not fast enough to worry Pakistan. In the end, the persistent medium-pace of Mudassar dismissed Hilditch. Asif was named Man of the Match for his brilliant 61, his accurate bowling, and his skilful captaincy.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/150313.html
     
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  7. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    ICC World Twenty20, 18th Match, Group F: New Zealand v Pakistan at The Oval, Jun 13, 2009

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/wt202009/engine/current/match/356008.html

    Charismatic Pakistan live to fight

    Pakistan have bitten another bullet, in style. At the toss Younis Khan seemed relieved, almost trying to suppress laughter, when he called this a do-or-die match. It was as if he liked that there was no choice left, and his team showed they relished being in such a situation. By the end of the night, Pakistan had done, and left dying for another time. Abdul Razzaq, formerly a pariah and now making a comeback to official cricket after two years, struck with the fourth ball he bowled, and then in his third over to skittle the New Zealand top order, which was followed by Umar Gul's destruction. Gul was on a hat-trick twice and also became the first bowler to take a five-for in Twenty20 internationals.

    Those two spells sandwiched a period when the spinners choked the life out of the middle order as a weakened New Zealand, missing Jesse Ryder and Ross Taylor, stumbled to a meagre total on a belter of a pitch at The Oval. Debutant opener Shahzaib Hasan threatened to finish the match in a hurry, but the New Zealand spinners did well to delay the end of the match, and make sure Pakistan didn't run away with a hefty net run-rate, which will come handy in case New Zealand beat Sri Lanka.

    How Pakistan would want to thank BCCI for the "amnesty" it accorded the ICL players. For Pakistan had bowled yet another ordinary first over; the first and last balls, from Mohammad Aamer, were boundaries, in between there was poor fielding and no dot balls. Had even Razzaq got off to a poor start, Pakistan would have had to bring Gul on early, which is not their original game plan. But Razzaq got Brendon McCullum before he could cause severe damage, and then Martin Guptill with a trademark straight delivery that the batsman missed. He exulted with arms aloft, more of a reaction than you can usually draw from Razzaq. Welcome back, Pakistan cricket was poorer without Razzaq.

    Razzaq's first wicket was the first dot ball of the innings, but by the time Aamer and Razzaq were done with their three-over spells, New Zealand had barely doubled their score at 1.3 overs. Time, then, for spinners to come on. For the first time with the medium-pacers having put them in a favourable position. Time also it was for the fielders to raise their game, which they did. Diving saves, hustling fielders, and accurate bowling meant that Scott Styris and Jacob Oram struggled even to rotate the strike.

    When it got too much for Oram, he stepped out to Shahid Afridi, in the 10th over, and skied a faster delivery. At the end of that over, Afridi's figures read 2-0-3-1. And because the opening bowlers did their job, Younis had Gul saved up for the last eight overs. At 72 for 4 after 12 overs, New Zealand had their task cut out, facing the yorkers from Gul and trying to accelerate.

    Styris tried to put Gul off his rhythm right in his first over, and all he managed was a top edge to long-on. But this was Afridi's moment. He ran from mid-on, his eye on the ball falling over his head, his hands stretching out at the right moment and finishing the catch metres inside the boundary. Pakistan fielding had come a long way from being the laughing stocks of the tournament.

    Following that dismissal, it was all Gul, his accuracy and his late swing. Peter McGlashan tried to paddle him next ball, but was undone by the in-dipper. James Franklin saved the hat-trick, but couldn't deny the irresistible Gul for long. With a change of ends, he cleaned up Nathan McCullum and Franklin with straight and fast bowling. Kyle Mills, though, fell to a slower one, giving Gul the five-for and another chance for a hat-trick. The hat-trick didn't come, but New Zealand managed just 27 since Gul's introduction to the attack. Once the euphoria of this performance dies, Pakistan will want to thank the man returning to international cricket for allowing them to go ahead with their preferred bowling strategy.

    It was the best environment for a 19-year-old making his debut. Shahzaib was eased into the chase, Kamran Akmal facing the first 12 balls of the innings. Turned out Shahzaib didn't need any shielding. He got off the mark with a free-hit, but showed glimpses of his potential in the subsequent overs, lofting Daniel Vettori for a six down the ground, and cutting and pulling with aplomb during his quick 35.

    With Afridi batting responsibly, Vettori's guile and athletic fielding only fought the inevitable.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wt202009/content/story/408872.html?object=356008

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  8. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    I remember being in the crowd for this game. One of the best I have watched live. The atmosphere was just electric. Great performance from the team. Was no looking back after this win
     
  9. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    1st Test: Sri Lanka v Pakistan at Colombo (SSC), Jun 14-17, 2000

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/63885.html

    Arshad Khan took a 4fer in the first innings

    Akram rescued Pakistan in reply with 78.

    Akram then took a 5fer in the 2nd innings

    Pakistan went on to win the game by 5 wickets

    Akram went past 400 test wickets in this game

    Waqar went past 300 test wickets

    Toss: Sri Lanka. Test debut: C. R. D. Fernando.

    Wasim Akram upstaged Sri Lanka's 100th-Test celebrations with a virtuoso performance. On the third day, he kept Pakistan in contention with a fighting innings of 78, adding 90 for the last wicket with Arshad Khan to restrict Sri Lanka's first-innings lead to seven. Next, he demolished the home side's second innings with his 25th five-wicket return in Tests, including his 400th Test wicket, and set Pakistan up for victory inside four days.

    With the start being delayed until three o'clock because of the wet outfield, and bad light bringing an early close, the first day contained only 42 overs. Atapattu, promoted to vice-captain, took three hours to reach fifty, but responsible batting was essential after Waqar Younis removed Jayasuriya and Arnold in successive overs. Jayawardene, the former deputy, was also steadfast, batting three and three-quarter hours, but Waqar and Arshad worked away at the innings. When Wasim caught Muralitharan at mid-on to end the innings, Waqar in his 65th Test became the third Pakistan bowler to take 300 wickets, after Wasim himself and Imran Khan.

    Pakistan were batting just before tea on the second day, and after losing five for 17 next morning to Muralitharan and Zoysa they were down to their last pair before lunch. Murali already had his 19th five-wicket haul and Sri Lanka were looking forward to extending their lead through the afternoon. Instead, Wasim and Arshad were still there at tea, having added 87; their eventual 90 together, of which Arshad's share was nine, set a tenth-wicket record for Tests between these countries. By his usual batting standards, Wasim's 78 off 204 balls was a circumspect affair, and the way he shielded his partner for three hours showed his commitment to the team effort. Nor was he finished with the Sri Lankans.

    He began their second innings with a piece of history of his own: Arnold, caught at second slip, was his 400th Test wicket. He wrapped it up with a clatter of wickets, removing Vaas and Zoysa with successive balls and firing out debutant seamer Dilhara Fernando in his next over. It was Wasim at his wicked best, swinging the ball fast and late and hitting the seam. His other wicket was Ranatunga, himself making history as the first player to appear in his country's first and 100th Test matches. But that was Ranatunga's only mark. In the first innings, he was run out for six by Mushtaq Ahmed's direct hit; second time round, he made just seven. Bundled out for a shocking 123, the Sri Lankans left Pakistan more than four and a half sessions to make 131.

    They looked to be cruising as Mohammad Wasim and Yousuf Youhana reached 50 on the stroke of tea. Immediately after the break, though, Muralitharan removed them both in three balls, and soon accounted for Inzamam-ul-Haq. Murali was turning the ball prodigiously and, with more runs to play with, would have proved a handful. However, Wasim, batting higher up the order than usual, was already settling in, and his presence calmed Pakistan's nerves as he guided them to victory.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/153927.html

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    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
  10. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Prudential World Cup, 12th Match: Pakistan v Sri Lanka at Nottingham, Jun 14, 1975

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65046.html

    Pakistan thrashed the Lankans

    Scoring 330/6 (Zaheer Abbas 97 off 89, Majid Khan 84, Sadiq Mohammad 74)

    Sri Lanka were then bowled out for 138 as Pakistan won by 192 runs

    At Nottingham, June 14. Pakistan won by 192 runs. Sri Lanka optimistically invited Pakistan to bat on winning the toss and by doing so committed themselves to an arduous time in the field. Against an attack lacking in pace, Sadiq and Majid built an opening partnership of 159 runs. The departure of Sadiq for 74 paved the way for a polished innings by Zaheer who gave a delightful display and was unlucky to miss a century by three runs. At the end of the 60 overs Pakistan"s total of 330 for six was only four runs short of the competition record set by England against India.

    Sri Lanka showed little ability to play leg spin bowling and their innings came to an inglorious end in the 51st over for a paltry 138. Apart from a useful 30 by Tennekoon and a defiant late 26 by De Silva there was little basic application by the batsmen. Zaheer was named Man of the Match.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/150276.html
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
  11. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Kitply Cup, Final: India v Pakistan at Dhaka, Jun 14, 2008

    Match scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/kitplycup/engine/current/match/345471.html

    Butt and Younis inspire Pakistan to title

    A familiar nemesis and a battle-scarred warhorse inspired a downcast bunch to brave the odds and hand Pakistan their first multi-nation title in more than five years. In front of their board chairman, who had lashed out after their previous loss, and their coach, who was criticised for his overly optimistic statements, Pakistan turned in an intense, yet controlled, performance to clinch the Kitply Cup and head home upbeat for the Asia Cup.

    In an era of slam-bang cricket, Pakistan reverted to a strategy straight out of the early 1990s: win the toss, bat, see off the new ball, keep wickets, accelerate and launch a big score. From 75 for 1 in the 20th over, on a pitch where the ball appeared to be stopping on the batsmen, they soared to 315. Salman Butt cracked his fifth hundred against India, and seventh overall, but it was Younis Khan's pumped-up century that charmed - under the cosh after his two successive ducks, he chose the big stage for the comeback.

    India started well but came apart in the face of the middle-over onslaught. Eight bowlers were tried but Pakistan made the most of the lack of a fifth specialist, going after the part-time spinners even though the field was spread. Piyush Chawla came into this game on the back of a morale-boosting four-wicket haul against Pakistan but ended up having a harrowing time, finishing with the most expensive spell by an Indian spinner in an ODI.

    All wasn't lost yet - India had chased down a similar total against Pakistan in Dhaka ten years ago - but there was no batsman, or partnership, to hold the innings together. A constantly mounting run-rate forced some poor shot selection and Yuvraj Singh's wicket, just when he was settled enough to guide the chase, all but shut the door. And just when Mahendra Singh Dhoni raised visions of a robbery, Umar Gul produced a masterclass in death-over bowling to seal the deal. His two early wickets, earned with bouncers, were probably more important but it was the final two, nailed with yorker-length balls, that will stick in the mind. The yorker that crashed into the base of Chawla's leg stump came with the effect of a hammer knocking in the final nail in the coffin.

    Vital contributions ensured India stayed in the fight but what India could have done with was a couple of batsmen with the innings-building capabilities of Butt and Younis. The pitch wasn't conducive to strokeplay early and both bided their time through the Powerplays. Once set, there was little the bowlers could do and the blistering 240 Pakistan crashed in 30 overs made up for the lost time. This didn't come about through wild bashing; rather it was because of a pair who understood the nuances of the one-day game and illustrated the value of pacing an innings.



    [​IMG]
    After two successive ducks, Younis Khan came up with a special 99-ball 108 in the final© AFP



    One needs to go back more than 25 years when a Pakistani second-wicket pair added more than 200 against India. The present duo couldn't match the rate set by Mohsin Khan and Zaheer Abbas, who belted 205 in just 27 overs, but did enough to set a rock-solid platform.

    Younis raised his bat to the crowd twice: the first when he had a laugh at himself for getting off the mark, on the back of two successive ducks, and the second, a more emphatic celebration, when he brought up his century. It was truly a Younis special, the sort you expect from a batsmen who's used to the backs-to-the-wall feeling. At no point was there a shortage of intent, whether he was drilling through the covers or pulling over midwicket or hustling between the stumps or even paddling fine.

    If Younis nudged and glided, Butt punched and slapped. He didn't work on subtle glances and focused instead on forcing the ball through the gaps. He pulled out some of his signature strokes, like the slap through point and flick towards square leg, but the shot that defined this knock was the slog-sweep, whistling balls over midwicket. India, bizarrely, never plugged the gap - even after both batsmen peppered the midwicket boundary - and conceded 84 runs to the duo in that region.

    Yuvraj chose to play in a different sort of V - between midwicket and fine leg. He was intent on sweeping the spinners and the packed off-side field prompted him to try out the slog-sweep, the flick, the conventional sweep and the vertical back-drive. He survived a close lbw appeal and a Fawad Alam caught-and-bowled chance but couldn't gauge the low bounce from Shahid Afridi, snicking to the wicketkeeper.

    Dhoni held the lower order together and, typically, he chose to rotate the strike as the tailenders went for their shots. Irfan Pathan struggled to get his timing right and both Praveen Kumar and Chawla had no clue against Gul. Dhoni's two late sixes kept the flame flickering but, with nine wickets down and needing to go for broke, he holed out to deep point. He might have left it too late but the real damage was probably done much earlier in the evening.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/kitplycup/content/story/354760.html?object=345471

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    Last edited: Jun 14, 2016
  12. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Pakistan tour of Australia, 2nd ODI: Australia v Pakistan at Melbourne (Docklands), Jun 15, 2002

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/64776.html


    Nerveless Younis forces series to decider


    Stung by a heavy defeat in the opening game, Pakistan has forced Super Challenge II into a series-deciding clash at the 'Gabba next Wednesday after registering a hard-earned two wicket win over Australia in Melbourne tonight. Spirited bowling was complemented by patient batting as the tourists dug deep into their reserves of skill and commitment to secure victory with seven balls to spare.

    Unlike Wednesday's series-opener, this was a high-standard encounter. As a contest, it had much to offer too, with Pakistan waiting until the last half-hour of a prolonged arm wrestle to genuinely secure its win.

    The sophisticated strokemaking talent of Younis Khan (56*) was the key, delightful footwork and crisp hitting allowing him to persistently guide the ball through and over the field on a day when almost every batsman struggled. Crucial, too, was his patience in a difficult period in the middle of the innings during which spinners Shane Warne (2/49) and Darren Lehmann (1/17) rudely interrupted the progress of Yousuf Youhana (29), Rashid Latif (16) and Shahid Afridi (3).

