Positive Pakistan

Discussion in 'The Pavilion' started by Saul Goodman, Apr 14, 2012.

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  1. karachigirl
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    Sep 6, 2011
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    ISLAMABAD: ​
    Mountaineer siblings Samina Baig and Mirza Ali have successfully scaled Mount Denali in Alaska in the US, said audio messages they have posted on [COLOR=#666699][FONT=inherit]the website Alpine Ascents[/FONT][/COLOR], the company facilitating the expedition on June 29.

    Samina and Mirza from Pakistan, Ankur Bahi from India and two alpine guides, Ben Jones and Peter Moore, successfully reached the top of the 6,168-metre Mount McKinley, or native name Denali, the highest mountain peak in North America. This is the third most prominent peak after Mount Everest and Aconcagua. Located in the Alaska Range in the interior of US state of Alaska, McKinley is the centrepiece of Denali National Park and Preserve.
    On March 19, they had conquered Carstensz Pyramid in New Guinea Island in the Indonesian province of Papua, which is on the Australian continental shelf. The 4,884-metre high mountain is also known as Puncak Jaya.
    They are now only one peak away from completing their ‘Seven Summits’ goal, which they have dedicated to women’s empowerment, gender equality and environmental conservation.
    Their last attempt will be on Mount Elbrus in Russia next month, said Mehboob Ali, elder brother of the climbers.
    If they scale each continent’s highest mountain, they will become the only siblings in the world to have achieved this feat.
    The Adventure Diplomacy Group consisting of the Serena chain of hotels and the embassies of Argentina, Indonesia, Nepal, Russia and the US, was set up to provide logistical and diplomatic support to the duo’s Seven Summits campaign. Their expedition is financially supported by a Pakistani-Canadian philanthropist, an American woman and a group of New Zealanders.
    The mountaineering duo had earlier climbed Mount Vinson in Antarctica in January, Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa in February and Mount Aconcagua in Argentina in December last year.
    Samina Baig climbed the world’s tallest mountain Mount Everest on May 19 last year, becoming the first Pakistani woman to accomplish this task.
    Denali is the sixth peak the brother-sister duo from Gilgit-Baltistan’s Shimshal valley has climbed since they started their expedition in November 2013 in their quest to climb the highest mountains on each of the seven continents.
    The first verifiable ascent to McKinley’s summit was achieved on June 7, 1913 by climbers Hudson Stuck, Harry Karstens, Walter Harper, and Robert Tatum, who went by the South Summit. On September 11, 2013, Alaska’s lieutenant governor Mead Treadwell announced Mount McKinley is 6,168-metre tall and not 6,194 meters as measured in 1952 using photogrammetry.
    The Koyukon Athabaskan people who inhabit the area around the mountain referred to the peak as Dinale or Denali (the high one or the great one, respectively).
     
  2. karachigirl
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    When a fire broke out last week at a Capuchin friary in Karachi, Pakistan's largest city, both local Christians and Muslims rushed to put out the blaze.

    On July 16, a fire began at Karachi's “Capuchin House” around 11:00 a.m. People in the neighborhood heard a huge blast, and then saw a raging fire engulf the residences of the friary.

    “We thank God that no lives have been lost and the friars are safe,” Asif Nazir, a local teacher, told EWTN News July 21.

    “Only a assistant parish priest, Fr. Javed Kashif, sustained burn injuries on his hands while trying to extinguish the fire.”

    Nazir explained that the lack of casualties was because “the friars were in the city on their missionary assignments, and the rest of the staff were on summer vacations.”

    He added that it has been confirmed that the fire was caused by an an electrical short circuit.

    “The Muslim neighbors rushed for help in extinguishing the fire, which brings a ray of hope for dialogue, communal harmony, and sustaining peace,” Nazir reflected.

    He lamented that the friary's “precious books, documentation file folders, and electronics such as computers” have all “turned into ashes.”

    “The quantified assessment of actual damage is under process,” he added.

