On This Day - Classic Pakistani Matches, Blast From The Past

Discussion in 'Cricket Talk' started by chandtara, Apr 17, 2016.

  1. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    1st T20I: Australia v Pakistan at Birmingham, Jul 5, 2010

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/pakistan-v-australia-2010/engine/current/match/426392.html

    Umar blitz sets up Pakistan victory

    It can't bring back the World Twenty20 trophy, but Pakistan extracted some sort of revenge on Australia in their first meeting since the semi-final in St Lucia. Again, a vigorous Umar Akmal half-century set up Pakistan's innings but this time their bowlers, led by Mohammad Aamer, did enough to strangle Australia's run-rate and deny Michael Clarke's men, who couldn't chase down 168.

    In May, it took something special from Michael Hussey to drive Australia into the decider against England, as he monstered the 18 needed off the last over, bowled by Saeed Ajmal. This time, Ajmal fittingly collected the final wicket and was mobbed by his team-mates as Australia fell to a 23-run defeat, their first loss to Pakistan in any format in their past 13 meetings.

    Umar set up the victory with the fastest Twenty20 international half-century by a Pakistan player, a 21-ball effort that brought the thousands of Pakistan fans at Edgbaston to their feet. Their 167 for 8 looked competitive but gettable, and when David Warner scythed five boundaries from Shoaib Akhtar's first five balls, Australia appeared to be in charge.

    But once the field went back, and Shahid Afridi and Umar Gul came on, the runs dried up. Gul delivered yorker after yorker, and Afridi altered his pace and angle to keep Warner and David Hussey guessing during their 52-run stand. Hussey had 34 from 28 balls when he skied Afridi to mid-on, and Warner followed in the next over.

    Warner's 41 from 31 was more restrained than his usual Twenty20 efforts, with the attack on Akhtar his only period of dominance. Ajmal, the unlucky man asked to bowl the final over in St Lucia, deceived Warner with a ball that went straight on, beat the bat and crashed into the stumps. That brought Michael Hussey to the crease, but there were no heroics this time.

    The Australians needed some top-order support for Warner; instead, Michael Clarke's dismal Twenty20 batting record continued. He was caught for 5, trying to force Abdul Razzaq through cover and it is now eight innings since he has scored better than a run a ball in a Twenty20 for his country.

    Aamer (3 for 27) began the strong bowling effort by trapping Shane Watson lbw in the first over of the chase, before he returned to snare the key wickets of Cameron White and Steven Smith. With every wicket the Pakistan fans roared and blasted on their air horns, just as they had during Umar's batting blitz.

    The highlight of his 64 was a pair of sixes straight down the ground off Smith, but his ability to the find the gaps and invent ways of scoring was remarkable. It takes a brave man to paddle sweep a Dirk Nannes full toss off middle stump, but Umar made it look like the most logical selection of stroke and ran the ball to the fine-leg boundary.

    He departed in the 19th over, bowled by Shaun Tait, but by then he'd done enough. Umar was the star, but he had good support from Shoaib Malik in a 51-run stand that included 20 off one over, as Malik launched a stinging attack on David Hussey's offspin.

    Malik was out in unusual fashion when he edged a slow bouncer behind off Nannes and the batsmen took a cheeky single, only for replays to show that Tim Paine had completed the catch diving forward. Pakistan looked like they might not even bat out their overs after they stumbled to 47 for 4 in the eighth over.

    Umar's recovery won Pakistan the game, and earned him the Man-of-the-Match award. There was no world trophy on offer, but the win will give Pakistan confidence ahead of their long tour of England. And a confident Pakistan is a dangerous Pakistan.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/pakistan-v-australia-2010/content/story/466148.html

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  2. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    2nd T20I: Australia v Pakistan at Birmingham, Jul 6, 2010

    Match scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/pakistan-v-australia-2010/engine/current/match/426393.html

    Aamer helps Pakistan to 2-0 Twenty20 win

    If Pakistan are a confidence team, their Twenty20 efforts over the past two days augur well for next week's first Test. A day after they ended their 12-match losing stretch against Australia across all formats, Mohammad Aamer helped them begin their own winning streak with an 11-run victory that brought 2-0 series triumph. Tests are a very different story, but their Twenty20 form has given the group a spark.

    There was a distinct sense of déjà vu after Monday's game; again there was a big crowd of Pakistan fans, again Pakistan scored around the 160 mark and again Australia's batsmen were tied down and couldn't lift their tempo for a successful chase. The last pair was left needing 19 from the final over and despite a six from Dirk Nannes, they came up short.

    Aamer made important late runs and then removed Australia's openers, but Pakistan had useful contributions from all their key men. Shahid Afridi made a quick 18 and grabbed two wickets, Kamran Akmal, Salman Butt and Umar Akmal all chipped in at the top of the order, and Shoaib Akhtar and Saeed Ajmal were hard to get away.

    The Rawalpindi Express was out of steam on Monday but had gained momentum 24 hours later. Akhtar has been driving around Birmingham in a red Ferrari over the past few days and perhaps the speedy number inspired him, for he was comfortably the quickest bowler in the match and hovered around 95mph.

    A couple of sizzling bouncers whizzed past the faces of Australian batsmen but the only man to fall to Akhtar was Tim Paine, who skewed an ugly swipe to mid-off. Akhtar had begun by conceding a pair of fours in his opening over as Michael Clarke showed the sort of Twenty20 form he has not displayed in recent times.

    Australia had rested Shane Watson, so Clarke took it upon himself to open the innings, finding the gaps and clearing the infield several times with well-judged chips and drives. Clarke had motored to 30 from 17 deliveries when he played on to Aamer, and the bowler was so pumped at his success that in his follow through he leapt in celebration and crashed into the departing Clarke.

    Aamer immediately apologised and the men exchanged a friendly pat on the arm, but Clarke was frustrated with himself for failing to push on. It was Aamer's second wicket - he had already trapped David Warner lbw for 1 - and he went on to finish with 3 for 27. James Hopes (30) and David Hussey (33) worked the ball around through the middle overs but boundaries were few and far between, and too much work was left too late.

    Australia had set themselves a task by allowing Pakistan to reach almost the same score as won them the game on Monday. A late 20 not out from Aamer was especially valuable and included a pair of sixes off the debutant spinner Steve O'Keefe and David Hussey. The spinners bowled well, and O'Keefe finished with 3 for 29, which was an impressive return for a man who hadn't played a Twenty20 for his state for nearly 18 months.

    Afridi and Umar Akmal provided a key partnership for Pakistan; their 30-run stand included one monstrous six from Afridi, who slapped Shaun Tait straight back over the bowler's head. The ball cleared the construction area, put a cameraman at risk, and exited the stadium to the roars of the Pakistan fans.

    Nannes (3 for 30) collected them both in consecutive balls in the 17th over, Umar (25) caught and bowled when his top edge flew so high that almost any member of the infield could have run in and claimed it, and Afridi caught behind for 18. Already, Butt and Kamran Akmal had given them a strong start with a 61-run combination.

    The left-arm spinner O'Keefe struck in his first over when Butt top-edged a sweep and was caught at short fine leg for 31. Kamran followed soon afterwards for 33 when he skied a pull off Mitchell Johnson and was caught by Clarke running back at midwicket. O'Keefe had helped give Australia a way into the middle order, but they couldn't make it count.

    If Pakistan were surprised by the selection of O'Keefe, they must have been even more taken aback at Clarke's choice of opening bowler. David Hussey sent down the first over - the first time Australia had opened with a spinner in a Twenty20 international - and it was a success, a wicket-maiden that included Shahzaib Hasan lbw trying to slog-sweep.

    The day began in triumph for Australia; it ended in jubilation for Pakistan. It has also set the scene for a fascinating Test series.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/pakistan-v-australia-2010/content/story/466322.html

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  3. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Pakistan tour of Sri Lanka, 3rd Test: Sri Lanka v Pakistan at Pallekele, Jul 8-12, 2012

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/562446.html

    Hill-country Sri Lanka was lush from months of rain, and offered the opposite to Colombo: a juicy Test pitch for bowlers to sink their teeth into. Mahela Jayawardene's gamble in inserting Pakistan for a second game in a row, after winning his third toss of the series, this time proved the right one, as his bowlers reduced them to 56 for four, then 226 all out. It was hardly the ideal platform for the series-levelling assault Pakistan had in mind.

    Sri Lanka fielded four seamers in their line-up for the first time at home since July 2009. Perera, scourge of Pakistan in the one-day series but surprisingly left out of the first two Tests, extended his upward curve with a fine career-best display of swing bowling in favourable conditions that fetched him four of the top five. They included the two big century-makers from Colombo, Mohammad Hafeez and Azhar Ali, plus Misbah-ul-Haq, whose demise ended a pesky fourth-wicket stand of 85 with Asad Shafiq.

    Dilhara Fernando, on his 17th comeback to the Test side, bowled too short, but inflicted an important blow by fracturing Adnan Akmal's left ring finger with a sharp delivery. Adnan was unable to keep wicket due to the pain, and had to hand over the gloves to the part-timer Taufeeq Umar, who did a fine job in the circumstances.

    Sri Lanka's joy was short-lived, as the whippier pace of Junaid Khan and Mohammad Sami reduced them to 44 for three by stumps. Sangakkara, whose near-double-hundreds in the first two Tests had shut Pakistan out, was this time tormented by Junaid's inward movement: almost lbw to the first two balls, he had his stumps rearranged by the third.

    The hosts' recovery, after a blank second day, was prompted by two of the most defensive players in modern cricket, Paranavitana and Samaraweera - both in desperate need of a score. They gritted out 143 in 47 overs, clearing the floor for the carefree pair of Perera and Kulasekara, who had given Pakistan such a headache with the new ball and now indulged in a stand of 84, helping Sri Lanka to a handy lead of 111. Pakistan's catching was shoddy: the usually reliable Younis Khan spilled Samaraweera on 49, and Misbah dropped Perera on 22, both off the luckless Umar Gul.

    Pakistan had to do it the hard way if they were to level the series and maintain their unbeaten Test series record under Misbah. They wiped out the deficit with only two wickets down, and steadily built a lead on Azhar Ali's third century against Sri Lanka, and Asad Shafiq's second in all Tests; here, even in a vain effort, was the future of Pakistani batting. On a gently turning pitch, Azhar - in another technically assured innings - was able to step out and drive Herath, who became the third Sri Lankan, after Muralitharan and Vaas, to take 100 Test wickets at home.

    Shafiq, though, was the key to averting defeat and setting a target. He was assisted by a brave performance from Adnan, who came out to bat late on the fourth evening, following painkilling injections, and returned next day to defend stoutly for an hour and a half and see Shafiq to his hundred. They added 81 and were helped by a slightly negative approach from Jayawardene, who set spread fields for Shafiq, apparently having given up hope of dismissing him.

    Misbah left Sri Lanka a theoretical target of 270 in 71 overs. They set off positively and, when Chandimal and Sangakkara were together, an aggressive tilt looked possible. But the quality of the Pakistani attack, and Sri Lanka's narrow lead in the series, were such that, once the breakthrough was achieved, the shutters came down. The appearance of Samaraweera in his customary position at No. 5, ahead of the strokemakers Mathews and Perera, was the final proof. Hands were shaken nine overs from the scheduled close, confirming Misbah's first Test series defeat as captain.

    "No one gave us a chance, even in the one-dayers," said Jayawardene. "I remember in the first press conference someone asked about a 4-1 win for Pakistan. But to come out winning the one-dayers and Test series, we should take a lot of credit."

    Man of the Match: Asad Shafiq. Man of the Series: K. C. Sangakkara.

    Close of play: first day, Sri Lanka 44-3 (Paranavitana 13); second day, no play; third day, Pakistan 27-1 (Mohammad Hafeez 8, Azhar Ali 6); fourth day, Pakistan 299-8 (Asad Shafiq 55, Adnan Akmal 0).

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/672527.html

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  4. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Pakistan tour of Sri Lanka, 1st ODI: Sri Lanka v Pakistan at Dambulla, Jul 11, 2015

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/860269.html

    Hafeez finds form to subdue Sri Lanka

    There was a big cloud hanging over Mohammad Hafeez ahead of the first ODI against Sri Lanka in Dambulla. He had managed only returns of 98 runs and three wickets in four innings before missing the series-deciding Test in Pallekele to undergo tests on his bowling action. He replied by getting impressive drift, turn and bounce, claiming his personal best figures of 4 for 41 in 10 overs, including a maiden before marshalling the chase of 256 with his tenth ODI century, the last four of which have come against Sri Lanka.

    Hafeez rolled into action right away, after the hosts were inserted. He began by removing left-handed batsman Kusal Perera off his third delivery. He would eventually cap his spell with the wicket of another left-hand batsman, Thisara Perera, off his last ball.

    Sri Lanka, however, were hauled to a competitive total by Dinesh Chandimal, who profited from controlled bottom-handed heaves and slog-sweeps to strike an unbeaten 65 off 68 balls.

    The hosts' momentum, though, faded away quickly in the chase, with Azhar Ali and the recalled Ahmed Shehzad beginning strongly. They set up Pakistan's ninth fifty-plus opening partnership in their last ten ODIs before both were out caught behind, fishing outside off. Hafeez struggled with his timing early on, dragging and hacking balls over the leg side but settled down after his fifty and underpinned Pakistan's reply against a Sri Lankan attacked that lacked bite and direction despite some assistance from the pitch. Lasith Malinga and Seekkuge Prasanna went wicketless while conceding 128 together in 17 overs.