    Pakistan's pursuit of the paltry Australian total of 167 had sputtered into difficulty at various stages of the evening session as wickets were frittered away at regular intervals. But the young right hander was able to play the lead role in partnerships of 35 with Latif; 19 with Wasim Akram (10); and 18 with Waqar Younis (8*) to haul his team back from the potential ruin posed by scorelines of 3/21 and 5/85.

    Earlier, the direct hit run out of Saeed Anwar (0) from mid off, and the departures of Imran Nazir (6) and Azhar Mahmood (4) in the space of a single Brett Lee (2/44) over, had posed grave threats to the satisfactory progress of the Pakistan innings.

    In truth, though, Australia should never have been given a chance to win after a typically explosive opening to the match from Akram.

    Amid cold conditions, the teams had played a slow-burning match to mark the beginning of the series three days ago. As Akram (3/18) set to work, though, this one could barely have exploded into life any faster.

    The first serious questions of the afternoon - not to mention the prayers of the series' promoters - had been answered when Lee and Shoaib Akhtar were included in the respective elevens. There still remain few players as pleasurable to watch in full flight as Akram, however, and it was the 36-year-old former Pakistan captain who duly stole all the headlines once play commenced.

    In a frenzied beginning, the redoubtable left arm paceman struck with the first and third deliveries of the match, initially finding a feint outside edge as he drew Adam Gilchrist (0) into nibbling at an outswinger of exceptional quality. Ricky Ponting (0) then made a similarly forlorn exit when a defensive shot caused the ball to jam off a combination of bat and pad, and loop in a gentle low parabola to the jubilant bowler.

    Fellow members of the upper order should have been quick to join their captain and vice-captain among the ranks of the fallen.

    But Jimmy Maher (12) survived a pair of desperately close lbw and run out decisions and Damien Martyn (56) encountered two anxious moments of his own, top edging the ball just short of fine leg as he hooked at Akram with his score at 3 and then benefiting from a controversial decision with his score only four runs advanced.

    A mistimed pull at Akram had sent the ball toward Waqar at mid on, and the Pakistan skipper initially appeared to have clutched the ball cleanly just above the turf. Neither Martyn nor umpire Darrell Hair, standing only a short distance away from Waqar, seemed fully convinced, though, and an ensuing series of replays failed to shed further light on the catch's validity for third umpire Simon Taufel.

    Pakistan paid a heavy price in that Martyn's escape set the stage for a defiant 66-run stand for the fourth wicket with Lehmann (31).

    On a pitch again offering consistent pace and bounce - as well as appreciable turn at times - it was only when Afridi (3/28) proceeded to encourage Martyn to cut a low catch to backward point that the tourists redressed the balance. The leg spinner swiftly made further important breaches of the home team's defences when he trapped Shane Watson (8) and Warne (1) on the line of the crease.

    Akhtar (2/30), the speed of whose deliveries peaked at the match-high reading of 151.9 kilometres per hour, then mopped up the remnants of the innings by bowling Andy Bichel (7) and having Michael Bevan (30) caught behind while cutting.

    The Australians ultimately lost 5/29 in the closing stages of the afternoon session to pair a poor finish with the disastrous start that they had made after winning the toss.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/story/117840.html?object=64776

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  13. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    ICC World Twenty20, 21st Match, Group F: Ireland v Pakistan at The Oval, Jun 15, 2009

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/wt202009/engine/current/match/356012.html

    Akmal, Ajmal take Pakistan to semi-finals

    Requiring a win to move into the semi-finals, Pakistan accomplished just that with an efficient performance, easing past Ireland by 39 runs at The Oval. The margin was also sufficient to lift their net run-rate to 1.19, ensuring there's no way both New Zealand and Sri Lanka can finish with as many points and a higher rate.

    Pakistan's last World Cup game against Ireland had ended in grief, but here they seemed aware of the threat posed by their feisty opponents: after winning the toss Pakistan played within themselves but yet managed 159, thanks largely to a well-paced 57 by Kamran Akmal. Ireland's batting is clearly their weaker suit, and considering their highest in the tournament so far is only 138, a target of 160 was always likely to be a tough ask. And so it proved, as they finished on 120.

    Apart from Akmal, none of the other Pakistan batsmen got big scores, but there were reasonable partnerships for almost every wicket, ensuring there was no repeat of the collapse which had knocked Pakistan out of the 2007 World Cup. Ireland, as usual, made the opposition work for their runs, with Boyd Rankin being the stand-out bowler, but the inability to get wickets meant Pakistan finished with 27 more than they had managed in the 50-over game in Jamaica a couple of years back.

    Akmal held the innings together with a measured knock. The confidence of having scored runs in the earlier games was clearly on display, and he was decisive with his footwork and generally sound with his shot selection. He began with a pick-up shot over midwicket for six off the hapless Trent Johnston, and continued to play both the meaty shots and the deft ones: a scoop over fine leg off Alex Cusack went for four, as did crisp drives through cover off the left-arm spin of Regan West.

    Shahzaib Hasan and Shahid Afridi, promoted up the order to No.3, didn't go on to get bigger knocks but they provided the early impetus. Shahzaib kept lofting the pitched-up deliveries over the infield with varying degrees of success till his luck finally ran out, while Afridi thrashed Cusack and West through the off side before Kyle McCallan deceived him with a superb slower, tossed up, offbreak.

    Along with Rankin's fiery burst with the new ball, McCallan's clever bowling was the highlight for Ireland in the field. Rankin kept it tight and was desperately unlucky not to pick up a wicket, while McCallan's outstanding flight and change of pace ensured none of the batsmen dominated him. Johnston had a nightmare game, conceding 20 in his second over and 12 in his third, as batsmen picked him off their legs quite effortlessly, but even he redeemed himself with an excellent fourth over, picking up Akmal with a yorker and conceding only four runs.

    Ireland gave little away in the field, and yet a target of 160 was always beyond them. William Porterfield fought gustily for his 36-ball 40, but hit his first four in the tenth over of the innings, by which time the asking rate had already climbed to nine and a half. Paul Stirling, playing his first game of the tournament, showed some promise in his 17, which included an impeccable cover-drive to get off the mark, but the big difference between the two sides was in their boundary-hitting abilities - Pakistan struck 13 fours and four sixes; Ireland only managed six fours.

    Pakistan's bowlers were all disciplined, with Mohammad Aamer getting rid of the dangerous Niall O'Brien early. Afridi and Saeed Ajmaloffered few scoring opportunities, while Umar Gul continued from where he had left off against New Zealand, knocking over the stumps thrice, including once off a free-hit ball, and then scoring a direct hit to run out West.

    A dropped catch by Abdul Razzaq late in the innings was a small blot, but overall it was a polished performance by a team which is increasingly looking like a sound bet for the title.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wt202009/content/story/409080.html?object=356012

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  14. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Prudential World Cup, 15th Match: Pakistan v Sri Lanka at Leeds, Jun 16, 1983

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65078.html

    Pakistan were 43/5 at one point before a partnership of 144 between Imran Khan and Shahid Mahboob rescued the innings.

    Imran made 102 and Shahid 77 as Pakistan posted 235/7.

    Abdul Qadir then took 5/44 as Pakistan won the game by 11 runs

    At Leeds, June 16. Pakistan won by 11 runs. Twice during the day Sri Lanka seemed within sight of victory - in the morning when Pakistan, having been put in, found the ball moving about disconcertingly and were 43 for five, and again in the evening when the Sri Lankan third-wicket pair were moving steadily to within 74 runs of the required score. Pakistan were saved first by Imran's 102 not out and his sixth-wicket stand of 144 with Shahid, and later by the leg-spinner Qadir who took three wickets in eight balls as Sri Lanka were gathering themselves for a final dash for victory. Seven wickets fell for 37 runs and a last-wicket stand of 25 by De Mel and John, who needed 37 in the last six overs, merely emphasised Sri Lanka's lost opportunity.

    Man of the Match: Abdul Qadir.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/150422.html
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    ICC World Cup, 1st SF: New Zealand v Pakistan at Manchester, Jun 16, 1999

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65232.html

    Suberb display from Pakistan. First restricting the Kiwis to 241/7 and then chasing down the score with ease and winning by 9 wickets and booking a place in the final.

    Saeed Anwar top scored with 113*. Wajhatullah Wasti scored 84 as he and Anwar put on 194 for the first wicket

    Toss: New Zealand.

    Pakistan burst into the final after an opening stand of 194 between Saeed Anwar and Wajahatullah Wasti, a World Cup first-wicket record. They seemed quite capable of finishing the job undivided until Wasti holed out in the 41st over. Anwar pushed on to a second successive century - his 17th in one-day internationals, equalling Desmond Haynes and behind only Sachin Tendulkar. With Ijaz Ahmed smashing 28 in 21 balls, victory was delayed only by a small pitch invasion, six runs early, which stopped play for ten minutes. Then, when Anwar lofted the ball towards long-off, the crowd could be contained no longer. Twose abandoned an attempt at a running catch as the players raced to safety. Though the two runs required were never actually completed, they were awarded anyway. Ecstatic Pakistani fans let off fireworks and paraded flags, banners and a cardboard cut-out of Nelson Mandela (who had retired from the South African presidency earlier in the day). Officials, who had expected trouble for the India match eight days earlier, lost control when their guard was down. New Zealand captain Fleming called for stricter security, raising the controversial topic of fencing in spectators.

    His side had built a decent total of 241, though that owed 47 to extras recklessly scattered by Pakistan. The best stand came from Fleming and Twose, who added 94 before Shoaib Akhtar bowled Fleming with a breathtaking yorker -uprooting his leg stump at 92 mph. Shoaib broke the wicket in each of his three spells, but both captains identified that strike, his second, as the turning point. He showed pace does matter in one-day cricket, Wasim Akram proudly declared.

    Man of the Match: Shoaib Akhtar. Attendance: 22,002.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/151524.html

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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Pakistan tour of Sri Lanka, 1st Test: Sri Lanka v Pakistan at Galle, Jun 17-21, 2015

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/860263.html

    Rain washed out day 1
    SL were 178/3 on day 2
    SL were bowled out for 300 on day 3 (Babar 3-64, Wahab 3-74)
    Pakistan ended day 3 struggling 118/5
    Shafiq and Sarfraz and Zulfiqar Babar then led the fightback on day 4 helping Pakistan post 417 (Shafiq 131, Sarfraz 96, Zulfiqar 56)
    SL were 63/2 at stumps
    Yasir Shah took 7/76 as SL were bowled out for 206
    Hafeez 46*, Shehzad 43* then chased down the target with ease to set up a 10 wicket win

    Day 1
    Rain washes out first day in Galle

    Day 2
    Silva, Sangakkara make fifties on curtailed day

    Day 3
    Sri Lanka on top after making 300

    Day 4
    Pakistan strike after taking lead

    Day 5
    Yasir seven-for sets up emphatic Pakistan win


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  17. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    NatWest Series, 7th Match: England v Pakistan at Leeds, Jun 17, 2001

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/66279.html

    Waqar and Razzaq steer Pakistan to a fabulous victory

    Pakistan overwhelmed England from the word `go'. With a magical record haul of 7 wickets for 36 runs Waqar Younis brought England to ruin. At a miserable 58 for 7 England was down in the dumps when Ben Hollioake playing a heroic innings of 53 lifted his side to a respectable 156.

    Despite a slow but steady start, Pakistan secured victory through an unusual concession by Alec Stewart, the England skipper. When the score was 153 for 4, the crowd invasion made further play impossible and the match was conceded. While Abdur Razzaq played a sparkling innings of 75, Saeed Anwar and Yousuf Youhana contributed useful 24 runs each.

    Earlier, Waqar sent England in to bat on a pitch likely to seam. England did not appear to have come out of the ghost of defeats suffered earlier in the tournament. Their shaky start was evident from the manner Waqar Younis shattered Marcus Trescothick's stumps on the very first ball of the day, a full ball that went between bat and pad.

    It was Waqar's day to strike like lightening and demolish England with his magnificent spell of bowling. He made short work of Nick Knight (9) prompting him to offer a catch to Shahid Afridi at point. Michael Vaughan, caught by Younis Khan in the slips was the next to depart. England was 30 for 3.

    Continuing with his devastating spell he caused a procession of England's batting clinching 4 more wickets in a row. The victims were Owais Shah (3), Paul Collingwood (0), Alec Stewart (18) and Dominic Cork (4). England seemed sunk at 58 for 7.

    An interesting event that deserves mention was, before Inzamam finally caught Owais Shah in the slips, the umpire disallowed a confident lbw appeal. `It was plumb in front of the wicket' remarked the commentators. More surprising was that the electronic indicators were not brought in action to show passage of the ball. One wonders if these devices are designed to act only when the ball is missing the stumps?

    With his magical haul of 7 for 36 Waqar joins the galaxy of stars at the second spot after Muralitharan and followed by Aaqib Javed, and Winston Davis, sharing the world record of 7 wickets in a one day internationals.


    Luckily for England, Ben Hollioake and Darren Gough stemmed the rot raising the score to 100 in 27 overs. After a partnership of 67 runs, Hollioake was bowled by Afridi after a defiant innings of 53. England was now at a better looking 125 for 8.

    The tail-enders having saved the side from disgrace, England was all out for a respectable total of 156 in 45 overs. Darren Gough remained not out after playing a courageous innings of 40. With a record tally of 7 for 36 Waqar Younis who proved the chief tormentor, was virtually unplayable and had bowled unchanged. Shahid Afridi and Azhar Mahmood claimed one wicket each while new comer Fazal-e-Akbar bowled a tidy spell beating the bat on many occasions.

    Chasing an apparently easy target, Pakistan's start was not very promising either. Unable to resist the temptation of flashing his bat, Shahid Afridi (2) snicked one from Darren Gough into the safe hands of Alec Stewart. Gough struck again when he got Saeed Anwar out exactly in the same manner after he had scored a useful 24. Pakistan was 2 down for only 34 runs on the board.


    With 50 of the innings coming in the 20th over it was a depressing start, especially when regular batsmen like Yousuf Youhana and Abdur Razzaq were at the crease. Playing with the strategy of keeping wickets intact they opened up later hoisting the 100 in 30 overs.