    The friars have asked for prayers, support and encouragement as they work to restore their home.

    At the time of the fire, Fr. Qaiser Feroze was on a pastoral visit to the Agha Khan Hospital, while Fr. Javed Kashif and Fr. Bernard Younas were at St. Philip’s parish.

    The Capuchin Franciscans are among the 11 religious priests in the Archdiocese of Karachi, who serve alongside the local Church's 26 diocesan priests. Together, they serve some 166,000 Catholics, who constitute just over one percent of the area's total population.

    The archdiocese does works of charity, serving the youth and women with education, and health and social development. Both Christians and Muslims are served by the 14 archdiocesan high schools.

    Pakistan's population is about 97 percent Muslim, with Hindus and Christians each constituting nearly two percent of the total population.
     
  3. Victorious Pakistan
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    Feb 29, 2012
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    [​IMG]

    Asif Patel’s hands seem to work naturally on the car engine, his affiliation to the pistons and valves in front of him a little deeper than the others around him.

    As he feels around for wires, Patel tilts his head sideways and closer to the engine almost as if it’s speaking to him. Finally, the right wires come in contact, a spark follows and the engine roars to life. The wily car mechanic simply smiles. But for those standing close by, this is nothing short of a ‘miracle’. Patel never ceases to amaze, even though he has been doing the exact same thing for over 10 years.
    Blind by birth, the 43-year-old owns an auto repair shop in Lasbela and is no less than a hero in his locality.
    Patel was only 15 when he started experimenting with his father’s car and later, bought his own Fiat. The car did not last in its original state for long; Patel hand-picked the parts from the Sunday bazar at New Karachi and revamped it according to his taste.
    He, along with his successful musician brother, who is also blind, never felt a sense of loss at this disability and both have turned around their lives despite struggling at first in a society where disabilities have never been fully accommodated.

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    As a child, he had a habit of breaking toys, appliances and once even pulled down a ceiling fan to ‘study’ the mechanics of it.
    It was his passion for cars, however, that put him on track for the cult-like following that he now enjoys and paved the way for his very own workshop.
    What kick started his business was an odd request from a friend.

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    [​IMG]
    Patel installed an automatic gear in it and boosted the engine. The car got a new lease of life and was the only such FX in the area and perhaps in the city.
    From then onwards, his talent caught the eyes of neighbours and friends. In no time, his house was surrounded by a dozen cars waiting to be fixed. Showroom owners would give him unregistered cars to install or change engines when needed. He would diagnose the fault by testing the brakes, starting the car, checking the suspension, relying dominantly on the varying sounds.
    “People who have been born blind refine their sensation of sound and touch by making use of the visual parts of their brain,” Dr Saira Farhan, a physician at a local clinic, says.
    It is perhaps this ability of Patel which makes him a wonder in his area.
    With his growing experience with handling cars, Patel opened his own workshop in Soldier Bazaar on rent with a team of twelve, this too was gifted to him by mere luck.
    Muhammad Asif who has been working at the shop for over 10 years says working for Patel has been a rewarding experience and would not trade it for anything.
    “We have never been treated as workers here. Everybody contributes in this business like it's our own,” Asif says.

    [​IMG]

    But six years in, the successful business hit a bit of a downturn after Patel was forced to shift his shop from Soldier Bazaar to Lasbela.
    “My landlords asked me to move as they wanted to build a hospital, I shifted my workshop to Lasbela with half of my team but my business has not been the same,” said Patel reminiscing of the time his shop would be packed with cars.
    “The hospital was never constructed either.”
    Despite the downslide, the spirits at the Patel workshop are high and the eagerness to learn is still there. The team is currently exploring hybrid cars and working on Electronic Feul Injection (EFI) systems, another marvel considering that most of the employees are learning on the job.
    Apart from Patel’s expertise in cars, he is tech-savvy as well and can be found on Facebook and WhatsApp, which he manages himself.
    “I do not see myself as a victim; I have earned respect through my work. Words are not enough, practicality is everything,” Asif says, his gleaming with satisfaction.