    The change of gears from Hafeez was stark: the first fifty took 58 balls while the second took only 35. After lifting Thisara over point, Hafeez pumped his fist, hugged Shoaib Malik, the first and the only other Pakistan player to have produced a four-wicket haul and a century in an ODI.

    Two balls later, Hafeez popped a return catch to Thisara but by then the equation was clawed down to 58 off 85 balls. Malik then picked up the mantle, waltzing to his fifty and sealing victory by launching Tillakaratne Dilshan over long-off with six wickets and 28 balls to spare. Malik used his feet adeptly and crunched four fours and two sixes in his 45-ball 55.

    It was Mohammad Irfan, though, returning to the ODI team after recovering from a stress fracture of the pelvis suffered during the World Cup, who bustled in and set the tone in the morning. Bowling with the wind, Irfan extracted trampoline bounce and zip, often clocking speeds north of 140kph. Azhar let him rip in short bursts; Irfan had the batsmen and Sarfraz Ahmed swaying and slithering before Hafeez made the incisions.

    After nabbing Kusal for 26, Hafeez undid another left-hand batsman in Upul Tharanga with sharp turn. Two overs later, Hafeez bowled Dilshan with subtle variation in flight and length. Dilshan's innings was scratchy: he threw his bat at balls outside off which swerved past the outside edge and he skewed attempted off-side drives through midwicket. His score at various points read 3 off 9, 19 off 35, and 35 off 58 before he was dismissed for 38 off 65 balls.

    Dilshan could have been removed for 2 in the third over had Irfan not overstepped before Sarfraz snaffled a heathy nick. The next ball, a free hit, was flapped straight into the lap of mid-on. But Dilshan could not push on. Lahiru Thirimanne and Tharanga did not fare any better either, giving it away for 23 and 20.

    The fabled pair of Kumar Sangakkara and Mahela Jaywardene was not around, but Angelo Mathews and Chandimal, converted promise into substance, adding 82 for the fifth wicket. Chandimal's previous ODI innings - 52 off 24 balls - relied more on muscle and nearly pulled the rug from under Australia's feet in the World Cup before he was out injured. This was a more measured innings. He nudged the ball into the gaps and found release through the occasional offbreaks of Malik and Yasir Shah, who couldn't replicate his threat in the Tests.

    Just as Sri Lanka shaped for a late surge, Yasir logged himself into the wickets column with his penultimate ball when he forced a top edge from Mathews to long-on for 38 off 54 balls. Rahat engineered a double-strike in the 49th over, but Chandimal's half-century and a spunky cameo from debutant allrounder Milinda Siriwardana left the crowd bounding in the papare. It was short-lived, though, as Hafeez turned it on, again.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/sri-lanka-v-pakistan-2015/content/story/897181.html

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  5. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    1st Test: England v Pakistan at Lord's, Jul 13-17, 2006

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/225255.html

    At Lord's, July 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. Drawn. Toss: England.

    The final day might have turned into a classic but, as the match dwindled to a draw in roasting heat, it became clear that the game had been dominated by those who weren't there. Whether Michael Vaughan would have made a more aggressive declaration is impossible to say; had Andrew Flintoff been fit, however, giving England five front-line bowlers, it is fair to assume the timing would have been less conservative. As it was, Andrew Strauss, in his first Test as captain, chose to bat on for half an hour on the fifth morning, setting Pakistan an unlikely 380 to win in 80 overs. They never threatened the target, but neither did England ever look like taking ten wickets, even after Hoggard removed Salman Butt with the first ball of the innings.

    Winning, they say, is a habit, but so too is losing: after England's 5-0 mauling in the one-day series with Sri Lanka, there was a sense that the ship needed steadying. Memories of their failure to bowl out Sri Lanka a second time at Lord's earlier in the summer, and of India's late assault in Nagpur earlier in the year, presumably played a part in Strauss's decision, as did the thought of Shahid Afridi - described by Hoggard as the world's most intimidating batsman - running amok in the final session. It did not help that two of the four bowlers England did have were not fully fit.

    Harmison was still struggling to rediscover his rhythm after a shin injury, while Hoggard had needed stitches in his hand after it was trodden on at Canterbury the previous week. Harmison showed patches of form in the first innings, but was generally out of sorts. He produced a lifting beauty to have Faisal Iqbal caught by a leaping Collingwood at slip on the second evening, and generated something like his old hostility against Mohammad Yousuf just after lunch on the final day, but by the end he was struggling to bowl at even Inzamam-ul-Haq's body.

    Panesar might have had more than two wickets, but he did get the one that mattered. In the first innings, Yousuf had rescued Pakistan from 68 for four, batting seven hours 48 minutes for an implacable double-century, which featured 26 fours and a six in 330 balls. He bowed his forehead to the turf on reaching each hundred, and afterwards thanked Allah; his 202 followed 223 in his previous Test innings against England, at Lahore in December. On the last day, Yousuf looked in control until he mysteriously neglected to offer a shot to a ball from Panesar pitching on middle and leg. It was left to Inzamam, unruffled as ever, to steer his side to safety, striking a record ninth consecutive half-century against the same opposition.

    Pakistan seemed happy enough with the draw, given their injury problems. Their batting line-up was missing vice-captain Younis Khan and Shoaib Malik but, although their top order failed again, the more significant absentees were Shoaib Akhtar and Mohammad Asif, which blunted the pace attack's edge. Too much on the first day was short and wide: England raced to 60 in 11 overs and, though three quick wickets briefly made that look like a false start, soon continued to profit from the waywardness.

    The indiscipline spread to Pakistan's catching. Collingwood offered Kamran Akmal the most regulation of caught-behind chances on 79; he went on to 186 (England's 700th Test century), combining his trademark grittiness with some crashing cut shots, further vindication of Duncan Fletcher's faith. Cook was even more fortunate: he was let off three times as he lurched to what will surely be the scratchiest century of his career. Together they added 233, a record for England's fourth wicket against Pakistan, beating Ted Dexter and Peter Parfitt's 188 at Karachi in 1961-62.

    The tail hung around long enough for Bell to score England's third century of the innings, and their 100th at Lord's in 111 Tests since 1884. He edged his first ball just past slip, but from then on played sensibly and fluently - if in the anonymous style his detractors see as diffidence. Bell played expecting to be discarded, whatever he did, to make way for Flintoff 's return at Old Trafford; in fact, Flintoff 's relapse reprieved him. If there is a positive to the injuries plaguing England's captains, it is that the chance of a permanent vacancy has brought out the best in the fringe players.

    Strauss drew criticism for delaying his first declaration, too, until after tea on the second day. But it is more probable that England's chances of victory disappeared on the fourth afternoon, when they lost wickets each time a charge felt imminent. Pietersen, the man most likely to mount a match-winning assault, looked uneasy, taking 14 balls to get off the mark, and squirting a four through cover off the leading edge, before being outwitted by Afridi and stumped.

    Collingwood fell quickly, and Bell had just driven two fours off successive balls when he was run out, the victim of Strauss's eagerness to reach his hundred and a direct hit from Inzamam. Strauss did become the third England player to score a century on his debut as Test captain - following Archie MacLaren and Allan Lamb - in the next over, but his celebration, like his leadership, was muted.

    Man of the Match: Mohammad Yousuf.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/292016.html

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    Last edited: Jul 13, 2016
  6. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Pakistan tour of West Indies, 1st ODI: West Indies v Pakistan at Providence, Jul 14, 2013

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/645635.html

    Awesome Afridi flattens West Indies

    "Who writes your scripts?" England's legendary allrounder Ian Botham was asked after taking a wicket first ball on his Test comeback in 1986. The same question can be asked of another flamboyant cricketer today as Shahid Afridi turned in one of the greatest all-round ODI performances to flatten West Indies in his comeback game.

    With Pakistan axing a whole host of experienced players in recent months - including Younis Khan, Shoaib Malik and Kamran Akmal - there had been murmurs over whether Afridi's ODI career should have been given yet another lifeline. He's someone who sees himself as a bowling allrounder in recent years, and with no wickets in six previous ODIs, the doubts were justified. Afridi squashed them, and how - a game-transforming half-century and then thesecond best one-day bowling figures of all time.

    Even in a career as wildly fluctuating as his, there can be few moments when the turnaround in fortunes is this stark. It is the ability to deliver these truly gobsmacking performances that has earned him a loyal legion of fans, who swear by him even during extended runs of failures.

    Before he walked in to bat on a drizzly morning in Providence, Pakistan's top order had once again keeled over against the moving ball as Jason Holder delivered a searing new-ball spell of 8-4-8-4. The manner of those dismissals would have been as demoralising for Pakistan's fans as the scoreline, with two top-order batsmen being bowled when looking to leave the ball.

    Misbah-ul-Haq was playing his usual hold-the-innings-together role scoring at about a run an over, but when Afridi strode out, he was immediately looking to score at a run a ball. Pakistan were 47 for 5 and the team's last recognised batting pair was in the middle, but that didn't prevent Afridi from launching his third delivery for six over long-off. Given his kamikaze style of play, a quick end to his innings wouldn't have surprised. It almost did after he belted another six and a four, but Chris Gayle put down a tough chance at slip.

    After that, he could take lesser risks despite scoring rapidly as West Indies' bowlers offered several boundary balls. Marlon Samuels offered long hops and full tosses that were dispatched beyond the rope, Darren Sammy was cleverly dinked over the shoulder before his half-volley was pounded through extra cover to bring up the half-century off 35 deliveries. The man who was expected to be the biggest threat, Sunil Narine, was caned out of the attack, taken for 32 in three overs.

    On a track where the rest of the Pakistan team combined to score 120 off 245, Afridi plundered 76 off 55, showing the insouciance and big-hitting that typifies his batting. Misbah added to his ever-expanding collection of ODI half-centuries as well, on a track which he called one of the toughest he has come across, and his partnership with Afridi underlined how two vastly different styles of batting can both be crucial to the team's cause. Their efforts drove Pakistan to 224, which seemed like a challenging target for West Indies.

    Twenty minutes into the chase, that seemed a far larger score as West Indies were reduced to 7 for 3, the second lowest score for which they have lost three wickets in ODIs. It began with Mohammad Irfan's swinging, 146kph low full toss that resulted in a golden duck for Johnson Charles in the first over. The pace and bounce of Irfan disconcerted the batsmen, with Darren Bravo the next to go, caught down the leg side.

    The biggest breakthrough, though, came through a direct hit from Misbah at cover, catching Chris Gayle well short while attempting a single that would have been tough for the quickest of runners, but was hara-kiri for a slow-mover like Gayle. Pakistan knew well the importance of that wicket - Misbah was midway through celebrating the dismissal when he was swamped by his joyous team-mates.

    Marlon Samuels and Lendl Simmons then cut out all risk, and played ultra-cautious cricket against some top bowling from Pakistan. "Huge pressure is there, huge pressure," wicketkeeper Umar Akmal frequently reminded the batsmen. The biggest strength in the Pakistan line-up is the quality they have across their bowling, with no major weak links.

    With Simmons and Samuels batting out 15 overs - and scoring only 34 on a turning track - the required-rate had crept above six, but West Indies were still optimistic of winning. Afridi was only brought on as the sixth bowler, but there was no stopping him from being the headliner. In his second over, he had Simmons stumped and Dwayne Bravo lbw next ball. He was showing off his famous starman celebration, and West Indies' chances were evaporating.

    His mix of legspinners, quick sliders, the occasional googly and even the odd offbreak proved too much for West Indies' batsmen. Kieron Pollard's had three ducks in his previous four ODI innings, and his lack of confidence was apparent, as he holed out to long-off for 3. Not long after, Afridi had Samuels lbw with a delivery that turned in. The big crowds that had turned up in Guyana knew the game was up and headed for the exit.

    Afridi's five-for came soon after as Kemar Roach handed a simple return catch, and his figures were an unbelievable 6-2-6-5, with every delivery seemingly a wicket-taking one. He didn't strike in the next couple of overs though and was taken out of the attack, before being brought back six overs later as Sammy and Narine somehow survived the other bowlers. They didn't last against Afridi, though, who needed only one over to wrap up the match and consign West Indies to their lowest ever total in a home ODI.

    The fans in Guyana had been starved of international cricket for two years after a conflict between the government and the country's cricket board, and while they were treated to an awe-inspiring performance from Afridi, they would have wanted more from the consistently misfiring West Indian batting.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/west-indies-v-pakistan-2013/content/story/651253.html

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  7. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Pepsi Asia Cup, 2nd Match: Bangladesh v Pakistan at Colombo (RPS), Jul 16, 1997

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65693.html

    At R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, July 16. Pakistan won by 109 runs. Toss: Pakistan. International debut: Sheikh Salahuddin.

    Pakistan recovered magnificently to run up 319 for five, the highest total ever in the Asia Cup. The previous best was their own 284 for three off five fewer overs, also against Bangladesh, at Chittagong in 1988-89. Aamir Sohail went for a duck to his first ball, but Saeed Anwar defied a fever to hit 90 off 94 balls, with 11 fours; the other main batsmen put the game beyond Bangladesh's reach. Off-spinner Saqlain Mushtaq took five wickets to dismiss Bangladesh for 210, a total depending heavily on opener Ather Ali Khan and captain Akram Khan.