    Feeling secure and confident of a win they started playing brisk shots. In the process, Razzaq even punished Alan Mullally for a straight six. Youhana was out after scoring 24 useful runs and Pakistan at 128 for 3 was striding fast towards the target. Hitting all round the wicket, Razzaq was in total command of the game.

    While only 10 runs short of the victory target, Razzaq threw away his wicket chasing a ball from Cork well outside off stump, smartly caught by Alec Stewart, after playing a fine innings of 75.

    On the fifth ball of the 40th over with the score at 149, Azhar Mahmood flicked one to long leg and the crowd ran on thinking mistakenly it was all over. After the melee England conceded victory and the stroke was recorded as a four.

    Pakistan achieved victory by 6 wickets. For his masterly bowling, Waqar Younis was declared `Man of the Match'. With this 10th successive defeat, England is perhaps in dire need of brushing up skills in one-day cricket.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/pakistan/content/story/103303.html?object=66279

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  18. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Pakistan tour of England and Scotland, 1st Match: England v Pakistan at Manchester, Jun 17, 2003

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65029.html

    Great game that went down to the wire

    Shoaib Maliks 3/26 helped Pakistan restrict England to 204/9

    England fought hard but Hafeez's 69 helped Pakistan over the line and winning by 2 wickets with just 4 balls to spare


    At Manchester, June 17 (day/night). Pakistan won by two wickets. (br> Toss: England.
    One-day international debuts: R. Clarke, A. McGrath, J. O. Troughton.

    A see-sawing, low-scoring thriller finally went Pakistan's way after some inspired bowling from Anderson and Gough late on gave England hope. Cruising at 116 for one in pursuit of 205, Pakistan nearly made a mess of it. Vaughan ran out Yousuf Youhana, Anderson returned after an early pasting to claim three wickets, and when Gough struck twice in five balls, it was 194 for eight. But Abdul Razzaq found a nerveless ally in Mohammad Sami and pulled the winning runs with four balls to spare. Without a patient 69 from the opener, Mohammad Hafeez, things might have been different. Earlier, England had struggled on a slow pitch after a whippet-like start from Trescothick and Solanki, one of six players who were not part of England's last one-day team, against Australia in the World Cup just over three months earlier. From the side that trudged off from that let-down, Knight, Hussain, Stewart, Caddick and White had apparently gone from one-day internationals for ever, and Collingwood was injured. Vaughan, the new captain, could see a big score beckoning at 152 for four in the 32nd over, but Flintoff picked out deep square leg, and Rikki Clarke was bowled second ball by the thrifty Shoaib Malik. Clarke made amends when he dismissed Imran Nazir with a long-hop to become the first Englishman since Geoff Arnold in 1972 to take a wicket with his first ball in one-day internationals. England, though, had left their fightback a little too late. More than a thousand Pakistani supporters surged on to the outfield as the winning run was being scored in a display of the kind of over-exuberance cricket was hoping it had quashed. ECB officials considered extra security measures and renewed their call to the government to make pitch invasions a criminal offence. Seven of their security men were diverted from crowd control by the urgent necessity of ejecting one of cricket's most experienced photographers, Graham Morris, who was taking a picture of the sunset from the press box roof.

    Man of the Match: Mohammad Hafeez. Attendance: 18,208; receipts £441,902.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/155819.html
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
  19. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Pakistan tour of England, 2nd Test: England v Pakistan at Lord's, Jun 18-21, 1992

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/63576.html

    Waqar Younis 5/91 in the first innings as England were bowled out for 255
    Aamir Sohail top scored for Pakistan with 73, Asif Mujtaba (59) Salim Malik (55) as Pakistan scored 293

    Akram then took 4/66 in the 2nd innings as England were bowled out for 175

    Pakistan then made hard work of the chase but thanks to an unbeaten 45 from Akram they got over the finish line to win by 2 wickets

    Toss: England.

    Wasim Akram drove Salisbury through the covers at 6.40 on Sunday evening to give Pakistan a one-match lead in the series and conclude an astonishing day of Test cricket. Seventeen wickets tumbled and the close-to-capacity crowd could be forgiven for thinking this was a one-day final. Pakistan saw near-certain victory evaporate into near-certain defeat before Wasim and Waqar Younis- as a batting partnership for once - defied England's depleted and tiring attack for the final nerve-racking hour. That last boundary ended England's brave fightback, and provoked some of the most emotional scenes ever seen at Lord's as the Pakistan touring party raced on to the playing surface in celebration.

    Wasim's elegant drive also saved the Test and County Cricket Board from facing the wrath of a frustrated crowd for the second successive Test. Had Salisbury bowled a maiden, proceedings for the day would have been concluded. The battle would have resumed on Monday morning with England needing two wickets to tie the Test and Pakistan wanting one run to win. In fact, it would not have been the TCCB's fault: the Pakistanis had rejected the customary provision for an extra half-hour before the tour began. It was not a great Test match, but Sunday was a great Test day, and it would have been dreadful if this ding-dong battle had not been resolved there and then because of a technicality.

    The influence of Pakistan's heroes, Wasim and Waqar- with ball and bat - was all the more remarkable because there were serious doubts over both a few weeks earlier. Wasim missed the First Test because of shin trouble, while Waqar used Edgbaston for little more than a trial run after the stress fracture which kept him out of the World Cup. Less than a fortnight later, they put Pakistan in command of this Test with 13 wickets, and then held their nerves for a famous victory. Wasim had proved his fitness by taking 16 wickets in the conclusive victories over Nottinghamshire and Northamptonshire between the Tests. His return in place of Ata-Ur-Rehman was Pakistan's only change from Edgbaston. England's bowling had been much criticised for its lack of variety, but their only alternation to the 13-man squad was Malcolm for Ramprakash. Malcolm had been out of the side, after playing 17 consecutive Tests, since the Lord's Test a year before, and was selected after England team manager Micky Stewart spent two days watching him at Harrogate, where he failed to add to his season's tally of 12 first-class wickets. Stewart and Gooch were passed fit after minor worries, as was Botham who was troubled by a groin strain. England left out Munton, again, and Pringle, allowing Salisbury, England's first specialist leg-spinner for 21 years, to make his début a fortnight later than expected.

    Gooch won the toss, and with Stewart put on 123 for the first wicket at almost a run a minute as Pakistan failed to utilise the new ball, the overcast conditions and poor light. The England captain passed W. R. Hammond's Test aggregate of 7,249 runs when he reached 53, and looked in no trouble until he edged Wasim onto his stumps. But England lost their way from the moment Hick lobbed an ambitious pull to mid-on. Smith became Wasim's 150th Test victim and Stewart was removed in the last over before tea, after which Waqar cleaned up with a devastating spell of four for 17 in 40 deliveries. Waqar showed no signs of his recent back problem as he claimed his eighth five-wicket haul in his 16th Test, but England contributed to their own downfall. Several were guilty of loose shots and only Russell offered any sensible resistance at the end.

    Pakistan's first innings stretched beyond tea on Saturday, mainly because the second and third sessions on Friday were wiped out by rain. They faced only five overs from Botham, all on Saturday, after he aggravated his groin by slipping over on Thursday night. It did not prevent him catching Javed Miandad at first slip, to give Salisbury his first Test wicket, and following up with a brilliant diving catch to remove Moin Khan and equal M. C. Cowdrey's England record of 120 Test catches. But England's hero on Saturday was Malcolm. Pakistan were well set at 228 for three when he halted their charge by removing Asif Mujtaba, Inzamam-Ul-Haq and Salim Malik in 13 balls. England did well to restrict Pakistan to a lead of 38. They pulled in front in the 18 overs negotiated on Saturday night, though Gooch was a casualty. Night-watchman Salisbury proved a stubborn obstacle on Sunday morning for half an hour; but his fellow leg-spinner, Mushtaq Ahmed, instigated England's collapse, dismissing Hick, Smith and Lamb in 22 deliveries. Any hope of setting Pakistan a stiff target was destroyed by Wasim, who took the final three wickets in four deliveries. Stewart, alone, stood defiant. He became the sixth Englishman to carry his bat in a Test, and the first at Lord's. It was a responsible and mature innings, confirming his recent progress.

    The day's events had already been dramatic, but the climactic act was about to unfold. Pakistan needed 138 for victory, with nine hours remaining. They were soon 18 for three, as Lewis found the edge of the bats of Ramiz Raja, Asif Mujtaba and Miandad, all for ducks, in a high-quality spell. And when Salisbury had Malik caught with his fifth delivery, England had the sniff of victory. Gooch had two problems, however, Botham, still troubled by his groin, had been hit on the toe, and Defreitas had strained his groin, too; neither could bowl. But Salisbury refused to be overawed by the occasion and, with the help of a foolish run-out and another neat catch by Hick at second slip off Malcolm, Pakistan were reduced to 95 for eight. But the injuries told against England. Gooch had no one to administer the coup de grâce; Lewis, who had bowled his best spell in Test cricket, was running on empty. What England's captain needed was an over from Wasim or Waqar. But they were batting for the other side and, slowly but surely, they took Pakistan to victory. Rarely can a Test crowd have been through so many emotions in a single day's play.

    England's players were fined £330 each by referee Bob Cowper for their slow over-rate; it could have been £1,210, more than half their match fee, had he not allowed for interruptions and the long walk from the Lord's dressing-rooms to the pitch. During the match, Cornhill announced an extension to their sponsorship of English Test cricket, paying £3.2 million for the privilege in 1993 and 1994. But, like the lucky 26,000 spectators, Cornhill will never get better value for their money than they did on this Sunday at Lord's.

    Man of the Match: Wasim Akram.

    Attendance: 96,576; receipts £1,797,204.

    Close of play: First day, Pakistan 31-0 ( Aamir Sohail 10*, Ramiz Raja 20*); Second day, Pakistan 123-1 ( Aamir Sohail 73*, Asif Mujtaba 22*); Third day, England 52-1 ( A. J. Stewart 21*, I. D. K. Salisbury 1*).

    [​IMG]

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    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
  20. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    ICC World Twenty20, 1st Semi-Final: Pakistan v South Africa at Nottingham, Jun 18, 2009

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/wt202009/engine/current/match/356015.html

    Afridi on song as Pakistan enter final

    The South African juggernaut was brought to a screeching halt by Shahid Afridi who, with a little help from his team-mates, dumped the tournament favourites out of the World Twenty20 and secured Pakistan's place in the final. Afridi put in an all-round performance of tremendous intensity, lifting Pakistan to a defendable total with an aggressive yet methodical half-century, before bowling a spell that left the South Africans struggling at Trent Bridge.

    The clinical South African side, unbeaten in the competition, were favourites going in to the semi-final and their bowlers fought admirably to restrict Pakistan to 149 when, at one stage a total of 170 seemed on the cards. With the exception of Jacques Kallis, though, their batsmen failed to give the chase any sort of direction. They were suffocated by Afridi and the offspinner Saeed Ajmal and their inability to score enough runs during the middle overs left them with too much to do against the pinpoint accuracy of Umar Gul's yorkers.

    South Africa had reached 40 for 0 in the sixth over when Mohammad Aamer gave Pakistan an opening, holding a skier of Graeme Smith off his own bowling, minutes after the South African captain had been dropped by Gul.

    Afridi, high on confidence after his innings, came into the attack in the seventh over but was immediately driven by Herschelle Gibbs to the cover boundary. That was as bad as his evening would get. He bounced back, bowling Herschelle Gibbs with a straight and quick delivery and, an over later, he got AB de Villiers the same way. South Africa were 50 for 3 and struggling.

    Kallis and JP Duminy prevented the fall of any more wickets but they were unable to raise the run-rate. Afridi got the ball to turn, bounce and hurry on the batsmen and finished with 2 for 16 while Saeed Ajmal, the offspinner, was also difficult to score off because of his variations.

    The situation was perfect for Umar Gul to do what he does best, hit the blockhole. After an indifferent first over from the Radcliffe Road end, he ran in from the pavilion and fired in yorker after yorker. It didn't matter who was batting, those deliveries were impossible to hit. Duminy and Kallis could not get the ball off the square. It was Ajmal who struck the decisive blow when he had Kallis caught on the long-on boundary, realistically ending South Africa's chances. They needed 23 off the last over, a responsibility Younis Khan handed to the 17-year-old Aamer, who had bowled three overs for 15. He gave only 15 more, and sent Trent Bridge into raptures.

    The South African juggernaut was brought to a screeching halt by Shahid Afridi who, with a little help from his team-mates, dumped the tournament favourites out of the World Twenty20 and secured Pakistan's place in the final. Afridi put in an all-round performance of tremendous intensity, lifting Pakistan to a defendable total with an aggressive yet methodical half-century, before bowling a spell that left the South Africans struggling at Trent Bridge.

    The clinical South African side, unbeaten in the competition, were favourites going in to the semi-final and their bowlers fought admirably to restrict Pakistan to 149 when, at one stage a total of 170 seemed on the cards. With the exception of Jacques Kallis, though, their batsmen failed to give the chase any sort of direction. They were suffocated by Afridi and the offspinner Saeed Ajmal and their inability to score enough runs during the middle overs left them with too much to do against the pinpoint accuracy of Umar Gul's yorkers.

    South Africa had reached 40 for 0 in the sixth over when Mohammad Aamer gave Pakistan an opening, holding a skier of Graeme Smith off his own bowling, minutes after the South African captain had been dropped by Gul.

    Afridi, high on confidence after his innings, came into the attack in the seventh over but was immediately driven by Herschelle Gibbs to the cover boundary. That was as bad as his evening would get. He bounced back, bowling Herschelle Gibbs with a straight and quick delivery and, an over later, he got AB de Villiers the same way. South Africa were 50 for 3 and struggling.

    Kallis and JP Duminy prevented the fall of any more wickets but they were unable to raise the run-rate. Afridi got the ball to turn, bounce and hurry on the batsmen and finished with 2 for 16 while Saeed Ajmal, the offspinner, was also difficult to score off because of his variations.