    Text by
    Yumna Rafi
    Photography
    Yumna Rafi
    Producers
    Shameen Khan
    Taimur Sikander

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1128322/a-life-less-ordinary

    Amazing..

    iAd karachigirl Desi_Joker Express Pace ehtesham Stan1 WaQaReD! ComradeVenom ElRaja ..
     
  4. karachigirl
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    Sep 6, 2011
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    @Victorius Pakistan
    I saw this article this morning on Dawn.
    Just goes to show that when there's a will, there's a way.
    Meanwhile, us able-bodied folks make up all the excuses we can and play victim whenever we can, instead of even bothering to stand up for change.
    This man (and others like him) are role models for us all.
     
  5. karachigirl
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  6. karachigirl
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    GILGIT:
    Famous motorcyclist and social activist Mukarram Khan Tareen kicked-off his 10-day country-wide tour on Thursday. The tour is a tribute to the 10 army soldiers awarded with the highest military award, Nishan-e-Haider.
    “This tour is an attempt to pay tribute to those soldiers who sacrificed their lives for the country,” Tareen told journalists at Gilgit Press Club.
    Tareen’s journey started from the press club and he plans to reach Karachi via Chitral, covering a distance of 3,200 kilometres. “I am doing this on my own and hopefully I will be in Karachi on September 6, Defence Day.”
    Stop and salute
    Tareen plans to make his first stopover at Shaheed Havildar Lalak Jan’s tomb to hoist the Pakistan flag in a show of respect. He will then do the same at the remaining nine graves of Shaheed Captain Sher Khan at Swabi, Shaheed Lance Naik Muhammad Mahfuz at Rawalpindi, Shaheed Captain Raja Muhammad Sarwar and Shaheed Raja Muhammad Hussain Janjua at Gojar Khan, Shaheed Major Tufail Muhammad at Vehari, Shaheed Major Aziz Bhatti at Gujrat, Shaheed Major Shabbir Sharif at Lahore, Shaheed Major Muhammad Akram at Jehlum and Shaheed Rashid Minhas at Karachi.
    “The journey will be through a difficult terrain but it is meant to express solidarity with the Pakistan Army,” said Tareen. “I am sure it will give me courage to finish the task in the given time,” said the biker who is known for his love for the open road.
    Tareen has undertaken several such expeditions. In 2011, he was part of a motorcycle tour which left for China from Multan to mark what Pakistan declared the Sino-Pak Friendship Year. Similarly, in a 13-day tour, Tareen visited 25 historical forts in Punjab.
    The cyclists explained how he also undertook travel expeditions to raise awareness about the welfare of people with disabilities and various diseases.
    “In future I plan to travel all the way to Germany. This will be for the welfare of orphans.”

    Published in The Express Tribune, August 29th, 2014.
     
  7. ComradeVenom
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    Jul 24, 2012
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    Victorious Pakistan thats the type of story that gets me out of bed when I wake up in the morning and want to phone in sick for work. Great share.
     