    Man of the Match: Saeed Anwar.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/151652.html
     
  8. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Asia Cup, 5th Match: Hong Kong v Pakistan at Colombo (SSC), Jul 18, 2004

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65710.html

    Malik and Younis blow away Hong Kong

    Younis Khan and Shoaib Malik scored well-paced centuries, shared a 223-run partnership, and took Pakistan to 343 for 5, a score that ended the match as a contest at the half-way stage. Once this huge score was on the board, Hong Kong came under immense pressure and folded for 169, as Pakistan romped home by 173 runs. Persistent rain interruptions reduced the target to 339 from 47 overs, but this didn't make the slightest bit of difference to the eventual result. This sobering loss ended Hong Kong's brief association with one-day international cricket for the moment, as they were knocked out of the Asia Cup.

    Hong Kong's best chance - and that was a minute one - lay in restricting Pakistan to less than 250. Their bowlers kept them in the match against Bangladesh, restricting them to 221, and a similar effort was needed to keep Pakistan quiet. And Khalid Khan, the left-arm seamer, snapped up both the openers and gave them a glimmer of hope. But all thoughts of restriction were squashed when Younis joined Malik and displayed a whippet-like urgency between the wickets and improvised with ease. Then came the torrent in the last 10 overs and the total went way beyond Hong Kong's reach.

    Malik has been a handy customer while coming in lower down in the order and smashing it around towards the end, but hadn't replicated the same success at No. 3. Yesterday he fell to a needless run-out, but he made sure he didn't miss out today. He began with a flurry of boundaries, shifted to a lower gear for a short while in the middle overs before launching into an assault towards the end. Loose balls, which were readily available, weren't spared and the run-rate was constantly hovering around the five-and-a-half per over mark.

    Younis, who has been in and out of the Pakistan side, also missed out yesterday and hadn't scored a fifty for nearly a year. His cheeky glides and paddle-sweeps put the bowlers completely off their rhythm and the running between the wickets, along with Malik, kept them within sight of a 300-plus total. Younis, who made nearly 70 runs behind the wicket, swept consummately in the arc between fine-leg and midwicket. Around the 40-over mark, both batsmen shifted to clatter mode and kickstarted the barrage of fours and sixes.

    Malik, whose hundred came at a run-a-ball, finally fell for 118 as he was caught short of his crease by a direct hit (274 for 3). This was Malik's third century in one-dayers and included ten fours and two towering sixes. Younis brought up his maiden one-day hundred a shade faster, off 99 balls, and went on a rampage soon after. Abdul Razzaq, an ideal batsman to have in such a situation, joined in the fun and helped propel the total past 300. Younis's last 44 runs came in only 23 balls, before holing out to Nadeem at midwicket and the last 10 overs produced 105 runs.

    Chasing 344 is monumental in itself, but having to do so under murky skies with Mohammad Sami and Razzaq producing some unplayable balls makes it almost impossible. Hong Kong crawled along for most of the innings barring a cameo from Tabarak Dar in the middle. After Nasir Hameed was out to the third ball, Tim Smart and Alexander French shared a painful partnership, with French hardly looking for any scoring opportunities. Both were beaten on several occasions and Smart was finally out to Razzaq with Younis completing a sharp chance at second slip (45 for 2).

    Dar's six boundaries, four of which were crisply struck, added a coating of vim to the lethargic afternoon. He went after anything short that Naved-ul-Hasan dished out and even dug out a yorker and sent it speeding to the long-off fence. Malik's fuller one finally did him in as he was bowled trying to sweep from outside the off (95 for 3). French fell in the very next ball, playing on to Farhat, and that triggered a mini-procession. Farhat struck two more quick blows and Sami came back and pocketed the wicket of Ilyas Gul (102 for 7).

    Razzaq put in an improved performance after a lacklustre show yesterday but the extras bug haunted all the bowlers - they sent down 18 wides and seven no-balls. Manoj Cheruparambil and Afzaal Haider delayed the inevitable in fading light, before Malik wrapped up the tail and completed a great day at the office. Similar days, though, will be vital when the second round of matches begins on Wednesday.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/story/137996.html

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  9. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Pakistan tour of West Indies, 3rd ODI: West Indies v Pakistan at Gros Islet, Jul 19, 2013

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/645639.html

    West Indies steal tie off panicked Pakistan

    After 97 overs of play, Pakistan were clearly the better side on the day, and by some distance. Needing 39 off the last three then, with only two wickets in hand, West Indies managed to induce an almighty panic in the Pakistan ranks, which included the first boundary hit off Saeed Ajmal - three came in one cluster now; a fielder failing to pick the ball in the deep, costing them three runs; poor field settings in the last over with 15 to defend against the last pair of Jason Holder and Kemar Roach; and then an easy run-out fluffed off the last ball to allow West Indies a tie. West Indies celebrated as if they had won, and Pakistan were crestfallen, which was about right.

    Pakistan will think of the erroneous call of a short run that went against them when Umar Akmal and Wahab Riaz were taking 52 off the last 4.2 overs. The two same men would now commit the final fatal mistakes. Before that, though, it was Sunil Narine who turned the momentum. Ajmal had been all over West Indies with the wickets of Lendl Simmons, who scored 75, and Dwayne Bravo in his ninth over to turn 62 off 42 with six wickets in hand into 39 off 18 with just two wickets standing.

    With nothing left to lose, Narine swung and he swung clean. The first ball went flat over long-off, inside-out no less. Ajmal fired the next ball in, and Narine drilled it to long-on, but Riaz there moved to his left as opposed to right where the ball was. The angry Ajmal slowed the next ball down, and drew a dot, but Narine came down the wicket to send him to the left of long-off. Ajmal came back with a quick offbreak to peg Narine's off stump back, and it was down to 24 off 12 for Holder and Roach.

    Despite a flicked four past midwicket, Junaid did his job, giving away just nine in the 49th. The difference between Junaid and Riaz was the angle. Riaz bowled over the stumps but with the same field of mid-off up and long-on back. He began with two singles first up, but that mid-off remained a risky placement. As it turned out, Holder threaded - an incredible shot for a No. 11 - the third between mid-off and cover for four. More incredible acts were to follow.

    Riaz changed his length, and drew a dot with a short ball to make it nine required off the last two, but bowled length on the penultimate ball. Holder smoked it clean over extra cover. Dwayne Bravo would have been proud of that shot. Now they were panicking big time. A big conference resulted, but the field didn't change. Riaz bowled short, which more or less took the field down the ground out of the equation. Holder swung, got a thick edge, which flew to third man who was aptly stationed fine. Junaid fielded well and sent in a decent throw on a decent bounce but just to the right of the keeper.

    Holder was gone by yards had Akmal, a part-time wicketkeeper lest it be forgotten, collected it cleanly. He didn't. Holder made it. He over-ran so far West Indies couldn't even try a possible overthrow. The ball, though, had gone straight to straight midwicket.

    West Indies might have come out of this level in the series, but their approach of backing themselves to keeping pace with astronomical asking rates in the final few overs against an attack that has no obvious weak link is ill-advised. Chasing 230 on a good batting track, West Indies lost early wickets - as has become their wont - and consolidated so slowly that the asking rate crossed six in the 26th over. After the early blows, Pakistan had enough overs of Ajmal towards to all but ensure the victory.

    Pakistan followed the same pattern when they were asked to bat first. Ahmed Shehzad and Nasir Jamshed didn't do much better than Johnson Charles and Chris Gayle, the last of whom now has the worst average among all openers who have played at least 10 innings in the last 12 months. It was followed by slow rebuilding with Misbah-ul-Haq, like Simmons, scoring 75.

    At that time, the big difference seemed to be the West Indies part-timers at the death. Dwayne Bravo and Kieron Pollard on paper should have been no match for Ajmal and Junaid and Riaz. It seemed to be going down that route until pressure burnt off that paper, and a side that used to be the most feared in tight situations now added one more panic attack to their recent history.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/west-indies-v-pakistan-2013/content/story/653005.html

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  10. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Pakistan tour of Sri Lanka, 3rd ODI: Sri Lanka v Pakistan at Colombo (RPS), Jul 19, 2015

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/860273.html

    Pakistan batsmen, Yasir pummel Sri Lanka

    The third ODI ended badly for Sri Lanka, whose cricket team were pummeled by 135 runs, but it was made worse by an outbreak of violence in the stands, which forced a half-hour suspension of play. Rocks were thrown inside the southeastern stand, and when offenders were evicted from the ground, projectiles were thrown from outside the stadium, through the back of the same, open stand. One of these rocks made its way to the field, and match referee Javagal Srinath suspended play until the situation was brought under control by authorities.

    Sri Lanka's on-field loss, meanwhile, was set up by a commanding Pakistan batting performance, featuring a lively opening stand, two brisk fifties from Sarfraz Ahmed andMohammad Hafeez, and a sprint at the death that lifted them to 316 for 4. Sri Lanka began losing wickets in the sixth over, and never appeared to have the measure of the target. They were all out for 181 in the 42nd over, and now trail 1-2 in the five-match series.

    It was the hosts' bowling that faltered first, however, as a bare-bones attack produced another insipid showing. Sri Lanka made no changes to an attack that features only two specialist bowlers, and relied on four allrounders to deliver the lion's share of overs. Of the four wickets they claimed, two were run-outs. Malinga disappeared for 80 from his full quota, leaking 21 runs in his final over.

    All of Pakistan's batsmen made meaningful contributions but, batting from No.4, Sarfraz's 77 from 74 balls ensured their early gains were consolidated, and that his team were well-set for the late dash.

    Sarfraz was a dynamo at the crease, pilfering singles all around the wicket, and capitalizing on severe of errors of length. Equally adept against pace and spin, he scored at a run-a-ball at least against all bowlers except Angelo Mathews (seven runs off nine balls) and Tillakaratne Dilshan from whom he took six runs from seven deliveries. He might have provided the fireworks himself, had he not been run-out in the approach to the death overs.

    Ahmed Shehzad prospered in the arc between midwicket and long-on early in Pakistan's innings, crashing Angelo Mathews through that region off successive balls, while finding singles square either side of the pitch. Azhar Ali was not as aggressive, but was adept at turning the strike over. He became Pakistan's fastest batsman to 1000 ODI runs when he creamed Lasith Malinga through square leg in the eighth over. Making use of muddled lengths from Sri Lanka's seamers, the opening pair played and missed at one or two, but mustered a brisk scoring rate. They hit 55 runs from the first 10 overs, then 88 from the first 15. Though the occasional lofted stroke only just cleared the in-field, neither batsman seemed troubled by Sri Lanka's new-ball bowling.

    The hosts' breakthrough came in the 17th over, thanks in equal part to a well-executed short-ball plan and careless batting from Shehzad. Mathews and Malinga packed the leg side, deploying three men in the deep and two close, catching, as Malinga sent his first two balls at the batsmen's bodies.

    Expecting another one at his ribs next, Shehzad seemed to play a pre-meditated pull shot, but couldn't control his stroke when the ball came a little wider of off stump. He was caught by deep midwicket. Azhar also fell needlessly in the 24th over, when miscommunication with Hafeez found him well short of his ground on 49.

    Hafeez's knock was full of edges and mis-hits, but he chose his areas well, usually getting the ball to drop some distance from the fielders. Thisara Perera teased his outside edge with full-length deliveries occasionally but, as was the case with Nuwan Pradeep, could not build pressure on the batsmen for any length of time.

    Hafeez enjoyed milking Sachith Pathirana's left-arm spin, occasionally trekking down the surface to loft him straight or, more often, sliding back to turn him behind square. He was essentially the link-man between the two fast-paced ends of the innings and will be pleased to continue his good run with the bat, now that he plays as a specialist batsman.

    Though Sri Lanka managed to control the flow of runs briefly, after Sarfraz's exit in the 45th over, they were unable to prevent the final charge. Malinga, who had relied exclusively on slower balls for 13 straight deliveries, was brutally treated by Shoaib Malik and Mohammad Rizwan in the final over. The pair hit a six and three fours to finish the innings.

    Sri Lanka's opening batsmen were unable to reproduce their explosive success from Pallekele. Tillakaratne Dilshan holed out to mid-off for 14, and Kusal Perera was caught brilliantly by Sarfraz off Anwar Ali soon after. Lahiru Thirimanne attempted to get the chase back on track, but continued to lose partners. Upul Tharanga was stumped off Yasir Shah for 16 and Angelo Mathews ended a laboured 12-ball stay by sending a leading edge down long-off's throat.

    Thirimanne himself moved to a much-needed fifty, but when Dinesh Chandimal was dismissed soon after, leaving Sri Lanka at 130 for 5 in the 27th over, Sri Lanka's challenge was virtually done. On a turning track, Yasir ended up taking two more scalps to finish with 4 for 29, while Anwar Ali and debutant Imad Wasim, who bowls left-arm spin, had two apiece.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/sri-lanka-v-pakistan-2015/content/story/900555.html

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  11. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Australia tour of England and Ireland, 2nd Test: Australia v Pakistan at Leeds, Jul 21-24, 2010

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/pakistan-v-australia-2010/engine/current/match/426395.html

    Pak v Aus, 2nd MCC Spirit of Cricket Test, Headingley, 1st day
    Pakistan take charge as Australia crumble for 88

    Pak v Aus, 2nd MCC Spirit of Cricket Test, Headingley, 2nd day
    Ponting and Watson lead Australia fightback

    Pak v Aus, 2nd MCC Spirit of Cricket Test, Headingley, 3rd day
    Pakistan close in on rare Aussie victory

    Pak v Aus, 2nd MCC Spirit of Cricket Test, Headingley, 4th day
    Pakistan prevail in thrilling finale

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  12. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Who can ever forget this game? I still remember the nerves in the 2nd innings chase. And that first innings demolition of the Aussies was something special Amir, Asif and Gul were unplayable
     
  13. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Pakistan tour of West Indies, 4th ODI: West Indies v Pakistan at Gros Islet, Jul 21, 2013

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/645641.html

    Misbah, Hafeez secure lead in shortened game

    When the rain finally subsided to revise Pakistan's target to 189 in 31 overs, leaving them 121 to get in 14 remaining overs, West Indies' captain Dwayne Bravo was clearly not happy. He looked at the sheet of paper given by the umpire in disgust, and handed it over to a team-mate. Pakistan, who had eight wickets in hand, had to give up further Powerplay overs, but all of West Indies' main bowlers had bowled by then and didn't have many overs left. West Indies were sluggish, almost resigned, whereas Pakistan chased with intent, and took an unassailable 2-1 lead with only the final game to go.