    The situation was perfect for Umar Gul to do what he does best, hit the blockhole. After an indifferent first over from the Radcliffe Road end, he ran in from the pavilion and fired in yorker after yorker. It didn't matter who was batting, those deliveries were impossible to hit. Duminy and Kallis could not get the ball off the square. It was Ajmal who struck the decisive blow when he had Kallis caught on the long-on boundary, realistically ending South Africa's chances. They needed 23 off the last over, a responsibility Younis Khan handed to the 17-year-old Aamer, who had bowled three overs for 15. He gave only 15 more, and sent Trent Bridge into raptures.


    Prime Numbers
    • 50

      The number of dot balls played by South Africa in their innings. Pakistan played only 38 dots.
    • 233.33

      Shahid Afridi's strike rate against Johan Botha, whom he hit for 21 runs from 9 balls.
    • 1

      The number of fours conceded by Afridi in his four-over spell. Apart from that the only scoring strokes against him were 12 singles.
    • 238

      Jacques Kallis' aggregate in the tournament, at an average of 59.50 and a strike rate of 126.59.
    • 114

      Herschelle Gibbs' tally in the tournament. In six innings, only twice did he go past 20.


    Pakistan coach's Intikhab Alam had said on the eve of the game that his team would be looking to set a target of around 150. Pakistan got exactly that after an innings which followed a strangely symmetrical pattern. They dominated the first five overs, scoring 43, while South Africa fought back between overs five and ten to keep Pakistan to 68 for 2. Pakistan once again controlled the game between overs 11 and 15, reaching 120 for 3, but South Africa conceded only 29 off the last five overs.

    Pakistan's early dominance was due to Akmal, who was intent on smashing the ball from the start. He cut Dale Steyn twice for four in the first over and lofted him cleanly over long-off in the third. In between, he crashed Wayne Parnell to the midwicket boundary and raced to 23 off 11 balls before top-edging a pull off Steyn to mid-on.

    Pakistan had raced to 47 for 2 after six overs, with Afridi pulling Jacques Kallis twice through midwicket but South Africa then cut off the boundary supply. Afridi and Shoaib Malik didn't hit a boundary for 24 balls before Afridi slogged Roelof van der Merwe through midwicket. He cut loose against Johan Botha, making room to loft the offspinner thrice in a row to the cover boundary before unveiling a delectable late-cut to snatch 18 off the over. The 50-partnership had come up off 49 balls but Pakistan had begun to accelerate, with Afridi placing the ball into gaps consistently, plucking twos.

    South Africa desperately needed Afridi's wicket and it was duly picked up by JP Duminy, who struck with his first ball. Afridi tried to slog sweep and skied the ball straight to AB de Villiers at midwicket who took a vital catch with ease. South Africa celebrated the wicket with more relief than joy.

    Malik had played a more subdued, anchoring role until then, but began to step up, scoring his first boundary - a sweep off van der Merwe - off his 30th ball. He soon added another, hitting Duminy over extra cover, but eventually holed out to long-off. Younis and Abdul Razzaq were the two new batsmen at the crease and Parnell and Steyn bowled with extreme accuracy to deny them loose deliveries at the death.

    A target of 150 appeared less than what Pakistan were on course to get when Afridi was at the crease. But Afridi the bowler ensured that it would be enough.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wt202009/content/story/409673.html

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  21. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    NatWest Series, 8th Match: Australia v Pakistan at Nottingham, Jun 19, 2001

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/66280.html

    Waqar swings Pakistan to victory over Australia


    Pakistan gained a morale-boosting victory over Australia in the Day/Night International at Trent Bridge ahead of Saturday's NatWest Series Final.

    Having won the toss and elected to bat first Pakistan made 290-9 from their 50 overs and despite half-centuries from Adam Gilchrist and Steve Waugh Australia were restricted to 254 all out, losing by 36 runs. Once again Waqar Younis was the destroyer-in-chief, picking up 6-59.

    In pursuit of a huge victory target of 291 Australia needed to build a solid platform but they were rocked with the early departures of both Mark Waugh and Matthew Hayden. Waqar Younis, bowling the second over, began with a wide but then bowled a perfect away swinger which nicked the outside edge of Waugh's bat and was neatly taken by the diving Latif.

    Left-hander Hayden fell in the same over, although there was some confusion over his dismissal. Replays seemed to indicate that the ball struck only the pad on it's way through to the 'keeper. Although the lbw shout looked very close the official scorers maintained that the batsman was caught behind.

    Adam Gilchrist provided a dynamic response, smashing four boundaries in Waqar's second over but the Pakistan captain continued his purple streak at the start of his third. Michael Bevan being the next to go, bowled with a ball that nipped back into him and pole-axed his middle stump.

    An explosive seventh over produced 19 runs and Gilchrist's assault continued in the next over as successive pulled boundaries rocketed him to a very special 50 (44 mins 29 balls 11x4).

    At 76-3 after nine overs Saqlain's off-spin was introduced; Waqar's first spell, ending with figures of 3-43 from four overs! The first six of the innings (Saqlain/Gilchrist) came in the 12th over and brought the Australian 100 up from just 78 balls.

    With the score on 111 Saqlain grabbed the prize wicket of the opener as Gilchrist misread the flight and was bowled for 70 (70 mins 44 balls 1x6 12x4). In the same over Damien Martyn edged the wrong'un to Azhar Mahmood at slip and despite the healthy run-rate Australian victory chances appeared remote.

    Andrew Symonds joined Steve Waugh and provided reassuring support as his skipper advanced to yet another accomplished 50 (89 mins 63 balls 8x4). After 25 overs the pair had lifted the total to 165-5, still on target, and the partnership was soon extended past the 70 mark.

    With the floodlighting in full force 102 were needed from the final 19 overs when Waqar returned to the attack. The golden arm of the Pakistani captain struck immediately as his opposite number skied him to Saqlain at mid off. Steve Waugh had made 56 from 89 balls.

    Three balls later Symonds, who'd shared a stand of 77 with his captain, then tried to lift Waqar over deep midwicket but watched as substitute fielder Imran Nazir juggled four times with the ball before holding onto the catch. Waqar's remarkable figures after five overs now read 5-48.

    The Australian tail had been left with too much to do by their top order and although Brett Lee hit Waqar for a huge 6 into the Radcliffe Road Stand he lost his off stump the very next ball to give the paceman his sixth wicket.

    Shane Warne made 14 before hitting Azhar Mahmood to Wasim Akram at cover and despite some stoic hitting from Jason Gillespie and Damien Fleming, Australia had lost their chance of an unlikely win before Gillespie was bowled by Razzaq.

    Saleem Elahi had earlier top-scored for Pakistan with 79, made out of a total of 290-9. Worryingly though the innings had been disrupted due to crowd disturbances, which forced the players from the field for 19 minutes. The unsightly presence of a boundary heavily ringed with police and stewards allowed the game to finish without a premature pitch invasion, although firecrackers in stands have no place at English cricket grounds.

    Afterwards Waqar Younis looked forward to the final on Saturday. "One more game to go and hopefully we can do well in that," he said. "Winning before the final is always a good thing.

    "It was a great game, we played really well. Especially Saleem Elahi with the bat. It was a very good pitch, winning the toss was a good thing."

    Of his own, match-winning bowling he commented: "It's swinging for me and I hope it will swing for me in the final."

    Steve Waugh was unhappy with the Australian performance, however. "We weren't too flash in the field," he said. "We missed some early opportunities. We got what we deserved tonight and have got some work to do before the final. We were outplayed by Pakistan tonight."

    But he had warm words for Gilchrist, commenting: "Adam Gilchrist did well early on. But some careless shots and the game was all over."

    Waugh had harsh words for the spectators that caused him to leave his team off the field during the Pakistan innings, and invaded the pitch at the end of the match.

    "The stewards tried their best to contain things but you can't control idiots, can you?" he commented.

    "You saw the way they behaved after the game and people shouldn't be allowed to spend £15 to come to a cricket match and think they can do what they want."

    But he admitted that the situation at Trent Bridge had been better than at other grounds.

    "Today there was an improvement in the way things were dealt with but it was still not an ideal situation. They put up fences but I don't think I would have been too keen if I had been a steward stood behind them."

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/story/103387.html?object=66280

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  22. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Pakistan tour of Australia, 3rd ODI: Australia v Pakistan at Brisbane, Jun 19, 2002

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/64778.html

    Akhtar, Akram prove too hot to handle

    Whatever the future of off-season international matches in Australia - and no-one is yet sure what the long-term holds - their earliest protagonists have at least wasted little time in marking them with brilliant individual performances and the perpetual thrill of an unexpected outcome.

    Two years ago, Australia and South Africa perfectly split a winter series with one win apiece and a tie in their three games at Colonial Stadium in Melbourne. And, although Australia's second foray into off-season contests only occasionally looked like concluding in similar equilibrium, the hosts' status as pre-tournament favourites was again undone today by a hard-working and committed group of tourists.

    Ultimately, high-octane pace bowling from Shoaib Akhtar (5/25) and breathless lower order strokeplay from Wasim Akram (49*) were the keys behind Pakistan's decisive 91-run win at the 'Gabba. They thus became the latest in a range of high-quality contributions from players among the visitors' squad during the course of their 2-1 victory in Super Challenge II.

    Living up to pre-series hype that has only intermittently been made to look overblown, Akhtar was simply outstanding as his team defended a score of 7/256 during the series-decider's evening session. In the moments that he wasn't required to hurl himself into the path of balls in the outfield, and receive treatment for niggling pain in his right shoulder, his modus operandi was to spend a busy night wringing five wickets out of a bouncy pitch.

    It was the collection of the first four of those scalps - in the space of a thunderous 23-ball blitz - that effectively put this game on ice.

    The manner of each dismissal was different but all were significant: Ricky Ponting (10) bowled as he drove across the line of a blistering inswinger; Darren Lehmann (0) shuffling too far across his crease and losing his leg stump; Damien Martyn (14) failing to ground a cut and top-edging to third man; and Michael Bevan (10) magnetically drawn into following a leg cutter and edging to the wicketkeeper.

    He later returned to trap Jason Gillespie (0) with a yorker as a Shane Watson (44*)-led Australia fought in vain to bridge the gap between the teams.

    Akram (1/27) also played an important role in the evening session, kickstarting Australia's slide on a cool Brisbane night. An excellent new ball burst accounted for Matthew Hayden (5) and partially restrained the ever-dangerous Adam Gilchrist (20) in the lead-up to the latter batsman's run out from a direct hit by Yousuf Youhana at mid on.

    Albeit that Akram's input with the ball failed to match an earlier cameo at the batting crease that had prevented Pakistan's innings from haemmorhaging in a manner to rival Australia's later problems.

    The indefatigable Pakistan all-rounder used the occasion of a world-record equalling 334th one-day international appearance to help smear a jaw-dropping 79 runs from the closing eight overs of the innings. Few of Australia's bowlers were spared punishment - spearhead Glenn McGrath (0/48) even forced to watch in horror when 23 runs were belted from his final over - as Akram joined with Youhana (61*) to add 88 runs in a crucial unbroken stand for the eighth wicket.

    Akram's career hit a low ebb when allegations of his potential involvement in match-fixing surfaced in the late 1990s; thankfully, however, it is for the sublime rather than the ridiculous that he continues to be renowned. His ability to tame batsmen of all standards and on all manner of pitches remains a calling card; extravagant hitting in the lower order is also an enduring trademark.

    Two consecutive sixes over McGrath's head, and a welter of boundaries, flowed here as he batted with an air of confidence and a sense of destruction that was only previously spotted among his teammates in the latter stages of a 94-run stand between openers Imran Nazir (66) and Saeed Anwar (26).

    By the close of Pakistan's display, a cautious start and a mid-innings collapse had accordingly each become distant memories for a crowd numbered at 11,612.

    In frequently exceeding the 150 kilometre per hour mark during Pakistan's defence of its score, Akhtar's deliveries were then only matched in pace by the rapidity with which batsmen were replacing one another in the middle.

    With a similarly plucky Shane Warne (31), the strapping Watson ultimately stepped in to haul the home team back from potential humiliation at 6/83 with a half-century stand for the seventh wicket. It was a brave and determined rearguard response in the circumstances. Alas, for Australia, it was also not nearly enough.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/story/117923.html?object=64778

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  23. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Prudential World Cup, 22nd Match: New Zealand v Pakistan at Nottingham, Jun 20, 1983

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65085.html

    Pakistan batted first and scored 261/3

    Zaheer Abbas top scored with 103 Imran Khan scored 79 as they both put on 147

    New Zealand were then bowled out for 250 (Muddaser Nazar 3/43) as Pakistan won by 11 runs

    At Nottingham, June 20. Pakistan won by 11 runs. To qualify for the semi-final, Pakistan needed not only to beat New Zealand but to make enough runs in their 60 overs to give them a better scoring-rate throughout the tournament. They met this second requirement, achieving an overall scoring-rate of 4.01 against New Zealand's 3.94, through an unbroken fourth-wicket stand of 147 in 75 minutes between Zaheer and Imran, during which they made 47 off Hadlee's last five overs. New Zealand were soon in trouble against Sarfraz, Mudassar and Qadir and it was not until Coney led the last three wickets in a sterling attempt at making 85 off the final ten overs that Pakistan had any uneasy moments. Bracewell helped him to add 59 in five overs and 13 were needed off the last over, but Coney, attempting a second run, was run out off the first ball from Imran's throw.

    Man of the Match: Imran Khan.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/150429.html
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
  24. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Pakistan tour of Sri Lanka, 2nd Test: Sri Lanka v Pakistan at Galle, Jun 21-24, 2000

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/63886.html

    Pakistan thrash Sri Lanka

    Absolute beating handed to the Lankans in this game.

    Abdul Razzaq took a hat trick in the first innings as Sri Lanka were bowled out for 181.

    Pakistan then took charge of the game with 4 centurions

    Saeed Anwar 123, Inzamam Ul Haq 112, Younis Khan 116 and Wasim Akram then smashed 100 off 89 balls as Pakistan posted 600/8 declared

    Sri Lanka were then bowled out for 256 in the 2nd innings with Waqar Younis taking 4/40.

    Pakistan won by a massive innings and 163 runs

    Toss: Sri Lanka.

    Still shaken after the First Test, the Sri Lankans were not ready for a rampant Pakistan display in the Second. Their first innings was a disaster, picked open by vintage fast bowling from Waqar Younis and parcelled up by a hat-trick from young all-rounder Abdur Razzaq. Four Pakistani batsmen then made hundreds and the tourists were on course for an unbeatable 2-0 series lead. Again, they won with a day to spare.

