Pay $23 million or lose 2023 World Cup: ICC to BCCI

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  1. Savak
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    Savak Emerging Player

    Feb 26, 2013
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    Pay $23 million or lose 2023 World Cup: ICC to BCCI

    K Shriniwas Rao | TNN | Updated: Dec 22, 2018, 08:39 IST

    ICC has asked the BCCI to cough up roughly Rs 160 crore before Dec 31 to compensate for tax deductions incurred in hosting the 2016 World T20 in India.
    India did not get a waiver from the central or state ministry for the tournament
    The ICC is headed by former BCCI president Shashank Manohar

    MUMBAI: The International Cricket Council (ICC) has put the proverbial gun to the head of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), asking it to cough up US $23 million (roughly Rs 160 crore) before December 31 to compensate for the tax deductions incurred in hosting the 2016 World T20 in India.

    The game’s global governing body, which is headed by former BCCI president Shashank Manohar, expects BCCI to compensate them for the tax deductions when India hosted the tournament two years ago and did not get a waiver from the central or state ministry. BCCI has been reminded of this demand, mentioned in the minutes of ICC’s board meeting in Singapore in October.

    The Indian board, now governed by the Supreme Court-appointed Committee of Administrators, has less than 10 days left to comply with the ICC’s demand. The international body has threatened that should BCCI fail to do the needful, it will deduct that amount from India’s revenue share for current financial year.

    The ICC has also threatened that should India fail to comply, the governing body will look at “other options” to host the 2021 Champions Trophy and the 2023 50-over World Cup, which are scheduled to be played in India.

    Star TV, the official broadcast rights holder of all ICC tournaments, had deducted all taxes before paying the global body for the World T20 played in 2016, and the latter now wants the BCCI to compensate for it.

    The BCCI, in turn, has asked the ICC to share the minutes of any meeting where it is recorded that India had agreed to tax waiver. “The ICC hasn’t provided any minutes to the BCCI yet,” sources in the know told TOI.

    The BCCI was headed by former president N Srinivasan then and at no point, say those in the know, did the Chennai-based administrator tell the ICC that BCCI would compensate them for tax deductions should they not receive a waiver from the government.

    “And now, the ICC is shying away from sharing any minutes because they don’t have any. They just want to recover that money from India,” sources said. There are indications that this bickering over tax-related matters is only an extension of the acrimony that ICC’s present independent chairman and Srinivasan have shared over a period of time. “Time and again, Shashank has targeted BCCI for his own personal agenda,” say members.

    The board, nevertheless, is convinced that should ICC fail to share the minutes, no payment will be made and should the ICC deduct the money from India’s revenue, legal recourse will be sought. “It’s become fashionable to blame BCCI,” said a board member.

    “Biting the hand that feeds, eh? Is that what it has come down to? A sports body that has economic value primarily because it feeds on India’s commercial stake in the game is telling India that it cannot host a World Cup? And that too with an Indian heading that organisation right now? What a joke,” said a senior BCCI member.

    Link: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/67202484.cms

    Comments: Lol, Indians making fun of the PCB reimbursement of legal and tribunal fees to the ICC and BCCI, i wonder why did no one highlight this gem. Atleast the PCB does not have to pay $23 million to anyone.
     
  2. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Tracer Bullet

    Dec 26, 2011
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    Empty threats. Nothing will come of it.
     
  3. Wistful Reminisces
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    Wistful Reminisces Banned

    Sep 21, 2012
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    BCCI can afford 23 million, unlike penniless PCB
     
  4. ShokoTolo_LoloMoto
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    ShokoTolo_LoloMoto Emerging Player

    Apr 16, 2010
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    They don't have the heart and dare, to pay that much.
    So the ability to afford paying money is not enough.
     
  5. godzilla
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    godzilla Talented

    May 12, 2016
    2,487
    no way will the ICC get a penny out of their masters.
     
  6. pat
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    pat Youngsta Beauty

    Nov 25, 2018
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    Is this a new demand by ICC? Is there a signed deal in place between ICC and BCCI?

    I doubt BCCI is in any mood to deal with new nonsense from ICC. By, that time spineless CoA will be out and BCCI will be out for blood. If ICC doesn this w/o proper legal cover, they will be up S$%t creek without a paddle.
     
  7. godzilla
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    godzilla Talented

    May 12, 2016
    2,487
    this is totally consistent with the BCCis policy of 'this is not the gentleman's game' policy, first it was some bizarre self interested and penny pinching stance on DRS which of course they U turned on, and now its legal bickering against the spirit of the game.

    with MOUs its 'we are beheld by the government of India' so couldn't have signed an MOU, it was just a letter of intent. neither side made it clear legally, but its obvious that that was agreement.

    now, its 'we are totally independent of the indian government, so the split should be after whatever they take, has nothing to do with us', when its clear that every board will have to pay taxes out of their share, not pre-share. again, may not have been legally coded because its obvious, but not for the BCCI if they can get away with some money.

    what a bunch of filthy, immoral scum, destroying the entire sport world wide thanks to spineless administrators everywhere else.
     
  8. pat
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    pat Youngsta Beauty

    Nov 25, 2018
    220
    1) When has it ever been a gentleman's game? till the 80's it was Eng and Aus dictating who can play. In the early 90's it was PCB throwing its weight around after winning the world cup by cancelling tour over flimsy reasons. After it was trying control Indian crickets marketing and now it is rip indian cricket of as much as possible. Atleast India has made the game commerically viable around the world.