    During the chase, Misbah-ul-Haq went past Wasim Akram's record of most ODI runs without a century, but saw Pakistan home with a cool unbeaten 53 off 43, which complemented Mohammad Hafeez's 59 off 62. The stand the two put together meant that Marlon Samuel's century earlier in the day, scored in what was then a 49-over game, and instrumental in setting up the biggest total of the series, went in vain.

    Until rain arrived, though, West Indies were doing it just right. They had weathered a quickish start from Pakistan, dried up the runs, eked out two wickets, but because only two batsmen had been dismissed, Pakistan's revised target was not out of reach. In hindsight, Misbah's decision to bowl in a series that no side had won chasing until then, and despite no forecast of rain, ended up giving them the advantage.

    The grumpy West Indies came out, and resumed with part-time bowlers at each end. Bravo himself began with a wide first ball after rain. Hafeez and Misbah, the unbeaten batsmen, seized the momentum, taking 17 off the first two overs. West Indies knew they could have given one of Sunil Narine, Kemar Roach and Jason Holder two overs, and the other two just an over each.

    Hafeez went after Holder, pulling him for two sixes in the 21st over. Even as Bravo continued to go for runs, bowling ahead of Darren Sammy who went for just 10 in three overs, West Indies turned to Narine at the other end. Pakistan played that over out peacefully, which brought the target down to 62 from 48.

    In the next over, Roach got slightly lucky with Hafeez's wicket, who played a square-drive straight to point. Shahid Afridi was closer to the miss on his hit-or-miss spectrum. When He fell, Pakistan needed 45 off 34.

    Misbah had quietly made 38 off 33 by then. And for company, he had Umar Akmal, who might have missed a stumping earlier in the day but was in good touch with the bat. The third ball he faced, he square-drove for four. After that, they calculated the chase well, choosing to sit back in Narine's final over, the 29th. However, towards the end of that over, Narine provided Misbah with a log hop, which he duly dispatched for six, bringing the equation down to 15 off 13. Seven of those 13 deliveries were not bowled as Akmal ran through the target in the 30th over.

    West Indies were left dazed, and it was not hard to see why. Earlier in the day, they had put up the best batting performance of the series, by either side, to break free from the middling range of 220-235. They were led by the return to form of the best batsman in recent times, Samuels, who converted a slow start - 19 off 33 - into the first century of the series - 106 off 104.

    The day began with rain, which reduced the game to 49 overs, and dampening news for Chris Gayle, whose recent poor form pushed him down to No. 5. Turned out it didn't save him from the new ball. The balls were only eight overs old when West Indies lost three wickets. Devon Smith, the man brought in as opening replacement for Gayle, managed to score his first run in three innings, but soon bottom-edged Mohammad Irfan through to the keeper.

    Gayle walked in at 63 for 3 to face the big test of having been demoted at this stage of his career. Like the rest of the series, Gayle was unsure again, and had two left-arm quicks, a variety that has troubled him of late, bowling at him. It should have become 64 for 4 immediately as Gayle followed Riaz outside off, but Hafeez spilled it. Gayle looked determined after that, and along with Samuels began to rebuild the innings.

    Samuels lost Gayle in the 30th over, after a 57-run stand, but the signs of a Samuels special had been there. The next 20 overs were all Samuels, although Lendl Simmons, Sammy and Dwayne Bravo were worthy support acts. Samuels either danced down to spin or sat back to set up base for big hitting off the quicks. Simmons continued his form at the other end, helped of course by a missed stumping.

    Ninety runs came off the last 10 overs with Samuels' century coming up with just one ball to go. He celebrated elaborately, letting out a scream and taking three bows. At the end of the day, when named the Man of the Match, he was bitterly disappointed.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/west-indies-v-pakistan-2013/content/story/653789.html

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  14. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    Pakistan tour of Sri Lanka, 4th ODI: Sri Lanka v Pakistan at Colombo (RPS), Jul 22, 2015

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/860275.html

    Shehzad, bowlers give Pakistan series

    For the third time in the series Pakistan denied those expecting drama and nerves and inexplicable events normally associated with Pakistan cricket. They first refused to let Sri Lanka get away despite a seemingly effortless 100-run second-wicket stand and dragged them down to 256, and then Ahmed Shehzad followed it with a ruthless chase of a target that could have been tricky on a dry turning surface. This was their first bilateral series win in Sri Lanka in nine years, and took them closer to Champions Trophy qualification.

    In fact even in the second match - the one that they lost - Pakistan were predictable and excellent. They just came up against individual brilliance of the Pakistani kind, and even after that record fastest fifty by Kusal Perera Pakistan fought to make sure it was not a cakewalk for Sri Lanka. There was no such out-of-the-world brilliance from Sri Lanka this time, but Pakistan retained that tenacity even though Lahiru Thirimanne and Tillakaratne Dilshan seemed in control scoring half-centuries after Perera fell for a duck. The fielders cut out the singles, the spinners choked supply of easy runs, the quicks struck to cash in on the pressure, and Sri Lanka went from 170 for 3 to score only 86 in the last 14 overs.

    As a comparison, in the next 14 overs there was enough evidence Pakistan were going to cruise through the chase. Sri Lanka finally went to using Lasith Malinga as an attacking option, but Azhar Ali and Shehzad took his first three overs for 20. When it seemed like pace on ball was flying, Sri Lanka went to spin only to see Shehzad jump out of the crease and belt Sachith Pathirana back over his head first ball for a six. Nuwan Pradeep injured himself, Suranga Lakmal looked ineffective, and already Malinga was back for a second spell. Malinga provided a breakthrough, but then had Shehzad edge through vacant slip and then through the hands of slip for successive fours. All in the first 14 overs.

    With his side 92 for 1 in the first 14, Mohammad Hafeez could now afford to take his time settling in. He also blunted out Malinga as he exhausted his nine overs in the first 20, looking desperately for a breakthrough. In Malinga's ninth, Shehzad suggested it wouldn't have made a difference had Malinga many more left in his bag. He whipped him for successive fours to reach 71, and Pakistan were now 116 for 1 in 20 overs.

    Let down by spinners, missing in-form attacking bowlers, Sri Lanka threw other options at Pakistan, but there were no batsmen willing to oblige those looking for what has in the last 10 or so years become inevitable drama with Pakistan matches. Shehzad and Hafeez batted with authority. While Hafeez accelerated from 7 off 24 to the eventual 70 off 88, Shehzad never really slowed down. The only regret for Pakistan will be that a rare moment of fielding brilliance - diving-forward catch by Perera at third man - from Sri Lanka resulted in Shehzad's falling five short of a hundred.

    Fielding brilliance was plentiful when Pakistan were in the field. From the time left-arm spinner Imad Wasim, playing only his second match, combined an arm ball with low bounce to remove Dilshan at 109 for 2 in the 23rd over, the fielders and the spinners circled around Sri Lanka. Often six men stayed inside the circle, and the spinners ran through their overs, building pressure dot by dot. Between them the three spinners - Yasir Shah, Wasim and Shoaib Malik - conceded just 108 in 24 overs.

    The first victim of the pressure was Mathews. Shah had been negotiated well by Dilshan and Thirimanne, but Mathews found it tough to face Wasim and Malik. With no easy singles on offer, Pakistan kept daring Mathews to take the risk. Nineteen runs came in Mathews' first 5.3 overs at the wicket, and when he looked to break the shackles he hit Rahat Ali - in his first over back - straight to mid-off.

    Dinesh Chandimal, seemingly thanks to instructions from the dressing room, sought to avoid a similar fate - Mathews scored 12 off 23 - and went on a hitting spree. He tried one ambitious shot too many, getting out to Mohammad Irfan for 20 off 21. Amid all this Thirimanne went on smoothly, driving and late-cutting his way towards a hundred. Now, though, with an inexperienced lower middle order with him Thirimanne had to make a decision: stay the anchorman and bat till the 50th over or hit a few shots to take some pressure off the youngsters.

    Thirimanne went for the latter. When he first tried the big sweep off Shah, he was dropped by Ahmed Shehzad at deep square leg, a catch he somehow went on to claim. An over later Thirmanne provided both Shah and Shehzad the redemption, trying another big sweep, mis-hitting it, and watching Shehzad fly to his left. An innings that had looked solid for a long time had slowly but surely disintegrated, setting Pakistan a target that would be hunted down with 9.1 overs to spare.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/sri-lanka-v-pakistan-2015/content/story/901645.html

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  15. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Pakistan tour of England, 4th Test: England v Pakistan at Birmingham, Jul 23-28, 1987

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/63464.html

    At Birmingham, July 23, 24, 25, 27, 28. Drawn. A placid Edgbaston pitch looked certain to produce a draw from the time Pakistan dealt comfortably with Gatting's decision to bowl first after winning the toss. The match, however, suddenly sprang to life after lunch on the final day, with England going close to achieving a remarkable victory.

    An incisive spell of fast bowling from Foster, supported well by Botham, brought a swift and unexpected end to Pakistan's second innings and left England with the difficult, but not impossible, target of 124 from the last eighteen overs. Given a brisk start by Broad, who made 30 of an opening stand of 37 in five overs, England should have levelled the series. However, Pakistan were able to harness the talents of Imran Khan and Wasim Akram throughout the run-chase, and without the one-day restrictions on short-pitched bowling and wides, or of fielding circles, England were kept in check as wickets fell. In the end they were just 15 runs short of their goal.

    Both captains later agreed that England, with their vast experience of one-day cricket, should have achieved victory; but it was Gatting himself who had to field a great deal of criticism, some of it particularly unsavoury in the tabloid press, on the first two days. He had assumed that, with Birmingham suffering as badly as elsewhere during the prolonged spell of wet weather, a greener than normal pitch might respond to his bowlers early in the match.

    It was surprising, therefore, that England chose to omit Radford from their twelve, at a time when he was the leading wicket-taker in the County Championship, and opted instead to play two spinners. This left England a pace bowler short, and Pakistan cashed in by reaching 250 for three by stumps on the first day. It was occupied throughout by Mudassar Nazar, who scored his ninth Test century, mainly in the company of Javed Miandad. Miandad made the most of being dropped at slip by Botham when 15 and scored 75 in a third-wicket partnership of 135.

    Rain and bad light delayed the start of the second day until 1.25 p.m. and there were several stoppages during the afternoon, one of which attracted particular attention. Umpires Whitehead and Meyer emerged from the pavilion, only to be left standing alone on the square, waiting to restart the game, while the England team remained in their dressing-room. It later emerged that no player was keeping a lookout, and while blame was later apportioned in several directions, England's absence was not well received. As it turned out, the light again deteriorated and the umpires, to the bemusement of the crowd, returned to their own quarters with England still nowhere in sight.

    In between the interruptions, Dilley slowed down the Pakistan advance by taking the wickets of Mudassar, after almost seven hours, Malik and Imran in the space of four overs on the way to only his second five-wicket return in Test cricket. But the tourists were then allowed to reach 439. Botham dropped Salim Yousuf when he was 4 and the wicket-keeper went on to score 91, his highest in fifteen Tests.

    England's response on the third day was dominated by an opening stand of 119 between Broad and Robinson. The innings faltered in the middle as Imran, extracting more from the pitch than any bowler previously, worked his way towards his 21st Test haul of five wickets or more; but Gatting, either side of the rest day, silenced some of his critics with a fighting 124. He batted for 6 hours 39 minutes, hit sixteen fours, and with help from Emburey and Foster, earned his side an 82-run advantage.

    Just under an hour was left of the fourth day when Pakistan began their second innings. There had been nothing to suggest that anything other than a draw would be achieved, and by lunch on the fifth day (74 for one) they had all but erased the arrears. Foster, however, sent a shiver of panic through the Pakistan dressing-room as Shoaib, Mansoor and Miandad were dismissed in quick succession. Botham lifted England's hopes further with an acrobatic return catch to account for Malik and followed up by bowling Ijaz. But a crucial break of thirteen minutes for bad light and a stubborn innings of 37 from Imran kept England in the field until the start of the final hour.

    England's pursuit of their target after the departure of Broad was hampered by these run-outs. Athey was involved, though not wholly to blame, in all of them, and in the later stages of the innings he could manage only 14 runs in seven overs - a disappointing performance that was to cost him his place in the Fifth Test.

    With poor weather dominating the first four days, the attendance was just 42,500 with receipts totaling £287,080. Thankfully, there was no repetition of the crowd trouble which had marred the one-day international between the two sides at Edgbaston in May. The match profits, however, were considerably reduced by the necessity of having a large police and stewarding presence on the ground throughout the five days.

    Man of the Match: M. W. Gatting.