    The battle was lost on the first day when Sri Lanka, after winning the toss, were shot out for 181. There was a distinct lack of application on the part of the batsmen, with too many going for their strokes early on. Apart from Jayawardene and Ranatunga, no one seemed to have the will to make a fight of it. These two forged a useful 116-run partnership for the fifth wicket after Waqar, with help from Wasim Akram, had reduced Sri Lanka to a groggy 47 for four. But just when Sri Lanka were on the recovery track at 163 for four, Ranatunga was run out for 51 in thefourth over after tea, looking for a second on an overthrow. This opened the floodgates; the next five wickets went for 18. Razzaq, at 20 years 202 days, became the youngest bowler to claim a Test hat-trick - the first in Sri Lanka - when he sent back Kaluwitharana, Herath and Pushpakumara off the last three balls of his 11th over. He was only the second Pakistani to achieve a hat-trick; Wasim Akram had taken two, also against Sri Lanka, in consecutive Tests in the 1998-99 Asia Championship. Jayawardene once again batted with great flair in scoring 72 off 127 balls, but the scorecard made sorry reading. Only three batsmen reached double figures.

    In stark contrast, four Pakistanis reached three figures. Saeed Anwar set the ball rolling with a quality innings of 123, his tenth Test century, which took 237 balls and included two sixes and 12 fours. But that was a quiet effort. Inzamam dismantled the Sri Lankan bowling with a ruthless attack that produced 18 fours in 112 from 163 balls. The four successive boundaries off Jayasuriya to raise his 11th Test hundred were breathtaking batsmanship. He and Anwar put on 105 for the fourth wicket.

    Next in line was Younis Khan, who had made a hundred on debut against Sri Lanka three and a half months earlier at Rawalpindi. Following a poor series in the Caribbean against West Indies' pace attack, Younis found the Sri Lankan medium-fast bowlers more to his liking. He added 106 for the sixth wicket with Razzaq, and 120 for the seventh - a Pakistani record against Sri Lanka - with Wasim before he was out for 116 from 281 balls. Wasim was severe on the tiring bowlers, smashing six sixes and eight fours to reach his third Test century off just 86 balls. It was only the sixth instance of four or more batsmen making hundreds in the same Test innings, and Pakistan's 600 for eight was their highest total against Sri Lanka. Trailing by 419, the Sri Lankan batsmen found the pressure and Pakistan's pace attack too much to cope with. Jayasuriya and de Silva again failed to provide a major innings, and it was left to Atapattu and Ranatunga to delay the inevitable. Atapattu batted four hours for 59, while Ranatunga's two-hour response was typically aggressive. He hit 13 fours and had faced 80 balls for his 65 when he was lbw to Wasim's in-swinging yorker. Waqar picked up four wickets with a mixture of out-swingers and in-dippers for match figures of seven for 79. Pakistan's only setback came when referee John Reid fined Arshad Khan 30 per cent of his match fee for persistent appealing. Asoka de Silva, the first Sri Lankan Test cricketer to umpire in a Test match, must have wished his debut had been less traumatic for his countrymen.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/153928.html

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    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
  25. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Asia Cup, 5th Match: Bangladesh v Pakistan at Dambulla, Jun 21, 2010

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/asia2010/engine/current/match/455235.html

    Afridi's century flattens Bangladesh

    A new-look Pakistan, led by a new-look Shahid Afridi, bowed out of the Asia Cup with little to boast about but with their reputations enhanced, while Bangladesh ended their campaign by reaffirming the gulf between them and the top-flight teams. Afridi unleashed the kind of fury he is famous for to launch Pakistan to their highest ODI score, and subsequently their first victory in 2010. Bangladesh, however, belied a complete lack of purpose in both innings, as the match meandered to the kind of denouement that has administrators concerned about the future of ODI cricket.

    Bangladesh's spirit was snuffed in the first half when they were caught out without a plan by the Afridi redux - as aggressive as the marauder of old, but inventive and measured as well. These are early days yet, but captaincy is bringing out the best in Afridi. He has retained the willingness to attack but, entrusted with the responsibility of shepherding a young team, has weeded out the risks. Without having to heave across the line, at least until he gets set, Afridi once again showed he has the range to score at enviable pace.

    Having collared Sri Lanka's attack in more trying conditions, Afridi barely broke a sweat today. With Umar Akmal already in the groove when he entered in the 29th over, Afridi worked the spinners around for a couple of overs. He flexed his muscles in the 32nd, lofting Suhrawadi Shuvo over long on for six and cashing in on the over-compensation by pulling for four. There were two strokes of luck soon after: an inside edge missed the stumps, and a skier was dropped by Mashrafe Mortaza. After that, however, Afridi unleashed and Pakistan accelerated at a ridiculous rate.


    Having collared Sri Lanka's attack in more trying conditions, Afridi barely broke a sweat today. With Umar Akmal already in the groove when he entered in the 29th over, Afridi worked the spinners around for a couple of overs. He flexed his muscles in the 32nd, lofting Suhrawadi Shuvo over long on for six and cashing in on the over-compensation by pulling for four. There were two strokes of luck soon after: an inside edge missed the stumps, and a skier was dropped by Mashrafe Mortaza. After that, however, Afridi unleashed and Pakistan accelerated at a ridiculous rate.



    Smart Stats
    • Shahid Afridi scored the sixth fastest ODI century in terms of balls faced. He has three of the top six
    • Afridi has now hit the most sixes in ODIs, going past Jayasuriya. He now has 272
    • Pakistan's 385 was their highest ODI total, going past the 371 against Sri Lanka in 1996-97
    • Pakistan scored 129 runs from overs 41 to 50, the eighth highest on the list of most runs in the last ten overs in ODIs since 2000
    • Shafiul Islam, who leaked 95 runs, is sixth on the list of bowlers with the worst economy-rates in a ten-over spell






    An extra-cover drive, a tickle and a whiplashed cut off Mortaza gave Bangladesh a trailer of what was to follow. After reaching his fifty in the 41st over, Afridi plundered 39 off 10 balls, with eight fours and a six, off Mahmudullah, Shakib Al Hasab and Shafiul Islam. The two batsmen had been tied on 41 at the end of the 39th over; five overs later, Umar had reached a steady fifty, while his captain was three short of a hundred. Umar departed in the 45th over, just before the batting Powerplay.

    In the 46th, Afridi helped Razzak to fine leg to reach 100, off 53 balls, and in the same over he cut for four more before finishing with a loft over long on for his 271st six - the most by any batsman in ODI history. He smashed another length offering from Shafiul for No. 272 and stole one more four before his one-handed pull landed in the hands of square leg. Abdul Razzaq hustled 21 off nine balls, leaving the hapless Shafiul nursing figures of 3 for 95. The last ball of the innings was smeared over long off for six - Bangladesh had bled 120 runs in the last nine overs, and Pakistan had reached their highest ODI total, eclipsing a 13 year-old record, that was set up by - take a guess.

    Before Afridi's assault, Pakistan's openers laid the foundation in more sober fashion. After spanking his second ball for a six over extra cover, Shahzaib Hasan served notice of both his strengths and intentions by repeatedly driving Mashrafe Mortaza on the up. Shahzaib rushed to his maiden ODI fifty before he fell trying to heave Abdur Razzak across the line in the 13th over, having dominated the opening stand of 81 in 12.3 overs.

    With Shahzaib scoring freely, Imran Farhat had the breathing space to play out the seamers before settling in against spin. Having brought up his seventh ODI fifty, he succumbed to his own cheekiness, missing a late cut off Shakib. Bangladesh's spinners rallied in the period of play following the 25-over mark, culminating in Asad Shafiq's stumping in the 29th over. That was the Bangladesh captain's 100th ODI wicket, and it gave his side an outside chance to seize the initiative, but his opposite number upset his plans.

    Bangladesh's batsmen, reeling from the carnage, focused on batting out fifty overs instead of taking a shot at the target. Their approach ensured there was no interest left in the second half of the contest. Imrul Kayes was the biggest culprit, dawdling around without any intent to score, while Tamim Iqbal showed characteristic spunk in taking on Mohammad Asif. He had driven, flicked and pulled him for fours before Asif struck with a slow and short off-cutter. With Tamim's dismissal, Bangladesh's hopes of making anything out of the game receded. In an inexplicable display that underlined the rift between Bangladesh and the rest, Kayes and Junaid Siddique settled in to accumulate. Despite cutting out all risks against a spirited but tired attack, neither of them could reach three-figures. Siddique eventually unfurled a few shots for the gallery, but no one was applauding.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/asia2010/content/story/464102.html


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  26. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    ICC World Twenty20, Final: Pakistan v Sri Lanka at Lord's, Jun 21, 2009

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/wt202009/engine/current/match/356017.html

    Pakistan win the World Twenty20

    Afridi fifty seals title for Pakistan


    It wasn't the edge-of-the-seat final that would have signed off the ICC World Twenty20 in style, but that won't matter to Pakistan who gave their nation a something to savour amid troubled times. From the moment Tillakaratne Dilshan, the tournament's top-scorer, fell in the opening over Pakistan had a grip on the match. Shahid Afridi, who emerged as their trump card, guided his team home in the 19th over with an unbeaten 54, and it was left to Younis Khan to raise the trophy in what he later announced would be his final Twenty20 international, in front of a sea of delirious Pakistan supporters.

    Pakistan won't be playing at home for the foreseeable future, but the following they have had at this event has reinforced the notion that England can be a surrogate home. The masses were cheering from early on as Abdul Razzaq - a great individual comeback-story among the team's resurgence - claimed three key wickets in his opening burst to leave Sri Lanka on 32 for 4. They never looked back despite the best efforts of Kumar Sangakkara.

    Occasionally the tension rose as the required rate climbed, but each time Afridi was on hand with one of his most mature innings. He hit consecutive balls from Muttiah Muralitharan for six and four in the 14th over, a calculated assault against a key bowler. The destination of the trophy was sealed when he swung a huge six over midwicket off Isuru Udana in the 18th over - the moment when Sangakkara gambled on one of his weaker bowling links - and followed that with another boundary off a high full toss.

    Shoaib Malik played his part with 24 off 22 balls in a match-winning stand of 76 after Kamran Akmal had given early impetus to the top-order. The batsmen knew they didn't have to take many risks and played Ajantha Mendis better than any other team as he went for his most expensive spell of the tournament.

    Pakistan's rise from rank outsiders to champions is an extraordinary display for a team that had to beat Netherlands by a significant margin to even stay in the event during the group stages. However, they have peaked at the right time and couldn't have produced a more complete performance for a final. They fell five runs short two years ago at Johannesburg, but this time there was no mistake.



    [​IMG]
    Prime Numbers
    • 22

      Number of dot balls Pakistan bowled in the first six overs.
    • 53 for 1

      Sri Lanka's average score in the Powerplay overs, before this match. Here, they were reduced to 34 for 4 after six.
    • 129

      The number of runs Shahid Afridi has scored in his last three innings, since moving up to No.3, at a strike rate of 148.27. This run also includes his first two half-centuries in Twenty20 internationals, in successive games.
    • 13

      The number of wickets for Umar Gul in the tournament, exactly as many as in the 2007 edition. In 2007 he averaged 11.92 at an economy rate of 5.60. Here his average was 12.15 at an economy rate of 6.44.
    • 64

      Kumar Sangakkara's score, his second half-century and his highest score in Twenty20 internationals.
    • 3 for 20

      Abdul Razzaq's bowling figures, his best in Twenty20 internationals, and his second three-wicket haul in six matches.
    [​IMG]


    Sri Lanka, who have been the model of consistency, were caught off guard by aggressive tactics. In a stirring atmosphere, Pakistan were on top of their game from the start as 17-year-old Mohammad Aamer belied his inexperience with a tone-setting opening over. In a clear plan he bowled short at Dilshan who was distinctly discomforted by the approach. Against the fifth ball Dilshan tried to take the initiative with a scoop over short fine-leg, but only managed to pick out the man on the edge of the circle. He had middled virtually all his attempts at the shot during the tournament and what a time for it to go wrong.

    With the tournament's leading run-scorer heading off Pakistan were buoyed and Sri Lanka shaken. Jehan Mubarak was promoted to No. 3, but he couldn't survive the second over when he came down the pitch and got a leading edge into the covers to give Razzaq his first.

    Sri Lanka briefly rallied as Sanath Jaysuriya suggested he could marshal a turnaround. Favouring the leg side he swung Razzaq for six with a forceful short-arm pull and collected four more next ball, but it was a short-lived response when an inside edge crashed into the stumps. Razzaq was flat on his face at the moment of dismissal after slipping in his follow-through but it was Sri Lanka who were feeling unsteady.

    Younis Khan went on the attack and his decision to post a wide slip paid rich dividends when Mahela Jayawardene steered the ball straight to Misbah-ul-Haq at ankle height. Razzaq was playing his cricket with a new lease of life after being giving another crack at international level. He wasn't part of the original squad, but Yasir Arafat's injury that prompted the switch now looked like a stroke of fortune.

    Four wickets inside the Powerplay meant Sri Lanka had little choice but to play it safe as Younis turned to his spinners. Sangakkara was calmness personified amid Sri Lanka's problems aware that the hopes of a decent total rested on his shoulders. He paced his innings expertly, reaching fifty off 44 balls despite the problems that surrounded him, but only found support when joined by Angelo Mathews.

    The final five overs brought 59 runs and if any attack could make a game out of 138 it was Sri Lanka's. However, early wickets were key and they didn't materialise as Akmal and Shahzaid Hasan played sensibly. The wizardry of Mendis and Muttiah Muralitharan and the accuracy of Lasith Malinga have provided wonderful entertainment over the last weeks, but on this occasion couldn't conjure the magic spell that was needed.

    As Afridi and Malik embraced mid-pitch after the winning moment the emotion showed what this victory means for Pakistan. They needed this success most and perhaps that drive was the deciding factor. The country faces a difficult few years of rebuilding, but this victory will have brought great joy and, hopefully, belief of a brighter future.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wt202009/content/story/410042.html

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  27. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Great moment in the history of Pakistan cricket

    Enjoyed this tournament.
     