    2) no it was never clear it was an agreement? Think logically and listen to zaka. He asked for guarantee, didn't get it and as a man of integrity, he didn't sign

    Let set the record straight PCB did not support Big 3. they abstained in Feb 2014. Their vote in April 2014 was as useful as a used sanitary napkin and in return they got a Paper which was just as useful. It was Sethi being too clever thinking that BCCI was weak and though he could exploit them with a biding non-appealable arbitration. Too bad the DRC members had integrity.

    3) Tax breaks are not always a given. Who on earth thinks $23M tax break a a given and formality. Only stupid people

    If a board and country which supports cricket around the world is filthy immoral scum and what does it make countries like Pak, SL, Ban? the poop of that immoral filthy scum or eat the poop of that filthy immoral scum to survive?

    Would love to see ICC take a stance and boycott BCCI. May be Pak can lead the way, if they have the balls for it
     
  9. godzilla
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    godzilla Talented

    May 12, 2016
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    the bcci are filthy, money pinching scum. its not worth denying it. thats not to say all other boards are awesome. they are pretty much all shitty in different ways, but the bcci is the mother of poop, like an old filthy tramp sitting on top of a rubbish heap, sucking diarrhoea out of an old sock kind of filth.
     
  10. pat
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    pat Youngsta Beauty

    Nov 25, 2018
    220
    The 2012 tour of 3 ODI's? Those were played in India. There was nothing to hand over. Maybae PCB should stop being so desparate?

    Do you have any evidence for this? PCB did not even have the guts to vote no. they abstained. PCB playing hardball? There is a laugh.

    Your theatrics aside, do you have any evidence that tax break is a given/formality? any at all? I'm happy to listen.

    1) BCCI had plenty of money before IPL
    2) what does it make Pakistanis who can't stop begging to get invited to play in IPL? Do you want me list the begging episodes?

    here is the lates PCB head

    "I want to sit down with my counterpart at the BCCI and see if I can improve that relationship," he adds. "But the complications go far beyond cricket and will require changes in thinking. I'd like to see Pakistan players welcomed into the IPL, though. That would be a big step."

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_...kistan-was-overwhelming-new-pcb-md-wasim-khan


    BCCI is protecting its own money, generated from india. If that pisses a country like Pakistan and its fans off. too bad.
     
  11. BuccalSingh
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    BuccalSingh Youngsta Beauty

    Mar 21, 2016
    272
    Its not about what they can afford dummy, otherwise this wouldn't have been a news in the first place.
     
  12. pat
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    pat Youngsta Beauty

    Nov 25, 2018
    220
    https://www.indiatoday.in/sports/cr...for-world-cup-2023-icc-ceo-1443527-2019-01-31

    India in no danger of losing hosting rights for World Cup 2023: ICC CEO

    ndia are not in danger of losing the hosting rights of the 2021 Champions Trophy and 2023 World Cup despite tax exemption issues, the International Cricket Council (ICC) CEO David Richardson declared Thursday, ending speculation that has swirled around the two events.

    The Indian government refused to give tax exemptions to the ICC when the country hosted the 2016 World T20 following which the game's governing body asked the BCCI to either pay USD 23 million (Rs 161 crore) as compensation or lose the 2023 World Cup rights.


    "Getting tax exemptions is very important for world cricket because every cent that is made by the ICC revenue wise is put back into the game. This helps countries like the West Indies who don't generate as much revenue," said Richardson at an event to announce a five-year partnership with Coco-Cola.

    "But having said that there are no plans of taking away the hosting (from India) and I'm sure we will get it (exemption) in the end, we've still got a lot of time," he added.

    The schedule for the 2020 T20 World Cup was announced earlier this week and India and Pakistan won't meet in the group stages for the first time since 2011.

    Richardson explained that the groups were decided on the basis of rankings and there was no credible way for the two neighbouring nations to meet before the semifinals.

    "We have arranged the groups in a way that has credibility and is based on the ranking system. The teams are placed according to their ranks. In this case, Pakistan were number one in the rankings in their group and India number two," Richardson said.

    "...we found no credible way of putting them in the same group. Hopefully from a world perspective they will meet each other in the semifinals or final."

    One of the serious problems the ICC is facing is the ever-increasing threat of corruption in the game, Richardson said the ICC's Anti-Corruption Unit (ACU) is pro-actively working to curb the menace.

    "It's not just about anti-corruption but also about player conduct. In recent times, we have had several unruly incidents around the world and we have taken really firm steps there to make sure that everybody understands we need to protect the spirit of cricket."

    "We have taken a more proactive approach to disrupt the actions of certain frivolous individuals that wander around trying to fix cricket matches. We continuously are trying to disrupt them as much as possible and the players are doing the right thing by reporting any incident."

    Richardson, who will step down after the World Cup in July, was asked about the highs and lows of his time in office, the South African said convincing India to use DRS was a memorable achievement for him.

    "Some things took a little longer than we'd like to implement. One of them was to convince India that DRS was a good thing. It probably took so long because in the first trial that we conducted, all the decisions seemed to go against India. So we had to convince Anil Kumble that it could work," he said.
     

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