    Close of play: First day, Pakistan 250-3 (Mudassar Nazar 102*, Salim Malik 13*); Second day, England 18-0 (B. C. Broad 14*, R. T. Robinson 2*); Third day, England 273-5 (M. W. Gatting 35*, I. T. Botham 16*); Fourth day, Pakistan 38-0 (Mudassar Nazar 6*, Shoaib Mohammad 32*).

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/151987.html

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  16. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Asia Cup, 10th Match: India v Pakistan at Colombo (RPS), Jul 25, 2004

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/65715.html

    Malik stars in Pakistan win

    Shoaib Malik kept Pakistan alive in the Asia Cup with a dashing 143 that propelled them to 300 for 9, and a 59-run win at the Premadasa Stadium in Colombo. There were some climactic moments at the end, with India just managing to avoid conceding a bonus point - a factor that could have a huge bearing on deciding the finalists.

    Halfway though the game, with the top order nearly all gone, India were out of it, and they targeted 241 instead - the score they needed to avoid conceding a bonus point. But with six runs needed in the last over, the tailenders pressed the panic button, and India nearly mucked it up. It all came down to running two byes and, thankfully for India, Moin Khan missed the stumps on both occasions. With Pakistan likely to beat Bangladesh on Tuesday, India will face a must-win situation - preferably with a bonus point - against Sri Lanka in the final league game on July 27.

    Malik was the architect of today's victory. He batted for almost 50 overs and his fourth century in one-dayers, which was also his highest score, set India a mountain of a task under lights. With useful support from the rest of the middle order, Malik ensured that runs came at a brisk pace throughout.

    This was an innings where Malik lived on the edge. The ball flew off his bat's edge, Virender Sehwag grassed two tough chances, Rahul Dravid missed a regulation stumping, the third umpire gave him the benefit of the doubt ... but amid all this there was effective improvisation and some crisp clattering. He got Pakistan off to a flyer after Imran Nazir fell in the first over, maintained the run rate and stepped on the gas at the end.

    For India, Irfan Pathan got them the early wicket and maintained some good pressure at his end, but it rained runs at the other, where Lakshmipathy Balaji might have been reminded of his disastrous one-day debut - when he conceded 44 off four overs against West Indies - as Malik cashed in on an erratic spell. A large number of balls were sprayed around, and the 61 Balaji conceded in seven overs handed Pakistan the initiative.

    Malik's accomplices in the middle overs played vital roles too. Inzamam-ul-Haq threatened to play one of his nonchalant masterpieces, but fell sweeping straight to Yuvraj Singh at square leg, after they had put on 66 in 77 balls (171 for 3). Yousuf Youhana slipped into the supporting role neatly and shared another rapid partnership with Malik; 63 came off just 9.3 overs. While 113 had come in the first 20 overs, 114 were scored between the 20th and the 40th.

    Malik continued his unorthodox methods - sweeping the seamers from outside off and slapping forehands over mid-off - and brought up his hundred in 95 balls. He was extremely lucky to survive a run-out chance when on 99, but inconclusive replays meant that he received the benefit of the doubt. He made 43 more before holing out to Mohammad Kaif at long-off. By then, though, he had made his highest score in one-dayers and it had come at a time when Pakistan's precarious position required a knock like this.

    India needed similar heroics to get anywhere close to 301 and, for a brief while, Sourav Ganguly and Sachin Tendulkar gave a whiff of what could have been. After Sehwag fell early - poking tentatively at a good-length ball from Shabbir Ahmed - a few overs of chilling drama followed.

    Shoaib Akhtar's fearsome run-up and bobbing hair were all on show, and the short balls were well-directed. Ganguly had a torrid time early on as a series of short ones had him groping tentatively, with one flying off the splice and landing short of third man. Having overcome that sizzling spell, Ganguly unfurled his innovative strokeplay. Backing away, he first glided Shoaib to the third-man fence and then carved Shabbir over cover for a stunning six.

    But just as the jitters seemed to have settled, Ganguly fell to a moment of indiscretion. He walked too far across the stumps to Mohammad Sami and the ball struck his thigh-pad before crashing into leg stump (79 for 2). From that point, Tendulkar lost partners at regular intervals as the batsmen succumbed to the pressure of the mounting run rate. Tendulkar played the anchor role, mainly nudging, running hard, and striking a few classical drives. After Kaif's run-out, going for a run that never was, the batsmen aimed to avoid conceding the bonus point, for which they needed 241.

    Once Tendulkar reached his fifty, there was a brief period when he displayed his full repertoire - he smashed Shoaib for two fours in an over, and then delectably scooped him to midwicket. But once he pulled straight to short midwicket, after making 78, India were struggling to reach that 241. Pathan's responsible 38 had an irresponsible ending, but it helped India inch towards getting the point. But much more drama ensued before the task was finally completed with two wickets in hand.

    After such a riveting one-day series earlier this year, it was tough to imagine any India-Pakistan encounter without a dramatic ending. But the Indian tailenders made sure that, despite a thumping loss overall, there was a gripping climax, albeit an unconventional one.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/story/138205.html

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  17. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Pakistan tour of West Indies, 5th ODI: West Indies v Pakistan at Gros Islet, Jul 24, 2013

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/645643.html

    Steady Misbah steers 3-1 triumph

    With his fourth half-century in five games this series, the world's leading ODI run-getter of 2013 shepherded his volatile band of batsmen home in another tricky chase. Misbah-ul-Haq battled falling wickets at the other end, a charged up Tino Best, and a rain interruption as late as the 98th over of the game to take Pakistan to their third successive away bilateral series win over West Indies. Yet again this series, Umar Akmal was called upon to overcome the asking-rate towards the end, and once more, he did not disappoint, delivering the series to Pakistan with a 3-1 margin.

    Misbah formed partnerships with Ahmed Shehzad, Haris Sohail and Akmal before falling in the last over trying to slog the winning hit, with the scores tied. He had already ensured Pakistan had won the series; a tie would have meant the margin would have been 2-1.

    When Sohail became the latest profligate Pakistan batsman to fall, chasing a wide Best delivery, Pakistan needed 83 from 12 overs. Best, having conceded 25 off his first three overs, was in the mood for a furious comeback. Pinging down bouncers in the mid-140s, he smacked one into Misbah's fingers. While the storm was being weathered by the captain, Akmal did his act at the other end.

    The inexperienced Jason Holder was taken for three successive fours in the next over, the 41st, the second of those coming off a poor effort at fine leg from Marlon Samuels. It wasn't the first time West Indies had messed up in the field today, and it wasn't to be the last. Akmal steered a short ball to the fine third man rope next ball. Holder cracked further under pressure, four leg-byes resulting off Misbah's pad down the leg side off the last ball of the over.

    Misbah managed a four off an inside edge to Sunil Narine next over and held his nerve to reverse-sweep the offspinner for four more. Then arrived the moment which once again highlighted what a farce a watered-down DRS has been in this series, in the absence of HotSpot. West Indies were sure Misbah had gloved a Best bouncer to the keeper down leg, the on-field umpire did not agree, and the third umpire had too much guesswork to do with only replays and sound as tools. Misbah was on 49 then, and Pakistan would have needed 53 of 46 had he been given. Darren Bravo had been given caught-behind on referral on the basis of sound earlier and West Indies had a right to expect consistency.

    Though Best predictably lost his temper, West Indies were not giving in. Dwayne Bravo, who often disappears for plenty at the death, delivered two tight overs. But Akmal found the big stroke when Pakistan sorely needed it. Narine was cut for four, Best was carted over mid-off for six. A top-edge flew over the keeper for four more, but even as clouds swept in over the stadium, Akmal holed out to mid-off for 37 off 28.

    A 20-minute break followed but Pakistan were ahead on D/L by five runs, and safe in the knowledge that the series was theirs, in case no further play was possible. Sunshine followed soon, though, and Shahid Afridi weighed in at the hit end of the hit-or-miss scale. Bravo was pulled for six over deep midwicket and punched past point for four. Game over? Not yet.

    Misbah hit Holder to short midwicket second ball of the final over, and Saeed Ajmal took three deliveries to get bat on ball. Had the throw from mid-on hit, it would have gone down to the final ball. It didn't, and Afridi and Ajmal hugged, as did their team-mates in the Pakistan dressing room.

    Credit for the win also went to Shehzad, who made his first substantial score of the series, and guided Pakistan's chase amid tight bowling from Narine and Darren Sammy. The pitch eased out further in the second innings. Cutting and pulling without trouble, Nasir Jamshed and Shehzad brought up Pakistan's first 50-run opening stand in 17 innings, excluding a game against Scotland.

    Trust Pakistan to blow such a rare promising start. Jamshed was stranded for the second game running, Shehzad taking a few steps and stopping this time, after Mohammad Hafeez in the previous game. Hafeez himself got a start and then had a heave at Sammy. However, Shehzad had Misbah to steady things.

    The opposing captain's cameo had earlier taken his side to to 242 for 7 from 170 for 6. Dwayne Bravo, with 48 off 27, was assisted by his predecessor, Darren Sammy, who made an unbeaten 29 off 18.

    The West Indies top six never managed any sort of sustained partnership. Two of them, Johnson Charles and Samuels, got forties, but were also the ones who struggled to score the most. Devon Smith fell early yet again. Chris Gayle and Lendl Simmons were unable to convert starts.

    Junaid Khan was outstanding, barring the last over when Sammy went after him, making a case for him to have played through the series. Mohammad Irfan was unlucky not to break through in his opening spell, but came back even stronger to remove Charles and Samuels. West Indies took 64 from the last five overs, but Misbah's calm and Akmal's aggression were enough to overhaul that.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/west-indies-v-pakistan-2013/content/story/654779.html

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  18. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Pakistan tour of England, 1st Test: England v Pakistan at Leeds, Jul 25-30, 1974

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/63128.html

    At Leeds, July 25, 26, 27, 29, 30. Drawn. This opening match of the series lacked only a final act to prevent it becoming a memorable drama. Unfortunately no cricket was possible on the fifth day.

    As the fourth day ended England needed 44 runs to win with only Fletcher of the specialist batsmen left while Pakistan needed to take four wickets. Both sides went away proclaiming that they would have done it, but it was impossible to know, for in a match in which neither side had managed to reach 300 predictability was the only quality missing.

    In England's favour it must be said that batting seemed less hazardous in the last innings of the match, yet at the same time Pakistan could claim to have outplayed their opponents in conditions in which England, with their seam bowling and batting experience, have always been regarded as invincible.

    The pitch was light-coloured and friendly looking, yet throughout it played like the greenest of green ones. The movement of the ball was extravagant, so that it was nothing for Arnold, that prince of bowlers when the gods are with him, to beat the bat four times in an over.

    The amount of movement varied considerably, so that in the end the consensus of expert opinion seemed to lean towards the theory that it had more to do with the density of the cloud than the texture of the pitch.

    At the end of the first day England seemed to be in a position of strength with Pakistan 227 for nine. Only Majid, who in the first half of his innings was beaten more regularly than anybody except Imran, and Zaheer Abbas, who shook the long held English belief that stroke players with high backlifts cannot prosper in this sort of cricket, held them up. Zaheer's back-foot strokes through the covers were the best of the match. Yet what turned out to be the most significant happening of the day came in the last over when Underwood put down a simple catch in the covers.

    Next day the last pair, Sarfraz Nawaz and Asif Masood, created a new Pakistan record by taking their partnership to 62, Masood blocking diligently and Sarfraz plunging a long way on to the front foot to make 53 with comparative ease.

    Suddenly England had a match on their hands and before the day was out they looked like losing it. They lost their second wicket at 69, their fifth at 100 and their last at 183. That they had a deficit of 102 was because Masood and Sarfraz bowled even better than they had batted. Seldom can two players have so dominated one day's Test cricket in differing roles. In support Imran bowled so well that Pakistan's three seam bowlers were a more destructive trio than England's.

    Yet it was Old, Hendrick and Arnold who brought England back into the game for a second time with the help of Greig, who emphasized his skill as a slip fielder by taking six catches and thus equaling a world record. Between them they dismissed Pakistan for 179 -- the third successive innings in which the seam bowlers appeared to possess magical qualities.

    This time it was Mushtaq who played and missed continually, yet stayed. It was another aspect of the benefit which overseas players have gained from playing in county cricket that they were now prepared to soldier on in these demoralising circumstances whereas in other times they had been known to retreat in confusion.

    With Lloyd and Amiss out for 22 England's hopes had all but disappeared. That they remained in sight at all was the result of some dropped catches and a sudden lessening in the amount of encouragement the bowlers received (significantly, the clouds were lighter and higher on the Monday). At last patience, technique and years of study of this kind of cricket began to come into their own. Encouraging them was the fact that 282 was no mountain of a score to aim at.

    After that depressing start they reached 174 before they lost their fourth wicket. The revival was inspired by Edrich, although that may seem a flamboyant way of describing an innings of 70 that lasted nearly five hours. Yet it was his courage, application and certainty of selection -- it failed him in the end when he was caught hooking a long hop -- that made the task seem possible. In similar vein Fletcher played well and then Sarfraz dismissed Greig and Knott cheaply. Full attendance 33,870; receipts £24,063.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/152539.html
     
  19. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Pakistan tour of England, 1st Test: England v Pakistan at Lord's, Jul 27-Aug 1, 1967

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/63007.html

    At Lord's, July 27, 28, 29, 31, August 1. Drawn. Pakistan emerged with much credit from this closely contested match. At one time they were reduced to desperate straits, but Hanif, their gallant and talented captain, defied the England bowlers for nine hours while making 187 not out, his solitary Test century in England.