  28. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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  29. Disco Lemonade
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    Disco Lemonade Design Artist

    Dec 17, 2009
    4,946
    Bhai I have to say this whoever does this, it makes a very good read to remember all these matches. Thanks for doing this for us.
     
  30. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Asia Cup, 2nd Match, Group B: Pakistan v Hong Kong at Karachi, Jun 24, 2008

    Match Scorecard - http://m.espncricinfo.com/asiacup/engine/current/match/335347.html

    All-round Tanvir shines in 155-run win

    might indicate an emphatic victory for Pakistan but it needed an Asia Cup-record 100-run eighth-wicket stand between Sohail Tanvir and Fawad Alam to set up the win. Both of them made their maiden ODI half-centuries to lift Pakistan to 288, a score which proved well beyond the reach of Hong Kong's inexperienced batsmen.

    After Pakistan chose to bat on a blisteringly hot day in Karachi, Nadeem Ahmed, the Hong Kong left-arm spinner, sliced through the Pakistan middle-order as what was expected to be a straightforward opening encounter for the hosts threatened to become a tricky one before Tanvir and Alam's rescue act.

    Pakistan were at a precarious 161 for 7 when Tanvir and Alam started working the singles, effectively employing the sweep shot. The left-arm spinners initially kept them in check and the partnership gained impetus only after the 44th over, when Pakistan had progressed to a more reassuring 219.

    Tanvir raced to his fifty as a confident reverse-sweep, a conventional sweep and a powerful off-drive all fetched him boundaries. He holed out to long-off in the 47th but Alam, who had been subdued during the partnership, remained unbeaten to ensure the runs kept flowing and that his side weren't bowled out.

    Hong Kong had earlier got off to a dream start as Pakistan lost their in-form opener Salman Butt in the first over for a duck. Afzaal Haider, the 36-year-old seamer, shaped the first two deliveries into the left-hander, before getting the next one to move away, inducing the outside edge. On a pitch a bit on the slower side, Haider extracted a hint of movement and troubled Shoaib Malik, who opened the innings, and Younis Khan early on.

    With Pakistan on a scratchy 33 for 1 after eight overs, some loose bowling in the next couple of overs let them off the hook. Thirty runs came off them as a flurry of boundaries from Malik gave the innings momentum. He fell soon after to an athletic catch by Hussain Butt at backward point but with Younis getting into his stride and Mohammad Yousuf continuing his splendid form, Pakistan were in command at 121 for 2 after 19.

    Left-arm spinner Najeeb Amar bowled it flat and full to restrict the runs at one end while Nadeem was more adventurous, varying his flight and length. He was rewarded with the wicket of Mohammad Yousuf - top-edging a sweep. Younis continued to attack, impudently slog-sweeping Nadeem for six and then paddling him for four. Despite the batsmen's attacking mindset, Nadeem flighted the next ball and Younis, who danced down the track, was beaten by the turn and easily stumped.

    There was more joy for Nadeem as Misbah-ul-Haq failed to read a straighter one to be lbw. Another flighted delivery foxed Shahid Afridi, who checked his shot to offer a low return catch, and Sarfraz Ahmed was run out soon after as Pakistan slid to 161 for 7. An upbeat Hong Kong had eight fielders in the ring at this stage but things went all downhill from there.

    Faced with an intimidating target, Hong Kong's batsmen were all at sea against Pakistan's formidable fast bowling unit as they were unable to force the pace. A barrage of bouncers, especially from Umar Gul, discomforted the openers but they hung around for a while. Tabarak Dar dodged a snorter from Gul off the penultimate ball of the seventh over but was forced to retire hurt when he was hit on the jaw off the final ball.

    That triggered a collapse, with four wickets falling in quick succession. Opener Skhawat Ali was the first to go, pulling Tanvir to substitute Mansoor Amjad at fine leg. Iftikhar Anjum then struck with his first delivery, bowling Irfan Ahmed before Tanvir got his second with a middle-stump yorker to send back Courtney Kruger.

    Anjum was soon rewarded again for his wicket-to-wicket line as Hussain Butt became the next batsman to be bowled, leaving Hong Kong at a hopeless 45 for 4. With the spinners backing up the good work of the fast bowlers, the run-rate quickly shot up above eight, and the match meandered towards a foregone conclusion.

    Pakistan may have had some anxious moments but will be pleased with the manner in which their lower-middle order pulled them out of a dicey situation ahead of a tough encounter against arch-rivals India, on Thursday.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/asiacup/content/story/355944.html?object=335347

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  31. Ahson8
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    Ahson8 Sultan of Swing

    Jun 9, 2012
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    On this day:

    Mushy makes his first appearance



    [​IMG]
    Mushtaq Ahmed took 185 Test wickets © Getty Images


    1970
    One of Pakistan's finest legspinners is born. When he was in his prime, with his right arm whipping over and the ball spitting both ways from the pitch, Mushtaq Ahmed was mischief personified. He had his moments in the Test arena - 185 of them. But Mushy's signature moment was the 1992 World Cup final. Wasim Akram took the headlines, but Mushy took the big wickets of Graham Gooch and Graeme Hick in a bewildering spell. Typically erratic, Mushtaq also took a couple of horrible pastings off Australia - 1 for 145 off 36 overs in Rawalpindi in 1994-95, and 3 for 194 off 38 in Brisbane five years later. A glorious season for Sussex in 2003, when he became the first bowler in five years to take 100 wickets in the English season, got him back into the Pakistan Test side briefly. However, as his international career faded away he remained a match-winner for Sussex and also joined the Indian Cricket League. He retired from first-class cricket towards the end of the 2008 season and took up the role of England's spin-bowling coach.
     
  32. Ahson8
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    Ahson8 Sultan of Swing

    Jun 9, 2012
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  33. Ahson8
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    Ahson8 Sultan of Swing

    Jun 9, 2012
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    30/06/12: Commencement of the second test between Pakistan & Sri Lanka which was eventually drawn, as Hafeez & Azhar scored 196 & 157 respectively.

    Junaid Khan picked up the MOTM award for his 5/73 in the first innings on a dead pitch.
     
  34. Ahson8
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    Ahson8 Sultan of Swing

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    01/07/1954: Commencement of a test match in which England beat Pakistan by an innings & 129 runs at Trent Bridge.
     
  35. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Pakistan tour of England, 3rd Test: England v Pakistan at Leeds, Jul 2-6, 1987

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/63463.html

    At Leeds, July 2, 3, 4, 6. Pakistan needed only five overs and one ball for victory on the fourth morning. For England, it was a dismal reminder of their defeat by India on the same ground a year earlier. Because it contained cracks and its bounce was irregular, the pitch was criticised, but more culpable were England's batsmen. Of their bowlers, only Foster used the conditions properly, moving the ball into and away from the bat and forcing the batsmen to play. He took the first six wickets to fall and finished with eight, a display of fast-medium bowling that matched Imran's. Dilley's away-swing rarely threatened, Capel's line and length did not pass muster, and Edmonds vacillated between attack and containment. England had omitted Emburey in favour of a fourth seamer, Capel, while Richards stood in for French, who had not recovered from chicken-pox. Pakistan were unchanged.

    England chose to bat first on a sunny morning of high cloud and little breeze. It seemed ideal for batting, and yet after 63 minutes they were 31 for five, undone in the main by pace and swing. Robinson, to the third ball, was not fully forward; Athey, in the seventh over, played late; Broad, in the eighth, was neither forward nor back; Gatting played no stroke; and Gower played on, trying to take his bat away from a ball that lifted and was leaving him. Imran's figures were 7-1-16-3; Wasim Akram's, when he gave way to Mudassar, were 10-4-20-2.

    Botham's watchful approach saw him through almost two hours before Mudassar, having already bruised Botham's instep so that he would not take the field when Pakistan batted, tempted him to drive at a gentle out-swinger. Richards played no stroke to an in-swinger from Wasim, and when the young left-armer tired, Mohsin Kamal wound up the innings with three wickets in nine balls. Capel, 47 not out at tea, had no sooner reached a début fifty with his sixth boundary than he drove a ball of full length and Mohsin took the return catch above his head. He had batted well for three hours thirteen minutes, proving the wisdom of a full forward defence.

    Pakistan had 27 overs to stumps and in that time England put down three catches off Foster's bowling. Mansoor, first ball and then in the 26th over, survived hard chances to Edmonds and Emburey in the slips, and Emburey also dropped Yousuf, second ball, a straightforward catch and a costly miss as the night-watchman batted throughout the Friday morning session.

    Until he drove a full toss to cover in the final over, needing 1 for his hundred, Salim Malik quietly imposed himself on the second day's play. His innings, a lesson in application and technique, occupied five and a half hours and his 99 came from 238 balls with eight fours. Adding 72 runs with Ijaz Ahmed, he had been taking the game away from England, and on the third morning Ijaz and Wasim Akram took it beyond reach. Ijaz captivated the Saturday crowd with his dashing strokes: four off the back foot behind point and then, with two dancing steps, a straight boundary off successive balls from Edmonds; a turn of the wrists brought a ninth four and his fifty. Wasim Akram's 43 from 41 balls was a swashbuckler's innings containing four sixes and two fours. Edmonds put an end to the second stage of England's misery by running in from fine leg to dismiss him with a lovely tumbling catch.

    But stage three began immediately, Broad and Robinson going in Imran's first and second overs. Athey and Gower then put on 35 in the 38 minutes to lunch, batting as if there were no tomorrow. Broad had been unlucky, adjudged caught behind off Imran's second ball, which brushed his left hand after he had removed it from the bat and was snatched up in front of him by the wicket-keeper. The TV replay, after several viewings, suggested Broad was luckless on two counts. Yousuf was less successful in the afternoon when, having dropped the ball and then retrieved it, he appealed to have Botham caught behind. The umpire was not impressed. Nor was Botham, who reacted angrily, and umpire Palmer had to be quick to separate them. Imran also acted smartly, dressing down Yousuf in no uncertain manner.

    While Qadir kept one end tight through 23 successive overs, the quick bowlers operated from the Football Stand end to exploit the uncertain bounce. Imran bowled immaculately, and with his fifth wicket, that of Richards, well taken at forward short leg, he became the eighth bowler to capture 300 Test wickets. On the fourth morning, he took his tally for the innings to seven and for the match to ten. Capel had again batted soundly for three hours, but England's fate had been sealed since Thursday morning's gambit. That Imran would have made the same opening move was little consolation to Gatting.

    Man of the Match: Imran Khan. Attendance: 44,500; receipts £303,057.

    Close of play: First day, Pakistan 76-2 (Mansoor Akhtar 24*, Salim Yousuf 4*); Second day, Pakistan 280-7 (Ijaz Ahmed 33*, Wasim Akram 0*); Third day, England 186-7 (D. J. Capel 26*, N. A. Foster 13*).

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/151986.html
     
  36. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Pakistan tour of England, 3rd Test: England v Pakistan at Manchester, Jul 2-7, 1992

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/63577.html

    Toss: Pakistan. Test debut: England - T.A.Munton.

    This Test had moments of pure pleasure - Aamir Sohail's batting, Wasim Akram's bowling, David Gower's record aggregate - yet it will be remembered best for the incident between Aqib Javed, umpire Roy Palmer and Pakistan captain Javed Miandad that soiled the end of the England innings on the evening of the fourth day. Palmer warned Aqib for intimidatory bowling against Malcolm, and the situation became inflamed when Palmer returned Aqib's sweater with more emphasis than usual, probably because it was caught in his belt. That set off an exchange orchestrated by Miandad, as a Pakistan supporter ran on waving a rolled-up newspaper and chased by two security men. It was all too reminiscent of the confrontation between Mike Gatting and Shakoor Rana at Faisalabad in 1987-88, except that Shakoor shouted back, while Palmer retained the dignity of a patient policeman watching a family squabble.

    Conrad Hunte, deputising for match referee Clyde Walcott who had left early for an ICC meeting in London, fined Aqib half his match fee, approximately £300. He also severely reprimanded team manager Intikhab Alam for telling the press, while Hunte was holding his inquiry, that Palmer had insulted his players by throwing the sweater at Aqib. Hunte urged Miandad and Gooch to tell their men to play according to the spirit of the game, which infuriated Gooch, who had not been involved. Intikhab was censured again - this time by ICC - when he repeated his remarks, and declined to apologise, after the match. The Pakistan players were also fined 40 per cent of their match fees for their slow over-rate.

    England had dropped Botham and Lamb, and Defreitas was declared unfit with a groin strain. Gower had been in such fine form with Hampshire that his much-criticised attitude, not to mention his unauthorised flight in Queensland 18 months earlier, was temporarily forgiven and he was recalled for his 115th Test, passing M. C. Cowdrey's England record. Atherton, batting fluently again after his back operation, also returned, and Warwickshire seamer Munton made his début at the third attempt. Pakistan were unchanged after their victory at Lord's, since when Ramiz Raja had made a trip home to have treatment for his back.

    Once Miandad won the toss there was no question about who would bat on a fast and springy pitch built for the stroke-makers and an outfield quick enough to ensure they received full value for their shots. Sohail and Ramiz, two opening batsmen who had clearly attended the Gordon Greenidge school of controlled aggression, set off in a blaze of boundaries and by lunch 131 runs were on the board for the loss of Ramiz, given out off an inside edge discernible only to umpire Palmer - the starting point, so it was said, of the ill-feeling that grew afterwards. While Asif Mujtaba put down an anchor, Sohail assaulted any ball of less than perfect length and direction, so that he reached his first Test hundred from 127 balls in under three hours in only his fourth innings. He was 131 by tea and, after reaching his maiden double-hundred, went for 205, playing a tired shot to a searching ball from Lewis, 20 minutes before time. He hit 32 fours in 284 balls, most memorably through the covers. Mujtaba managed his second fifty of the series in less than two hours before he essayed his only rash stroke. Miandad was quiet save for an over from Salisbury in which he hit five boundaries, just to remind spectators who was master batsman in Test cricket now Viv Richards had gone. Each of the first three wickets put on more than a hundred runs.