    Asif Iqbal, batting number nine, emphasised his all-round ability by getting 76 at a crucial stage while his stand with Hanif yielded 130, a record for Pakistan's eighth wicket against all countries.

    Subsequently, England rain into difficulties, but a stand by their captain, Close and D'Oliveira who put on 104 for the fifth wicket in the second innings eased the situation.

    Finally, Pakistan were set to make 257 to win in three and half hours with the pitch still in good condition. They preferred to play for draw and their lack of enterprise could not be excused.

    At least they might have made some attempt at this reasonable target of 73 runs an hour, but Ibadulla and Burki scored only eight in forty minutes and 23 in the first hour. It was the sort of cricket that has caused attendances to fall so alarmingly at first-class matches in England. In reaching 88 for three wickets Pakistan averaged 32 runs an hour.

    For this Test, Pakistan called on four players outside the touring party holding professional engagements in the U.K., Ibadulla, Intikhab, Mushtaq and Nasim.

    Although England soon lost Milburn after Close had won the toss, sound batting by Russell, Barrington and Graveney took the total to 282 for two on the first day when half an hour's play was lost after tea due to inferior light. Coming together at 82, those two stalwarts Barrington and Graveney emphasised the value of class on the big occasion. For the first time Barrington hit a century in a Test at Lord's.

    Intikhab who bowled Russel round his legs with a beautifully flighted ball which dipped late, took this wicket in his first over and he waged a keen duel with the batsmen for most of the day. Salim and Asif bowled with plenty of life and generally the Pakistan attack proved efficient.

    Whereas only two wickets fell on Thursday, bowlers came into their own on the second day with twelve victims and England were left very much in the ascendancy.

    First there was a delay of seventy minutes following heavy night rain, for, although the pitch had been covered and was playable, worn patches on the tavern side of the square from previous matches were so wet that there was a possibility of the fieldsmen slipping about.

    In the end the umpires decided the fitness of the ground and after events left the impression that had play been resumed sooner, as Close desired, England might never have checked the landslide caused by some fine pace bowling by Salim and Asif.

    Within thirty-five minutes of the resumption England lost five wickets, those of Barrington, Graveney, Close, Murray and Illingworth, for the addition of 10 runs. Barrington, who hit seventeen 4's, had batted five hours, ten minutes for his 148 and his stand with Graveney (eleven 4's) realised 201 in three and three-quarter hours.

    At lunch England were 309 for seven, but afterwards D'Oliveira used the square cut and cover drive and when last out he had hit one 6 and nine 4's.

    Fine bowling by Higgs marked his return to the England team when Pakistan began their reply. He removed Ibadulla, Mushtaq and Burki and when late in the day Hobbs accounted for the dashing Majid, Pakistan finished with four wickets gone for 78.

    On the third day, Saturday, when play was restricted to four and a quarter hours, Pakistan put on only 155 runs while losing three more wickets. At times the score board scarcely moved, but the majority of the crowd of 18,000 appreciated Hanif's determined rearguard action.

    Just after lunch Asif joined Hanif in their big stand and when at five o'clock the game ended for the day Pakistan were 233 for seven. Hanif had then reached 102 in five hours, fifty minutes, and Asif 56 in two and a quarter hours.

    Despite a blistered hand which had kept Milburn off the field on Friday, he took his place and the misfortune to drop the most vital catch when Hanif was 51 and the total 121. The Pakistan captain hooked D'Oliveira and Milburn running in from below the Warner Stand failed to hold this surprise offering.

    Monday was Pakistan's day. With Hanif making more than half his side's runs -- he hit twenty-one 4's -- they finished only 15 runs behind England. Then, after both teams and officials had been presented to The Queen, they removed Milburn, Russell, Barrington and Graveney for 95, so that England, with one day left, wound up only 146 runs ahead with six wickets left.

    Victory was possible for either side at the beginning of the fifth day, but Pakistan saw their chance fade in the first ninety-five minutes, when d'Oliveira and Close raised their stand to 104. Hanif posted five men close to the bat for Intikhab and seven for the medium-paced Asif and not until the runs began to flow did he move his men farther afield.

    So England, who got themselves into trouble through the early batsmen pressing for runs, were able to set a reasonable task, which Hanif declined.

    Time lost during the match amounted to three and three-quarter hours. Pakistan scored only 442 runs in twelve hours, twenty-five minutes, while losing thirteen wickets compared with England's 609 runs in thirteen hours, twenty minutes for nineteen wickets.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/152389.html
     
  20. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Pakistan tour of West Indies, 1st T20I: West Indies v Pakistan at Kingstown, Jul 27, 2013

    Match scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/645645.html

    Babar takes Pakistan home off last ball

    You get a chance to play international cricket at 34, becoming the second-oldest debutant for your country. You are hit for six second ball. What do you do? You dismiss three key batsmen for just 23 runs. You are then called on to finish the game. With the bat. Understandably, you are tied down. But with six needed off six, you loft over extra cover for four. You think you have more than pulled your weight as a debutant. You have, but it is not over yet. It comes down to the last ball. One run needed. Everyone is in the circle. No sweat. You go big over mid-off, so big that you clear the rope. Zulfiqar Babar, welcome to international cricket.

    It should not have come down to the last ball the way Shahid Afridi sensibly steered the chase from 86 for 5. After that became 116 for 6, he did it with the tail for company. He made 46 off 27, but barring the 27th delivery, he hardly hit a desperate, reckless stroke. With eight needed off 11 though, he tried to seal it with a straight six, and mishit to long-on.

    West Indies sensed a chance. Babar played out a few dots. Despite that early boundary in the last over, Saeed Ajmal was run out off the fifth with the scores tied, before Babar roared one final time.

    The way they bowled and fielded, West Indies were lucky to have taken it down to the last ball. Shannon Gabriel took three wickets, but he crumbled under pressure each time he was called upon to deliver. Umar Amin, who played a blinder on T20 debut, took three fours off Gabriel's first over, with a flick and two pulls.

    Amin then took Samuel Badree apart on a turning pitch. Never giving the ball a chance to spin, he repeatedly stepped out to loft Badree down the ground. When the bowler dropped it short, Amin pulled. When he overpitched, Amin drove. Even as Amin was toying with West Indies, the hosts were striking at the other end.

    The Pakistan top order fell to miscalculated hits, but Amin's brilliance meant the asking-rate was always under control. That still didn't stop Amin from walking out to Samuels and getting stumped to make it 86 for 5.

    Afridi took over now, striking Samuels first ball for six over long-off and drilling the third to the extra cover rope. Thereafter, he settled down into cruise mode, rotating the strike, picking the odd boundary and also lofting Sunil Narine to become the first man to reach 400 international sixes. He did everything right except the stroke on the ball he got out to, but then, it was to be the debutant's day in the end.

    Babar, and the other Pakistan spinners, had shocked West Indies initially on the turner but the hosts recovered and then took apart the fast bowlers to post a challenging total. Dwayne Bravo and Kieron Pollard came together at 42 for 4 and put on 56 before Darren Sammycracked 30 off 14. Pakistan's slow bowlers did their job, taking 5 for 74 in 14 overs but the fast bowlers, missing the yorkers too often, disappeared for 1 for 73 in six. Mohammad Hafeez, who opened the bowling and dismissed the openers, gave himself just two overs.

    Babar squared up and bowled Lendl Simmons with his fourth delivery and in his next over, found himself in the way of a powerful hit from Samuels, but managed to hold on. Samuels had been cutting Mohammad Irfan for boundaries amid all the wickets.

    Bravo and Pollard, although not always in control, rotated the strike, a refreshing thing coming from a West Indies pair. Bravo was quick to hit with the turn through the off side, and Pollard made sure he put away the rare half-volleys for boundaries. Sammy went after the fast bowlers as he and Pollard looted 53 in four overs. As Sammy said after the game, 152 should have been defended on that pitch, but Babar was to have the perfect debut.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/west-indies-v-pakistan-2013/content/story/655827.html

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  21. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Pakistan tour of West Indies, 2nd T20I: West Indies v Pakistan at Kingstown, Jul 28, 2013

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/645647.html

    Akmal, bowlers give Pakistan T20 series

    Umar Akmal's 46 off 36 gave Pakistan the final surge to take them to 135, which their bowlers made look like 185 on a slow, dry and used pitch to give them the Twenty20 series to go with the ODI spoils. Pakistan threatened to leave Ahmed Shehzad's platform of 44 off 46 to waste, but Akmal did just enough - with 38 in the last four overs - for the bowlers, who were soon all over the West Indies batting.

    Sohail Tanvir's extra bounce accounted for Johnson Charles and Marlon Samuels, Mohammad Hafeez got Chris Gayle for the second time in two afternoons, and before you knew West Indies were 17 for 4. A strategic promotion for Sunil Narine injected some life into the chase as he scored 28 off 16, Kieron Pollard gave them late hope with 23 off 10, but they were fighting too much quality.

    After Charles edged Tanvir to Akmal, Gayle's horror home season continued as he fell to a leading edge; since his century in the first ODI of the tri-series earlier in the season, Gayle has not crossed 30 in 10 international innings, and has averaged 10.2. Samuels got a bit of a brute that kicked at him just outside off, and took the gove. Lendl Simmons soon played for a Shahid Afridi legbreak, but it didn't turn and took the middle stumps.

    As Dwayne Bravo fought hard, Narine swung merrily, and enjoyed some good timing and some good luck. The two added 47 in 5.3 overs, and brought the target down 72 off 39. Pollard took time to get going, and by the time he decided everything needed to go as West Indies needed 62 in four overs. Over the next four balls, he brought out some savage hits against the 34-year-old rookie Zulfiqar Babar, losing two balls and scoring 20 runs. Babar, though, went over the wicket, and managed to get the outer edge, which still carried to deep cover. Immediately, he got rid of Bravo, who also wanted to go over the off side but found long-off.

    In those two balls, the brief life in the chase had frizzled out. Not even a shambolic no-ball call - for the front foot cutting the side crease - could make any difference. In contrast, Pakistan might not have had any such spells of brilliant hitting, but they stayed around the six-an-over mark before going for the big runs in the end.

    West Indies seemed to have learned their lesson from having failed to defend 152 in the first game. They didn't give Pakistan any pace to hit. When the visitors ended the Powerplay at 39 for 1, it was the last time their run rate would reach 6.5 before Akmal's hitting in the 19th over. They had to fight a controlled West Indies effort throughout.

    Shehzad, who scored 44 off 46, found little support from the other end. Hafeez, opening in the absence of the dropped Nasir Jamshed, was caught on the late cut again. Umar Amin was done in trying to drive on the up. Haris Sohail swung before he got used to the pace of the pitch. Shahid Afridi hit Narine into the strong wind and in the air. Shehzad perished trying to pull Pollard, who had dug the ball in and provided no pace to go with.

    At 96 for 5 in the 16th over, it seemed Pakistan would struggle to get to a defendable total, but Akmal kept them in the game. Most of his good work came in the 19th over when Bravo went round the stumps and angled the ball across Akmal with little cover on the cover boundary. He was taken for a four and a six in the 16-run over, but Narine ended his good spell with just six runs in the 20th. As it turned out, Akmal had done enough damage by then.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/west-indies-v-pakistan-2013/content/story/656085.html

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  22. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Waqar Younis, Sachin Tendulkar share pleasantries on debut day

    November 15, 1989 will always go down in cricket history as the day when two greats of the game — a quick right-arm swing bowler Waqar Younis and legendary right-hand batsman Sachin Tendulkar — made their debuts in gentlemen’s game’s five-day format.

    The match, first of the four-Test series, was played between Pakistan and India at Karachi’s picturesque National Stadium. The encounter ended in a draw but the highlight of the match will always be that two impending greats of the game adorned the whites for the very first time.

    Twenty seven years have gone by since that historic moment and Waqar took to twitter on Tuesday to reminisce the memories of that very day.

    His tweet read: “Time gone quickly” On this day 27 years ago Me & the Great @sachin_rt made a debut at Karachi. Photos bring back all the wonderful memories.

    "Time gone quickly" On this day 27 years ago Me & the Great@sachin_rt made a debut at Karachi. Photos bring back all the wonderful memories pic.twitter.com/g2Hsm0gk1Z

    — waqar younis (@waqyounis99) November 15, 2016

    And amid all the political tension between Pakistan and India, which has hampered the prospect of any cricketing series between the two Asian giants, Tendulkar quoted Waqar’s tweet and recalled his memories of that day.

    He tweeted: “Playing for the country was always a dream. What a memorable moment it was! Time has flown quickly indeed, but you weren’t any slower either.”

    Playing for the country was always a dream. What a memorable moment it was! Time has flown quickly indeed, but you weren't any slower either https://t.co/eBm6nhK4pJ

    — sachin tendulkar (@sachin_rt) November 15, 2016

    Waqar, in the aforementioned match, bagged figures of 4-91 (four wickets in the first innings and none in second innings) which included bowling Tendulkar out for 15 off 24 balls. His other three victims were Sanjay Manjrekar, Manoj Prabhakar and Kapil Dev.

    Meanwhile, Tendulkar did not come out to bat in the second innings.

    Waqar ended his Test career with 373 wickets in 87 outings with 22 five-fors and five 10-wicket hauls. Sachin, meanwhile, played 200 Tests for India scoring a massive 15,921 runs at an average of 53.78 courtesy 51 tons and 68 half-centuries.

    Here is what happened in that match



    http://tribune.com.pk/story/1231971/waqar-younis-sachin-tendulkar-share-pleasantries-debut-day/
     
  23. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    1987 Bangalore Test — a win to savour

    It was March 1987, three decades ago, when Pakistan snatched victory from the jaws of defeat to win their first ever Test series in India. In days of home umpires, famous for their loyalties to the ‘home’ team, Pakistan had to swim against the tide at Bangalore, which they indeed did and emerged triumphant.

    India, the then world champions, were virtually unbeatable at home. On the other hand, the mighty West Indies, under the captaincy of Sir Viv Richards had just left Pakistan after a closely fought series.

    The concept of ‘neutral’ umpires was presented when two umpires, V.K. Ramaswamy and P.D. Reporter, officiated in two of the three Test matches.

    India failed to compliment ‘neutrality’ when Pakistanis arrived for a five-match series. Four Tests ended in high scoring draws. Tauseef Ahmed and Javed Miandad, who missed out the fourth Test at Ahmedabad, were back for the final Test at Bangalore (now Bengaluru). Imran Khan elected to bat on a spinning track on 13th March 1987. Pakistan managed a paltry 116 in the first innings, bamboozled by spinner Maninder Singh who captured 7 wickets.

    Although Saleem Malik top scored with 33, the last wicket stand of 18 between Tauseef and Iqbal Qasim proved vital as it took the visitors’ score past 100.

    In reply, the home side was well set at 102-4, but some brilliant work in the outfield reduced India to 145, restricting their lead to just 29. Pakistan’s spin twins Tauseef and Iqbal ripped through the Indians with 5 wickets apiece.

    After lunch on the second day, Pakistan started its second innings with Ramiz Raja and Javed Miandad. It was the second time in his career that Miandad had come out to open the innings, the previous occasion being in 1982 at Lord’s where, too, Pakistan had emerged victorious.

    The pair put on a valuable 45 runs before Javed was dismissed for 17. Despite chants and appeals going against them, ‘Imran’s tigers’ roared on. Saleem Malik put on 32 for the third wicket with Ramiz, and the same amount of runs with night watchman Iqbal Qasim for the fourth wicket to keep the scoreboard ticking. The day ended with Pakistan reaching 155 for five, gaining a lead of over a hundred.

    The case for neutral umpires was really strengthened when a half-hearted appeal tempted umpire Ramaswamy to raise his finger. Standing his ground, Iqbal Qasim showed his bat to the umpire, which made him reverse the decision.

    The second innings eventually ended on the third day at 249. An undefeated 41 from wicket-keeper Saleem Yousuf strengthened Pakistan’s position, as he put on 51 runs for the ninth wicket with Tauseef. Maninder managed 3 more wickets, completing ten-wicket haul in the match.

    Needing 221 to win, Sunil Gavaskar started the proceedings with dashing opener Kris Srikkanth. With just 15 on the board, India lost Srikkanth and Mohinder Amarnath on successive deliveries to Wasim Akram. A mini collapse by Tauseef was averted by a fighting Gavaskar and India ended day three at 99-4.

    16th March was a rest day, and both Pakistan spinners had a chance meeting with former Indian skipper Bishen Singh Bedi. During chit-chat, Bedi pointed out that his protégé Maninder Singh could have been more successful had he tried ‘not to spin the ball too much’.

    The ‘rest day’ did it for spinners and they did the rest the next day. On the fourth day, Iqbal tried ‘not to spin the ball too much’ and held remarkable return catches off Azharuddin and Ravi Shastri, reducing India to 155-6.

    Skipper Kapil Dev too left six runs later. Gavaskar, who earlier got a charmed life when the umpire turned down a catch from a diving Rizwan-uz-Zaman, was ironically caught by Rizwan in the slips; off Iqbal Qasim, when the target was still 41 runs away. He was dismissed four runs short of what could have been his 35th century.

    This also turned out to be the last Test of the legendary batsman, who became the first player to score 10,000 Test runs.

    With Tauseef removing Shivlal Yadav, the fate of the match hung in balance. At 192-9, Binny hit a massive six off Tauseef, reducing the target and bringing the crowd to its feet.

    Tensions ran high, but Tauseef had been in similar situation just 11 months ago in Sharjah when he was asked to take a single off the penultimate ball to give Javed Miandad the strike which he duly did. He then witnessed Miandad’s amazing six sinking India and destroying Chetan Sharma’s career. Could he do it again? The crowd was partisan here and Tauseef was required to do more than just tap and run to the other end.

    India was inching closer. Tauseef went in, bowled a faster one, and had Binny caught behind when the score was 204. The visitors had pulled off the impossible by 16 runs. Pakistani players were hysteric, jubilant as Tauseef performed a sajda to celebrate a most improbable victory recorded in Pakistan cricket history.

    Pakistan won the Bangalore Test, and with that the series. The spin duo took nine wickets each in the match. Former captain A.H. Kardar, the man behind Pakistan’s only win in India prior to this match was in the commentary box and it is said that he couldn’t control his emotions and blurted out, ‘We have conquered the Hindus.’

    Despite their heroics, it were not Tauseef or Iqbal but Gavaskar who was named man of the match for his innings which failed to save India.

    Published in Dawn, March 20th, 2017

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1321552/1987-bangalore-test-a-win-to-savour
     
  24. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    On this day, October 4, Shahid Afridi smashed a 37-ball-100 against Sri Lanka

    On this day in the year 1996 that Shahid Afridi arrived though he had made his debut a match before this one on October 2.

    Afridi, in only his 2nd match of his career, blasted 100 runs off just 27 balls, announcing his major arrival at the big stage. Pakistan, batting first, enjoyed the placid track on offer as openers Saeed Anwar and Saleem Elahi made a mockery of the Si Lankan bowling.

    The first wicket fell in form of Elahi and Pakistan management tried an experiment which proved to be a game changer for the team. The pair of Anwar and Afridi put on 126 runs for the third wicket. Afridi scored 102 runs of those 126 runs Saeed Anwar just watched the young man take the centre stage and smash Sri Lankan bowlers all over the park.



    His innings involved 6 fours and 11 sixes. Afridi became a sensation in world cricket after this knock. Mind you, these runs were scored against a bowling line-up that comprised of Muttiah Muralitharan and Chaminda Vaas.

    https://www.sportswallah.com/cricke...fridi-smashed-a-37-ball-100-against-sri-lanka
     
  25. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    When Misbah Ul Haq Slammed 56-ball Ton

    Misbah Ul Haq is regarded as one of the greatest cricketers ever to play for Pakistan. The former skipper was also one of the greatest leaders the country had ever seen in the longest format of the game.
    Misbah also set new milestones with the bat in Test cricket but none greater than the innings he slammed against the mighty Aussies in Abu Dhabi in 2014. On this day, three years ago, Misbah slammed the then join fastest century in format's history in the second and final Test of the series.

    Batting first, Pakistan posted a huge score of 570/6d, riding on a double ton from Yonuis Khan and centuries from Azhar Ali and Misbah Ul Haq. Imran Khan then starred with the ball as he scalped three wicket to bundle out the visitors for 261.

    Pakistan came out to bat again Azhar and Misbah slammed their second century each of the match. However, it was Misbah's ton which really deflated the Aussies. Misbah hit a 56-ball ton to equal legendary cricketer Viv Richard's record, which the West Indian set in 1985.

    However, this record was finally broken in 2015, when Kiwi legend Brendon McCullum blazed past the 100-run mark off just 54 deliveries against Australia at Christchurch.

    Coming back to the Abu Dhabi Test, chasing a target of 603, Australia were dismissed for just 246 in their second innings, losing the match by a massive margin of 346 runs. And in doing so, Pakistan also blanked Australia 2-0 in the series.

    http://www.news18.com/cricketnext/n...isbah-ul-haq-slammed-56-ball-ton-1565179.html
     
  27. chandtara
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    On this day: Cricket prodigy Waqar Younis made magical Test debut against India

    KARACHI: November 15, 1989 was the historic day on which cricket legend Waqar Younis made his staggering Test debut in Pak v India Test match held at National Stadium, Karachi.

    Regarded as one of the greatest bowlers of all times, Waqar dismissed Sachin Tendulkar on 15 runs off 24 balls with great ease, the latter debuting for the same Test from the opponent’s side, who went on to become another cricket legend in history.

    Boasting a career record of 87 Tests and 262 One Day International (ODI) matches played for Pakistan during his international cricket career from 1989 to 2003, Waqar Younis established himself as a force to be reckoned with. Taking 373 Test wickets and 416 One Day International wickets, Waqar together with bowling partner Wasim Akram, formed one of the world's most formidable bowling attacks.

    Waqar, famously known as someone who really put reverse into his swing, aside from having a glorious athletic career as fast bowler, also rendered services as the coach of Pakistani cricket team on 3rd March, 2010. He worked as bowling coach with the national side from 2006 to 2007.

    Discovered by Imran Khan, Waqar terms his selection for debut match as a surreal, life-changing experience for him.

    "Imran watched me on TV, and actually came to the ground to watch the end of the game. The very next day, he met me and told me that I will be going to Sharjah next month. Just meeting Imran at the time was enough of an experience for me, but for him to notify me of my selection was just out of this world," shared Waqar.

    Swiftly sending Sachin Tendulkar and Kapil Dev back to the pavilion with his inexorable bowling techniques; Waqar alone took 4 wickets in the match that marked the beginning of an era for the phenomenal fast bowler.

    https://www.thenews.com.pk/latest/2...-Younis-made-magical-Test-debut-against-India
     
  28. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    100.2MPH! ⚡#OnThisDay in 2003, Shoaib Akhtar bowled the fastest ball in recorded history against England at the @cricketworldcup!
     
  29. Fireworks11
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    Fireworks11 Sultan of Swing

    Sep 22, 2012
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    I wish that clattered Knight’s stumps. Would have been more iconic.
     
  30. Mohammed Bilal
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    Mohammed Bilal Talented

    Jul 17, 2017
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    Played it so well.
     
  31. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    5th Test, Pakistan tour of India at Bengaluru, Mar 13-17 1987

    INDIA v PAKISTAN 1986-87

    Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/...stan-5th-Test-pakistan-tour-of-india-1986-87/

    Pakistan won by 16 runs to record their first series win in India, their seventh Test win against India, and only their third victory in any series outside Pakistan. The behaviour of the pitch, so encouraging to spin bowling, provided a match of riveting theatre, although both captains had anticipated seaming conditions: India had included Binny for Gopal Sharma and Pakistan preferred Saleem Jaffer to Qadir. Miandad and Tauseef were again fit.

    Batting first after winning the toss, Pakistan responded to panic induced by the turning ball with extravagant strokeplay that was not so much bold as foolish. Maninder, despite mixing the bad with the good, returned career-best figures of seven of 27, including a spell of four wickets in thirteen balls. Pakistan tumbled to their lowest score against India. The home side, in turn, were made to struggle, but Vengsarkar attained the right level of aggression, hitting a six and seven fours, to place India in a splendid position at 119 for four. His first misjudgment in lofting the ball opened the way for Pakistan's counter-attack. On a wicket getting worse by the hour, the Indian batsmen followed the example of their Pakistani counterparts and a lead of 29 was all that eventuated. Iqbal Qasim, who had joined the touring party in February and Tauseef split the spoils.

    The lead was erased by Imran's shrewd move in sending Miandad out to open with Ramiz, but Kapil was not so astute in keeping Maninder on when it became apparent that he was not bowling as effectively as he had in the first innings.

    India's cause was not helped when they lost Srikkanth and Amarnanth to successive balls and Vengsarkar was bowled on the eve of the rest day. But on the fourth day, on a pitch which allowed even an off-spinner to bowl bouncers, Gavaskar gave a masterly exhibition of technique and judgement. Only when he was out, having batted 5 hours 23 minutes and faced 266 balls for his 96, caught at slip off a ball that kicked off a good length, could Pakistan assume victory. A late chancey charge by Binney cut the margin to 16, leaving India to consider what might have been had Kapil Dev and Shastri been able to resist the rush of blood that cost them their wickets.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/153101.html
     
  32. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    4th ODI, Pakistan tour of New Zealand at Auckland, Mar 13 1994

    Match Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/...4th-odi-pakistan-tour-of-new-zealand-1993-94/

    At Auckland, March 13. Tied. Toss: Pakistan.

    Superbly hostile bowling by Waqar Younis, added to unnecessary risk-taking by the middle order, salvaged a tie for Pakistan, the first ever involving New Zealand. The swinging yorker with which Waqar bowled Young in his opening burst and the fast break-back which skittled Hart were especially memorable. When De Groen was given out lbw, after setting out for what he hoped would be the winning leg-bye, Waqar had six for 30 and New Zealand's last six had gone for 19. Earlier, no Pakistani batsman had managed a major innings. Larsen's four wickets confirmed the effectiveness of his variable medium-slow pace when the ball is not coming on to the bat.

    Man of the Match: Waqar Younis.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/151038.html
     
  33. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Tracer Bullet

    Dec 26, 2011
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    Great days!!
     
  34. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    Early memories of Waqar, great spell of bowling. Loved the kit too.
     