    The second day was washed out and after Miandad became Munton's first Test wicket on the third morning, within 12 runs of his 24th Test century, Pakistan looked unlikely to produce the really intimidating score that might yet have won the match. Gooch, who must have despaired of the quality produced by his senior bowlers, sent down 18 overs himself and claimed three wickets, as he recorded his best Test figures. When Pakistan declared in mid-afternoon on the third day, they were too short of time and runs to push hard for victory unless they instigated a rapid collapse. More bad light and rain hindered England's start, and Wasim's determination to make a showing on the ground where he had just signed to play four more years for Lancashire was illustrated both by his fire and by 32 no-balls in the innings. Most dramatically, in his eighth over he toppled both Stewart, playing at a wide ball, and Atherton, unable to deal with one swinging across him in the Bruce Reid manner. But Pakistan probably wrote off their chances of victory by dropping three catches before the close.

    Gooch and Smith saw England to Monday morning (to avoid a clash with the men's final at Wimbledon, this Test was the only one of the summer which had a rest day) and, when Smith was lbw to a ball from Aqib that cut in, the crowd rose expectantly for Gower, who needed only 34 runs to overtake G. Boycott's record England aggregate of 8,114 Test runs. What followed was Gower in spades: a squeeze through slips, a superb cover drive, a delightful push through mid-wicket, a head-high chance to first slip and finally, only 31 minutes after he arrived at the crease, a cover-drive to the boundary, a fitting shot to make him England's most prolific scorer in his 200th Test innings. Both Gooch, who had battled for his 78, and Gower, out to a flash outside the off stump, were gone with 106 needed to save the follow-on. But Lewis, with his own mix of heavyweight drive and deliberate care, and Salisbury, with commendable spirit, both hit half-centuries to ensure Pakistan could not win. Wasim finished with five wickets, for the tenth time in Tests, and Aqib with four for 100, his best Test figures, including a nicely judged slow yorker to bowl Malcolm in his first over after the contretemps with Palmer. For once both outshone Waqar Younis. Guided by Miandad, Pakistan batted with scrupulous caution, but without difficulty throughout a final day made interesting by more overs from Gooch, who bowled Malik for the second time as he returned a match analysis of five for 69. England were without Russell, who had a stomach complaint, and Stewart kept wicket, a sign of things to come.

    Man of the Match: Aamir Sohail.

    Attendance: 44,891; receipts £618,204.

    Close of play: First day, Pakistan 388-3 ( Javed Miandad 59*, Moin Khan 7*); Second day, No play; Third day, England 72-2 ( G. A. Gooch 39*, R. A. Smith 5*); Fourth day, England 390.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/152066.html

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  37. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Asia Cup, 10th Match, Super Four: Pakistan v India at Karachi, Jul 2, 2008

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/asiacup/engine/current/match/335355.html

    Younis special overpowers India

    Pakistan - courtesy Younis Khan's scintillating hundred - showed plenty of character to make easy work of a target of 309 against India and push their case for a berth in the final on Sunday. Pakistan's openers set the platform with attacking cricket against India's battle-weary seam attack, before masterful middle-order batting from Younis and Misbah-ul-Haq helped them gallop home with 27 balls to spare. The victory not only saved the home side from an early elimination, but also brought the lukewarm tournament to life as the hunt for Sri Lanka's opposition in the final extended to another day, at least.

    Pakistan's ruthless approach was similar to the defeat India inflicted on them last week. Mahendra Singh Dhoni's decision at the toss was a no-brainer as, on a typically benign pitch, Virender Sehwag began the run-glut with imperious hitting before Dhoni and Rohit Sharma crafted workmanlike half-centuries to arrest a sudden top-order jolt. India's bowlers however wilted in unforgiving conditions and Pakistan - backed by a boisterous crowd - never let the initiative slip once the openers set the launch pad.

    The intimidation began with Salman Butt's treatment of Praveen Kumar - he cut, drove and whipped anything either too short or wide and Nasir Jamshed found the bowler's gentle swing and pace to his liking as well, stepping down the track to crash one back down the ground. The early hitting started to tell on the fielders as well - Ishant Sharma fumbled to concede a boundary at deep square leg and Praveen failed to sight a skier towards third man. Irfan Pathan, playing his first game of the tournament, then came under the hammer as Jamshed slammed one over his head. Irfan responded with two head-high bouncers but was duly dispatched with controlled hooks.

    The only blip in the opening stand was the running. Shortly after a shy at the striker's end nearly claimed Jamshed, poor calling ended Butt's innings. Butt took off for a second run but found himself yards short of his ground.

    Jamshed marched on to his fifty - in his first match against a world-class opposition - before cramps cut short his innings at 53. Younis began in his typically breezy fashion, flashing an upper cut, extra-cover drive and a reverse-sweep off Piyush Chawla to bring up his fifty and 5000 ODI runs. And though Chawla bowled Mohammad Yousuf round his legs to leave Pakistan at 168 for 2 in the 26th over, they were still on course for a win.

    Younis was particularly harsh on the spinners, making good use of the sweep. Chawla and Sehwag came in for some rough treatment as Younis opened his stance and peppered the on side with several singles, twos and the odd boundary. Misbah's batting showed no signs of the pressures of captaincy as he complemented his partner's urgency by scoring at over a run a ball. Misbah slog-swept Sehwag for the first six of the match; Younis took on Chawla and carted him over the roof, hitting against the turn.



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    • During his 123, Younis Khan became the ninth Pakistan batsman to score 5000 ODI runs.
    • Mahendra Singh Dhoni's 76 is his highest scoreat No. 5. He hasn't done too well in the position, averaging 34.36 from 13 innings, much lower than his career average of 47.72.
    • Sohail Tanvir conceded 87 runs in the match, the most for a Pakistan bowler against India. Only Naved-ul-Hasan has given away more runs in an innings among Pakistan bowlers. Tanvir's economy-rate never exceeded 6.5 before this game.
    • India managed only 51 runs between overs 41 to 48. Debutant Saeed Ajmal gave away 21 in the four he bowled in that period, and picked up one wicket.
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    Dhoni brought the seamers back once the ball got older but there was hardly any reverse-swing to work with. Misbah had the audacity to walk across the stumps and fetch a boundary off Irfan with a delicate flick of the wrists, something Sehwag did with equal efficiency earlier. Younis punished anything short and wide outside the off stump as he brought up his fifth ODI century - also his third against India. Misbah continued his on-side bashing with swivelled pulls and aptly finished the game with a flick past wide mid-on.

    The story could have been different had Sehwag carried on. He looked set to tear Pakistan apart for the second time in as many matches with a breathtaking assault, upsetting the bowlers with his improvisation. Misbah bravely persisted with the Powerplays after India had blazed 86 in ten, and Pakistan turned the tide thanks to a double-strike by Abdur Rauf which pegged back at India 91 for 3. Yuvraj Singh's brief stint at the crease was punctuated by elegant drives, before Iftikhar Anjum ended his cameo. At 129 for 4, the home side felt a surge of optimism and the crowd played along as well.

    However, Dhoni and Rohit ensured the run-rate never dipped below five an over throughout their 112-run stand. Both batsmen took their time to settle in, but neither played second fiddle. Rohit, who has been struggling for form since the IPL, grafted it out at the start, but displayed sound application and urgency to score at a faster rate than his captain. As the partnership mounted, so did the anxiety for Pakistan as the prospect of a challenging chase loomed. Both brought up their half-centuries off successive balls, in the process completing their century stand, which included 68 singles. The pair set up a seemingly defendable total, but ultimately India found themselves at least 30 runs short.

    A loss against Sri Lanka on Thursday will mean India will have to wait on the result of the Pakistan-Bangladesh match on Friday to know whether they progress to the final.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/asiacup/content/story/359313.html

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  38. Mohsin
    Online

    Mohsin Cornered Tiger

    Feb 21, 2010
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  39. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Pakistan tour of Sri Lanka, 3rd Test: Sri Lanka v Pakistan at Pallekele, Jul 3-7, 2015

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/860267.html

    1st day July 3, 2015
    Sri Lanka crumble to legspin again

    Sri Lanka succumbed to legspin yet again in the series, losing six wickets to the variety, and four of them to their tormentor Yasir Shah to crumble from a strong 106 for 1.Dimuth Karunaratne saw out the new ball on an unevenly grassy pitch in the morning, and dug in to make his second Test century, but fell to part-timer Azhar Ali just before the second one came. Rahat Ali, who had made the initial breakthrough as well, capped off a superb fightback from Pakistan by claiming Dinesh Chandimal leg-before on review in the penultimate over of the day.

    Karunaratne and Upul Tharanga - playing his first Test in a year in place of the absent Kumar Sangakkara - had batted positively after the early loss of Kaushal Silva. As the zip began to ebb from the pitch, Sri Lanka were comfortably placed on 85 for 1 in 26 overs at lunch.

    That comfort fell apart after the break. Pakistan tightened up considerably, the seamer Imran Khan bowling accurate lines and Yasir varying his lengths and angles. There was little in the day one pitch for Yasir, but the Sri Lanka middle order was tied down by his combination of flight, accuracy and control. The runs dried up, only 21 coming in the first nine overs after lunch.

    Tharanga, on 46, attempted to counter with an expansive drive without moving his feet, and the ball popped up off the keeper to be taken by a diving slip. Lahiru Thirimanne and Angelo Mathews tried hitting out, and only went as far as mid-off and mid-on, to depart in successive Yasir overs. Sri Lanka went to tea 3 for 68 off 27 overs in the second session.

    Karunaratne and Jehan Mubarak, playing his first Test since 2007, managed somewhat of a recovery around the tea interval. Yasir understandably flagged during a 22-over spell on the trot. The pitch eased up further. Karunaratne calmly kept collecting runs, using his feet to spin and punching the seamers through the off side.

    Yasir was reintroduced as soon as Karunaratne reached his century, off 188 balls, and Mubarak, who had been timing the ball alright, suddenly jumped out and was stumped.

    The trend was to continue against Azhar too. Even as the second new ball approached and another stand developed between Karunaratne and Dinesh Chandimal, it was the former's turn to charge and be found short of his ground on 130.

    Sri Lanka had undid all the good work they had started in the first session. Pakistan's new-ball pair of Rahat and Ehsan Adil did not make the batsmen play enough at the start, and Rahat was on the shorter side often, especially to the left-handers. When Pakistan did pitch it up on tighter lines, they caused discomfort with zip and movement, and drew edges, none of which carried to their misfortune.

    The way Tharanga bats, he was bound to be beaten pushing half-forward outside the off stump. The way Tharanga bats, he was also going to get runs as long as he was in the middle. A couple of boundaries off his preferred back foot forced Rahat out of the attack.

    Karunaratne was more cautious early in his innings, choosing to play out deliveries from the crease. When he edged, he did so with soft hands. When he drove, he went straight and firm down the ground.

    There was a review against him for leg-before off Imran when he was on 12, but the third umpire upheld the on-field not-out call without checking the ball tracker, suggesting he had detected an inside edge.

    When Yasir was brought on in the 17th over, Karunaratne stepped out first ball to clip it to the deep midwicket boundary, and continued to do that against spin through his innings.

    With the pitch easing out towards lunch, Pakistan tried the bouncer, but Tharanga and Karunaratne were not bothered. It was Yasir, helped by another legspinner, who were to cause all the trouble again.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/sri-lanka-v-pakistan-2015/content/story/893585.html

    2nd day July 4, 2015
    Sarfraz fights as Pakistan crumble against seamers

    The discipline of Sri Lanka's seamers bore down heavily upon Pakistan, and Sarfraz Ahmed was left conjuring another revival act after another collective batting failure. Rain interrupted play frequently, and 20 overs were lost despite play being extended till light faded, with Pakistan trailing by 69 runs, and last man Imran Khan standing with Sarfraz.

    Sri Lanka's tail lasted only 3.5 overs into the morning, after which their seamers hit back with the wickets of the Pakistan openers, and the visitors slipped further with Younis Khan's run-out at the stroke of lunch. From 45 for 3, Azhar Ali uncharacteristically countered with several boundaries to make 52, but Dhammika Prasad and Nuwan Pradeep never allowed a partnership to develop, three of them getting terminated in the 40s.

    The zip and movement available to Pakistan's fast bowlers on day one was not quite there for Sri Lanka, but they made up for it with their perseverance. Prasad caused problems with his usual energetic effort combined with accuracy. Although he and Suranga Lakmal were taken for a few runs when they pitched it up, they also kept testing the batsmen, as did Nuwan Pradeep's greater control and shorter lengths.

    It was the bustling Prasad who produced the breakthrough, hitting Shan Masood full on the boot in the ninth over, and appealing loud and long enough to convince umpire Ian Gould. Replays showed umpire's call for both point of impact on the boot and on the stumps.

    With Lakmal hit for a few boundaries by Ahmed Shehzad, Pradeep was brought on and struck with his third delivery, his tight line confusing Shehzad, who edged behind in trying to leave one too late.

    Angelo Mathews then came on himself and squeezed the runs further, with only four coming in six overs after Shehzad's fall. Younis was looking comfortable with his defence, but the lack of runs made him push for a tight single in the last over of the session, and Kaushal Silva found his mark from short midwicket.

    Runs came much quicker after the interval. Sri Lanka tried bowling full searching for swing. It wasn't alarming movement, and Azhar picked up fours regularly through the off side. Mathews positioned deep point soon, but Azhar was able to place it wide of the fielder on occasion.

    The hosts then tried banging it short from round the stumps, especially to Asad Shafiq, but the pair survived till a 20-minute rain delay. Facing his first ball upon resumption from Prasad, Shafiq was caught on the crease to a length ball that came in.

    Azhar kept counter-attacking and Sarfraz was anyway going to play his shots, a top-edged hook falling safely behind square off Prasad, before another shower arrived and forced tea to be taken.

    Pradeep, who had bowled superbly without enough reward, got two in quick succession after tea. Azhar had prospered on the drive, and he fell by it, nicking Pradeep to second slip.

    It was a proper crisis by now at 135 for 5 and in walked Misbah-ul-Haq, batting down the order due to a groin strain. He lasted 17 balls, Pradeep suddenly going wide of the crease and angling one full to strike the pad.

    Yet again, it was Sarfraz who stepped up. He had been loose when he came in, but applied himself after tea. Of course, his style of batting meant the score kept moving. Calculated drives were hit through the off side, singles and twos were picked square both sides of the wicket. His confidence rubbed off on Yasir Shah, who hit some meaty strokes in an eighth-wicket stand of 45.