  35. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Tracer Bullet

    Dec 26, 2011
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    Here are highlights

     
  36. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    2nd Test, Sri Lanka tour of Pakistan at Faisalabad, Mar 14-19 1982

    Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/...-2nd-Test-sri-lanka-tour-of-pakistan-1981-82/

    Each side made two changes, Pakistan including Mohsin Khan, now available, for Mansoor Akhtar and Ashraf Ali for the injured Salim Yousuf. Sri Lanka played Ranasinghe and Kaluperuma for Warnapura (injured) and Ratnayeke, Mendis taking over the captaincy. Sri Lanka won the toss and, batting first on a grassless pitch, made a good start, with makeshift opener Goonatillake staying until nearly lunch-time before being caught at gully. This was Pakistan's only success on the first day as Wettimuny and Dias took the score to 270 for one. Wettimuny reached Sri Lanka's first Test century with a sweep to the boundary off Tauseef Ahmed, but was dropped when 109 in the gully and 111 at long-leg, both off Iqbal Qasim. He scored most of his runs behind the wicket on the leg side, whereas Dias excelled with his off-driving. Both were out early on the second day, having added 217 in four hours, Wettimuny hitting 21 4s and Dias fifteen 4s.

    Sri Lanka lost three more wickets before lunch, Iqbal Qasim taking his 100th Test wicket when he had Ranasinghe caught at silly-point. Apart from D. S. de Silva, Madugalle could find little support and was left with 91 not out, including fifteen 4s, the last three wickets having fallen for 8 runs to Rizwan-uz-Zaman's gentle spin.

    Pakistan soon lost Mohsin Khan, skying a hook to second slip, on the second evening; and, apart from a dour innings of three and a half hours from Rizwan-uz-Zaman, none of the main batsmen stayed for long. However, Ashraf Ali, in his first Test, was severe on the spinners and had reached his fifty before bad light ended play 30 minutes early. When he was out next morning, 35 were still needed to avoid the follow-on, but Tauseef Ahmed and Rashid Khan proved equal to the task.

    Sri Lanka's second innings was held together by a determined innings from Goonatillake, who stood firm for nearly three and a half hours while wickets fell at regular intervals. He was finally eighth out at 114, and the declaration came after 30 minutes on the last morning, setting Pakistan to make 339 in approximately four and a half hours. The match was proceeding quietly to a draw until D. S. de Silva took three wickets in an over which spanned the tea interval, and dismissed Javed Miandad, who completed 3,000 Test runs, in the fourth of the last twenty overs. However, Ashraf Ali and Tahir Naqqash made sure that there would not be a dramatic victory for Sri Lanka.

    The overall attendance, approximately 40,000, was a considerable improvement over the first Test.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/152266.html
     
  37. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    1st Test, Pakistan tour of Zimbabwe at Bulawayo, Mar 14-18 1998

    Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/...an-1st-Test-pakistan-in-zimbabwe-test-series/

    At Queens Sports Club, Bulawayo, March 14, 15, 16, 17, 18. Drawn. Toss: Zimbabwe. Test debuts: T. N. Madondo, D. P. Viljoen.

    When play finally began after lunch on the first day, under cloudy skies following rain, conditions for swing were ideal. Zimbabwe nevertheless elected to bat, in the hope that the pitch would deteriorate and turn later. In the event, it did neither. Waqar Younis, with out-swing, and Azhar Mahmood, with in-swing, were a difficult proposition early on, but Pakistan badly missed Wasim Akram who was ruled out by fever along with Mushtaq Ahmed. Zimbabwe lost three quick wickets before the Flower brothers restored some order with an excellent stand of 77.

    The second day dawned clearer and batting was much easier. Unable to gain any swing, either traditional or reverse, the Pakistanis needed more than 57 overs to take the last five wickets. Streak, equalling his Test best, partnered Grant Flower in a crucial seventh-wicket stand of 109. Flower became the second Zimbabwean after Mark Dekker, at Rawalpindi in 1993-94, to carry his bat, in an outstanding innings, notable for its driving and watertight defence. He gave only one chance in 512 minutes and 329 balls - when 145 - and hit 13 fours and two sixes. Nearly all the Pakistanis got starts, but only the gritty Yousuf Youhana went on to reach fifty, a maiden one in his second Test. Most of the rest were out to careless or ill-disciplined shots against tight bowling on one side of the wicket.

    Zimbabwe were armed with their fifth first-innings lead in nine Tests against Pakistan, but they again started badly, losing four wickets for 25 to Waqar and Shoaib Akhtar, who was startlingly fast. But Waqar was soon forced off through injury and, when Saqlain Mushtaq was also injured, Pakistan were left with only two specialist bowlers. This, the excellence of the pitch and the hot weather assisted Goodwin and Andy Flower in building a splendid unbroken partnership of 277 in 68 overs, an all-wicket record for Zimbabwe- overtaking the 269 between Andy and Grant Flower, also against Pakistan, three years earlier. Goodwin reached his maiden Test hundred in 161 balls and then hammered 63 off his next 43, as Zimbabwe sought quick runs for a declaration. His cutting was impressive, as was his use of feet to the spinners. Goodwin hit 17 fours and four sixes; Flower's more measured century contained only six fours.

    Left with 105 overs to survive - or an improbable 368 to win - Pakistan were reduced to 80 for four on the final day, thanks to more poor batting. But Youhana and Moin Khan saved the match. They added 110 before the new ball accounted for Youhana, who had batted nearly three hours. Moin batted half an hour longer, but threw away the chance of a fourth Test hundred when he top-edged a sweep off Viljoen, who was bowling left-arm spin into the rough. Surprisingly, Campbell had declined to use his second spinner, Andy Whittall, until after tea; equally surprisingly, he granted Pakistan the draw when 45 balls still remained, with four wickets standing.

    Man of the Match: G. W. Flower.

    Close of play: First day, Zimbabwe 151-5 ( G. W. Glower 69*, T. N. Madondo 11*); Second day, Pakistan 77-1 ( Ali Naqvi 24*, Ijaz Ahmed, sen. 16*); Third day, Zimbabwe 15-2 ( G. W. Flower 4*); Fourth day, Pakistan 24-0 ( Ali Naqvi 7*, Saqlain Mushtaq 6*).

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/153374.html
     
  38. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

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    33rd Match, Group A (D/N), ICC Cricket World Cup at Kandy, Mar 14 2011

    Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/...mbabwe-33rd-match,-group-a-world-cup-2010-11/

    [​IMG]
    Umar Gul trapped Regis Chakabva lbw Associated Press

    Pakistan made the most of Elton Chigumbura's generous offer to bat first to secure a seven-wicket victory in a rain-reduced fixture at Pallekele and rubber-stamp their quarter-final place. The dank skies delivered two huge downpours that meant Duckworth-Lewis made its first appearance of the tournament in another one-sided Group A fixture.

    With the damp pitch and heavy cloud cover Pallekele resembled an early-spring Headingley and Pakistan's bowlers thrived in the helpful conditions. They entered the game on the back of a 110-run hammering on the same ground by New Zealand, but rediscovered their focus to reduce Zimbabwe to 157 for 7 when a second rain delay brought a premature end to the innings. Asad Shafiq then helped himself to an unbeaten 78 in his first World Cup match to steer Pakistan to an easy victory.

    Shoaib Akhtar was dropped after his shambolic showing in the previous match and, having struggled for new-ball scalps through the tournament, the opening pair of Umar Gul and Abdul Razzaq made three inroads in the first six overs which set the tone for the remainder of the day.

    Razzaq, who was flogged for 49 in four overs against New Zealand, landed the key blow in the first over when he had Brendan Taylor caught behind for 5. Taylor would be forgiven for thinking himself unlucky because it was Pakistan's calamitous wicketkeeper Kamran Akmal who held chance. Kamran had put down an almost identical one off Ross Taylor last Tuesday but here, to the palpable relief of all his team-mates, he made no mistake.

    If that was impressive enough, Misbah-ul-Haq's catch at slip to remove Vusi Sibanda, demonstrated a rare sharpness in the field as he moved swiftly to his right to pluck the sharp chance out the air. With the ball darting around and Gul generating good pace it looked as though Zimbabwe would subside swiftly, but Craig Ervine resisted with a gutsy half-century, finding support from Greg Lamb and later Chigumbura, who made his second-highest score in 19 matches as captain with an unbeaten 32.

    Ervine was the most assured of the Zimbabwe players but was gifted a life on 13 when Misbah undid his earlier good work by fluffing a simple chance off Razzaq. The dark clouds had threatened all afternoon and finally let rip in the 28th over with a tropical downpour. On most grounds it would have been enough to end proceedings for the day, but a collection of huge covers and an army of groundstaff combined to get the entire outfield protected and play resumed after 90 minutes.

    The delay freshened up an already sprightly surface and Ervine fell five balls after completing his fifty. It left Chigumbura to try and atone for his earlier decision to bat and he was looking in good order when rain returned to close the innings prematurely, setting a modest target of 162 from 38 overs.

    Pakistan laboured somewhat early on in a straightforward chase before Shafiq took control. Ahmed Shehzad's miserable tournament continued when he ran past a flighted Ray Price delivery to fall for 8. He now has a highest score of 13 from five knocks this World Cup which, after starring in Pakistan's 3-2 series victory in New Zealand that preceded the tournament, is a major disappointment.

    Instead it was his Mohammad Hafeez who steadied the early innings with 49. After Hafeez fell, Shahid Afridi promoted himself up the order but his search for batting form continued as he landed a couple of sweeps before missing a cut to give an ecstatic Price his second wicket

    Shafiq, in the side head of Umar Akmal, began very quietly and had 5 from 26 deliveries before finding the boundary for the first time. He added 41 from his next 49 balls to bring up a composed half-century and ensure no alarms.

    After Afridi's predictable blow-out Younis Khan partnered Shafiq to guide Pakistan over the line and into the quarter-finals with a 54-run stand. It means Group A's qualifiers are settled and the ICC can only be thankful Group B has been exciting enough to keep the elongated opening phase interesting

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/8039/report/433589/undefined
     
  39. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    2nd Test: New Zealand v Pakistan at Christchurch, 15-19 Mar 2001

    Scorecard - http://static.espncricinfo.com/db/A...2001_LIVE_MR/PAK_NZ_T2_15-19MAR2001_DAY5.html

    At Christchurch, March 15, 16, 17, 18, 19. Drawn. Toss: Pakistan. Test debut: C. J. Drum.

    The First Test may have ended in a dramatic climax, but the Second was a forgettable fizzer, fading to a dawdling draw, in a stadium that was mostly empty throughout. It was the first draw between these countries since a run-fest at Auckland in 1988-89, when 1,118 runs were scored for 18 wickets. This match, played like the First Test on a placid portable pitch that offered precious little to seam or spin bowlers, produced 1,243 runs for 19. At least it gave the New Zealand batsmen a chance to rediscover some form. They had survived the Eden Park disaster unscathed - off-spinner Bradburn and seamer Chris Drum replaced their equivalents, Wiseman and Franklin, in the bowling line-up - while Pakistan strengthened their own batting by bringing back Inzamam-ul-Haq and Ijaz Ahmed. Mushtaq Ahmed's leg-spin gave way to the pace of Fazl-e-Akbar.

    Put in, Richardson and Bell completed the century stand they narrowly missed the previous Sunday. Then Sinclair took centre stage, and rekindled expectations often disappointed since his 214 on debut against West Indies 15 months earlier. He made a gritty 204 in 520 minutes and 348 balls, striking 27 fours and reaching his double-hundred with a second six just before losing his final partner seven overs after tea on the second day. Previously, only Glenn Turner had scored two double-centuries for New Zealand. Sinclair's was their highest score against Pakistan, beating Martin Crowe's 174 at Wellington 12 years earlier.

    Pakistan gave no indication of forcing the pace. They defended their series lead by batting New Zealand out of the game, establishing a 95-run lead after 14 hours of occupation. Inzamam, back from injury, accepted a life on ten to run up 130, while Yousuf Youhana compiled a maiden first-class double-hundred and, finally, Saqlain Mushtaq added a maiden century. Youhana batted a little longer than Sinclair - 528 minutes - but had considerably more of the strike with 429 balls, from which he hit 27 fours and three sixes. He and Saqlain put on 248 in 95 overs for the seventh wicket; Saqlain batted throughout the fourth day to progress from 20 overnight to 98 not out.

    The final day meandered aimlessly like a silent brook. Saqlain took nearly 30 minutes to complete his century - he batted seven hours ten minutes in all - whereupon Pakistan finally declared. New Zealand never looked like repeating their collapse of the First Test and batted out 73 overs to reach 196 for one, with unbeaten fifties for Richardson and man of the match Sinclair. The final session, when Moin Khan had left the field with a bad knee, leaving Inzamam in charge, brought some frivolity with the introduction of occasional bowlers Youhana and Faisal Iqbal, along with the even more occasional off-spin of Waqar Younis. Both sides agreed to come off 40 minutes early.

    Man of the Match: M. S. Sinclair.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/154122.html
     
  40. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    35,319
    33rd Match, Benson & Hedges World Cup at Perth, Mar 15 1992

    Scorecard - http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/...an-vs-sri-lanka-33rd-match-world-cup-1991-92/

    At Perth, March 15. Pakistan won by four wickets. Toss: Sri Lanka. After their promising start, Sri Lanka ended the tournament as the lowest-placed of the Test nations, while Pakistan's regeneration continued. Once more, however, they were profligate with wides and no-balls, and De Silva added 51 in ten overs with Samarasekera. The innings lost momentum without them, and 213 seemed within Pakistan's reach.

    In a nervous start Aamir Sohail was caught in the second over, and Imran took nearly an hour over two runs. At the halfway mark they were 84 for three. But the chase was given momentum by Javed Miandad and Salim Malik, who added 101 in 21 overs for the fourth wicket. When Miandad left, the target was down to 28 from six overs, and in the end Pakistan had five balls to spare.

    Man of the Match: Javed Miandad. Attendance: 3,071.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/story/150897.html
     

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