    There was not much of a role for the offspinner Tharindu Kaushal till later in the innings, when he nailed a couple of tailenders lbw.

    In the morning, Yasir Shah took his wicket-tally for the series to 22, and became only the second visiting bowler after Shane Warne to take three five-fors in a Test series in Sri Lanka, when he ended the hosts' innings by trapping Pradeep lbw.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/sri-lanka-v-pakistan-2015/content/story/893921.html

    3rd day July 5, 2015
    Mathews builds commanding position for Sri Lanka

    Angelo Mathews was the rock in Sri Lanka's middle order once again, soaking up all the pressure Pakistan created, and rebuilding from 35 for 3 to take the hosts to a commanding position. Upul Tharanga, Jehan Mubarak and Dinesh Chandimal supported their captain as Sri Lanka gradually stretched their lead to 291 until bad light ended play on another rain-hit day.

    It was typical Mathews resistance, blocking and blocking most of whatever Pakistan hurled at him, working the ball into gaps for singles and twos, and exploding into the odd emphatic boundary against the run of play. The few times he was beaten during his 177-ball stay, he shrugged and concentrated harder.

    The pitch slowed down as the day progressed, although the legspinner Yasir Shah started turning and bouncing it from the line of off. Although Yasir gave it everything in a 25-over spell of 2 for 70, Sri Lanka dearly needed this effort from their captain to recover from the jolts Rahat Ali and co had delivered.

    Sri Lanka had taken two overs to dismiss last man Imran Khan in the morning, making absolutely no attempt to target Sarfraz Ahmed, who was left stranded on 78. But Rahat led a stirring fightback from Pakistan after they had conceded a 63-run first-innings lead.

    Ehsan Adil played his part but Rahat was the standout bowler for Pakistan, bowling with sustained pace and control, varying his lengths and extracting bounce and movement off the pitch and in the air.

    Consistently taking it away from the left-handers, Rahat straightened two rippers past the defenses of Dimuth Karunaratne and Lahiru Thirimanne, the latter's 11-ball duck ending with a swinging yorker.

    Using the short ball sparingly, Rahat created doubts in the minds of the batsmen, and both Karunaratne and Thirimanne were caught half-forward after being beaten numerous times. Thirimanne was also hit on the base of the arm guard as he ducked into a lifter, and had to take treatment on the field.

    Adil created similar issues for the right-handed Silva, hitting a tight line and length outside off and moving it away. Silva is a difficult batsman to bowl to, his tendency to play with soft hands ensuring most edges don't carry to the cordon. But the kind of effort Pakistan were putting, and the zip they were generating, even Silva could not avoid nicking one for Misbah-ul-Haq to take a sharp, low catch at first slip.

    Rain reprieved Sri Lanka immediately after the third wicket fell, and Tharanga and Mathews batted positively upon resumption in the few overs until lunch.

    Mathews survived a review for leg-before off Rahat at the stroke of lunch, but Pakistan did not review when Imran hit Tharanga's pad first ball after the interval. They were probably confused by the two sounds, but one of them was that of Tharanga's bat crashing into his pad. Tharanga was on 29 then, and went on to hit a few more boundaries in a 47-ball 48 before popping one off the inside edge to short leg off Yasir.

    Rahat, in such fine rhythm in the first session, was introduced in the second only after Tharanga fell. His second and third spells lacked the threat of the first, and it was Adil who created problems for Mubarak with a hint of reverse, beating the left-hander often outside off.

    Mubarak was solid after another shower forced tea to be taken early, and played some superbly-timed drives through extra cover. Mubarak and Mathews doubled the score from 80 for 4 till the former fell in the short-leg trap to Yasir for 35.

    Chandimal's arrival quickened the pace of scoring, and he comfortably worked the ball off the back foot as Pakistan started to flag. He progressed to 39 smoothly, and with Mathews inching to 77, Sri Lanka's lead was in touching distance of 300. Only twice has a target more than that been achieved in a Test in Sri Lanka, and a visiting side has never done it.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/sri-lanka-v-pakistan-2015/content/story/894205.html

    4th day July 6, 2015
    Younis, Masood tons put Pakistan ahead

    Shan Masood and Younis Khan came together at 13 for 2 in a chase of 377, and responded with the highest fourth-innings partnership ever for Pakistan, leaving the visitors 147 runs adrift of achieving the highest successful chase ever in Sri Lanka.

    The duo had to contend with a charged up three-man pace attack running in with a new ball. Masood had to overcome considerable nerves in general in his first Test outside the UAE, and discomfort against the short ball in particular. Their ally was the pitch, having slowed down enough for the ball to lose nearly all its threat along with its shine. Their pressure release was the inexperienced offspinner Tharindu Kaushal, who went for 92 in 20 wicketless overs.

    The first ball of Pakistan's innings had summed up the task that lay ahead, when Dhammika Prasad squared up Masood with a ripper. Suranga Lakmal bettered that testing first over, beating Ahmed Shehzad with one that moved away and then uprooting his off stump with one that came in. Misfortune added to Pakistan's worries when Azhar Ali nicked behind down the leg side off Prasad in trying to whip a wide one.

    The scoreline of 13 for 2 would not have helped Masood's jittery beginning, but the arrival of Younis did. Younis was eager to move across and solidly got behind the line of deliveries. He was also keen to look for the single. Slowly, Masood started to find some confidence. He was still not comfortable against the shorter lengths but moved forward to drill a few drives down the ground when the seamers overpitched.

    The introduction of Kaushal in the 14th over changed the situation. The offspinner could not control his lengths, and repeatedly served up short balls and full tosses. Masood stepped out to lift him for fours, Younis pulled powerfully. By tea, Kaushal had conceded 43 from seven overs and the partnership had grown to 86 in 22.

    Younis had been in no trouble till tea; he became almost imperious after the break. He started jumping across and thumping the fast bowlers on the up through the covers. He whipped Prasad through midwicket and cover-drove him for successive fours to march past fifty.

    Masood had settled down, and though he was still getting beaten on the cut, he was also working the ball into gaps.

    With his fast bowlers flagging, and his offspinner leaking runs, Angelo Mathews tried himself, and almost broke through. Sri Lanka reviewed for leg-before against Masood, on 79, but with replays inconclusive about whether there was an inside edge, the third umpire had to go with the on-field call.

    Sri Lanka's spread-out fields helped Masood and Younis to keep rotating the strike. Masood reached his maiden Test hundred stepping out and lifting Kaushal for a straight six. Younis never allowed the offspinner to settle, trying the reverse sweep now and then, and made it 30 Test centuries with a swept four in the last over of the day. He also became the first man to make five fourth-innings hundreds.

    In the morning, Mathews' fifth Test century had stretched Sri Lanka's lead to 376, even as Imran Khan picked up his maiden five-for with the second new ball.The overnight pair of Mathews and Dinesh Chandimal had furthered their rebuilding act to strengthen Sri Lanka's position, adding 50 runs more to extend their sixth-wicket partnership to 117.

    The lead was nearing 350 when Imran finally got reward for his accuracy in the 16th over of the day, Chandimal going leg-before for 67. Prasad bagged a king pair, feathering one to the keeper.

    Imran, who had bowled lucklessly in the first innings, wrapped up proceedings to herald lunch, when Mathews chased a wide one on 122, and became the fourth successive man to be caught by Sarfraz Ahmed. By then, he had left Pakistan the task of mounting the second-highest successful chase in Asia to win the series. Masood and Younis' 217-run partnership seems to have put Pakistan firmly on that path.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/sri-lanka-v-pakistan-2015/content/story/894515.html

    5th day July 7, 2015
    Younis 171* gives Pakistan series in record chase

    Younis Khan's epic, unbeaten 171 led Pakistan to their highest successful chase, the second highest in Asia for any side, and the sixth highest in all Test cricket. It also gave them their first series win in Sri Lanka since 2006, and catapulted them to third in the ICC Test rankings.

    The feat required the highest fourth-innings partnership for Pakistan, 242 between Younis and Shan Masood, who fell on the fifth morning for 125. Misbah-ul-Haq arrived with 122 needed, saw off Sri Lanka's quicks till lunch, and opened up after that to reel off an unbeaten 59, finishing the match with a six.

    Sri Lanka's fast bowlers put in a spirited effort, especially with the second new ball, but could not break down Younis and Misbah.

    Pakistan needed 147 more at the start of the day, and Masood and Younis' record partnership grew by 25 before the former fell to his nerves. Masood had been tied down by Sri Lanka's accuracy, and was itching to break free. No release was provided by Angelo Mathews and the specialist seamers. When the offspinner Tharindu Kaushal was introduced in the 11th over of the morning, Masood, eyeing some runs, jumped out, but was beaten by the turn to be stumped.

    Sri Lanka's specialist spinner had begun promisingly after a wayward return of 0 for 92 in 20 overs on day four, but again, he failed to sustain the pressure. He did shift his line wider outside off and spun it in sharply with men waiting in the leg trap, but was too inconsistent with his lengths. Misbah and Younis used the sweep frequently, and put away the regular full tosses with ease.

    It was a different story against the quicks. The first boundary of the day came only in the tenth over, when Younis forced an edge through the vacant slip region off Nuwan Pradeep.

    There was little in the pitch by way of variable bounce to suggest it was a day-five subcontinent wicket. Despite their discipline at the start, Sri Lanka were dependent on the new ball. Pakistan needed 101 more when it was taken, and they had the personnel in the middle to get them through.

    Misbah was happy to deny himself against the new ball, going 22 balls without a run. Batting on a big hundred, Younis was eager to move across and play as much as he could. There was an unsuccessful review for leg-before against Younis, on 128, by Dhammika Prasad, replays returning umpire's call for points of impact on pad and stumps.

    As Mathews tried Kaushal again at the stroke of lunch, Misbah stepped out to lift him over mid-on. Sri Lanka's challenge fell apart after lunch, Misbah and Younis raining boundaries on the hapless Kaushal, who had played ahead of veteran Rangana Herath, and was to end with figures of 1 for 153 in 31 overs.

    The winning runs came again from Misbah's bat, as they had come during their Sharjah chase of 302 against Sri Lanka in 2014. Younis ended with the fifth-highest score in a chase.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/sri-lanka-v-pakistan-2015/content/story/894815.html

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  40. chandtara
    Offline

    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,448
    Asia Cup, 12th Match, Super Four: Pakistan v Bangladesh at Karachi, Jul 4, 2008

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/asiacup/engine/current/match/335357.html

    Pakistan thrash sorry Bangladesh

    A clinical performance from Pakistan saw them coast to a ten-wicket win over Bangladesh in the inconsequential final Super Four match of the Asia Cup. In a refreshing change at the National Stadium in Karachi, the bowlers dominated the proceedings in the first session but for Bangladesh it was the same old story as their innings folded at 115 all out - the tournament's lowest total.

    On a pitch offering sideways movement and extra bounce, Abdur Rauf sliced through the top order with three wickets and Iftikhar Anjum bowled an astonishing six maidens - equalling the record for a Pakistani - to put the hosts on course. Half-centuries from openers Nasir Jamshed and Salman Butt helped complete the formalities with more than 30 overs to spare.

    The plethora of big scores that have been easily chased down hasn't dissuaded captains from choosing to bat first, and Mohammad Ashraful continued the trend. While Sohail Tanvir extracted significant lateral movement from the pitch initially, it was Rauf who got the early wickets.

    On one of the cooler days of the tournament, on a difficult pitch, Bangladesh's batsmen compounded their troubles with some ill-advised shots. Opener Nazimuddin attempted to pull a short delivery in the second over from outside off and only managed to top-edge it to Shoaib Malik at cover.

    Ashraful and Tamim Iqbal didn't bring out their strokes except when the bowlers erred, but their steady approach lifted Bangladesh to 41 for 2. Ashraful hadn't connected with an attempted hook in the ninth over but got hold of a short one from Rauf in the next to launch it over the midwicket boundary. Rauf's next ball was a fast bowler's classic reply: a snorter aimed at the body which forced Ashraful to give Misbah-ul-Haq a catch at point.

    Raqibul Hasan has shown a heartening and - for a Bangladesh batsman - rare ability to stick it out in the middle but this time he went for an ambitious hook first ball off Tanvir to hole out at short fine leg.

    With Bangladesh at a dicey 49 for 3, Rauf came up with the best over of the match. The first ball was a sharp bouncer which Tamim fended to slip, and Alok Kapali barely survived the next five torrid deliveries - a couple of well-directed bouncers, and a mixture of incoming and away-going deliveries.

    Iftikhar Anjum followed the Rauf formula of throwing in a surprise bouncer while also testing the batsmen against the deliveries which seamed off a length. Kapali struck three boundaries in Anjum's first over but he was undone by the extra lift in the pitch as well. It was a superb comeback by Anjum, conceding only seven runs in his last nine overs and beating the bat on umpteen occasions. He finished with figures of 10-6-20-2 and was unlucky to not get more wickets.

    Saeed Ajmal backed up the good work of the fast bowlers, picking up two late-order wickets off his doosra, which the batsmen struggled to pick as Bangladesh folded in the 39th over.

    The flimsy total wasn't going to be much of a challenge for a Pakistan batting line-up that convincingly chased down 309 against India on Wednesday. Jamshed provided the early momentum, repeatedly carting the bowlers in the arc between long-on and midwicket as Pakistan went into the dinner break at 23 for no loss.

    Shahadat Hossain extracted the same bounce which aided the Pakistan bowlers, and troubled both openers in the first over after the resumption but there were few alarms after that. Pakistan scored a boundary in virtually every over with a series of off drives off Mashrafe Mortaza and Shahadat.

    There was a brief lull after spin was introduced at both ends before Butt carved Abdur Razzak through extra cover in the eighteenth over. That opened the floodgates as Jamshed pummelled Mahmudullah over long-on for six and brought up his fifty with a swept four to midwicket. Butt also completed his fifty with three sweeps to the boundary off Razzak before an authoritative cut put Bangladesh out of their misery.

    Bangladesh are still without a win against challenging opposition since last year's World Cup and the poor showing at the Asia Cup isn't the sort of preparation they'd want ahead of a tough tour of Australia.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/asiacup/content/story/359648.html

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