  8. Victorious Pakistan
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    Feb 29, 2012
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    MULTAN: Mehran Sattar, son of a fruit-seller, Iqra Khalid, daughter of an iron merchant and Kainat Zulqadar, daughter of an expatriate, clinched the first three positions in the intermediate examination.
    Mehran Sattar from KIPS College for Boys, Multan, won the overall first position by securing 1,031 marks, while Iqra Khalid from Punjab College for Girls, Khanewal, secured the second position with 1,029 marks and the third position went to Kainat Zulqadar from the City College of Science and Commerce with 1,025 marks.
    The result was announced in a ceremony at Jubilee Hall of the Board of Intermediate and Secondary Education (BISE) on Friday.
    In Arts Group, Muhammad Tariq, a private candidate, stood first by securing 901 marks, while Muhammad Ayub Khan, another private student, bagged the second position by getting 891 marks and the third position went to Youail Yousuf from the Govt Emerson College, Multan, who got 886 marks. All top positions went to private colleges like the last year.
    According to the gazette notification, 53,751 candidates appeared in the FA/FSc examination this year, of them 28,804 passed.
    Provincial Minster for Prisons Chaudhry Abdul Waheed Arain praised the position holders, their parents, teachers and colleges for their brilliant performance.
    He disbursed cash prizes, medals and other prizes among the position holders. Acting BISE Chairman Prof Arshad Awan and Controller Prof Haider Abbas also spoke.
    Toppers’ aim: Top position holders of the intermediate examinations urged the students to pay respect to their parents and teachers and work diligently for bringing laurels in their lives.
    Talking to this news agency, Mehran Sattar, who grabbed the first position, said he always paid respect to his parents and teachers. He said he wished to be aeronautical engineer in the future.
    Youngest in the family of six, Mehran said there was always room for improvement. He, however, added he was satisfied with the existing education system.The second position holder with 1,029 marks, Iqra Khalid, said she wanted to be neurosurgeon in the future.
    She added she used to spend nine hours on studies daily and she was expecting a position in the examination.
    Daughter of an iron merchant, Iqra said that her achievement was owing to Allah's favours, teachers’ dedication and parents’ prayers.
    Third position holder Kainat Zulqadar said that she was against cramming to pass the examinations.
    She added that students did not have clear concepts of any topic and therefore felt difficulties in MCAT. She wanted to do research work after doing MBBS because country was lacking in this field, she said.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1131631/fruit-sellers-son-tops-in-multan
    --
    Mash'Allah. Very well done. Wish them all the best and utmost success in life and their careers.
     
  9. karachigirl
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    When you meet Shahzadi Gillani and Rizwana Zafar — two strong female police officers from Khyber Pakhunkhwa — you can’t help but smile.
    Shahzadi grew up on army bases across Pakistan. Her father served in the forces and from an early age she wanted to follow in his footsteps. “I had this burning desire to serve my country,” she says. She tried very hard to get inducted into the army, but women were only serving as doctors or nurses at the time and she was unsuccessful. “I wanted to be on the frontlines, I wanted to be part of the action. You only live once and you should live a life that serves as an example of bravery,” she says. So instead, she joined the police force.
    Her family hesitated at first, and placed conditions on her. She could only join, if she brought along a friend. So, Shahzadi reached out to Rizwana who readily agreed.
    Rizwana grew up as the daughter of a labourer in Haripur, Punjab who played a major role in shaping her personality. He fought for labour rights and always played a ‘front and centre’ role in labour disputes. “I would watch my father work day and night, in overtime shifts to support our family and would think that I needed to be just like him; hardworking and brave.”

    Two police officers from KP defy every preconceived notion anyone may have about the capability of Pakistani women


    She answered a newspaper advertisement recruiting women for the police force and when Shahzadi reached out to her, the timing was perfect.
    After training, they went to Abottabad where Shahzadi was the SHO at the women’s police station and Rizwana served alongside her. Over the years, they attended commando courses in Punjab and served in different areas in KP including Hangu, where they trained a new batch of policewomen inducted into the force. In 2005, they returned to Abottabad and in October their police station was destroyed in the earthquake. They pitched a tent and started helping families in Balakot and surrounding areas. “We lived in a tent for two years and after that we moved into a container for the next three years. Our people lost everything and as long as they didn’t have homes, we didn’t want one,” says Shahzadi.
    Shahzadi and Rizwana’s duties vary, from serving VIPs to conducting raids and searching homes for criminals. “We are often called in to search homes,” says Rizwana. The culture in KP is such that male police officers often hesitate entering into homes in case there are women inside. “We lead from the front,” says Rizwana. “Once we enter, then the male police officers follow us. So I would say we are four steps ahead of men, because we knock on the door and enter first,” she says with a glint in her eye and wry smile.
    It is definitely not an easy job. Female police officers conduct night raids, spend years away from family, live in harsh conditions and serve long hours. Currently, some 600 women serve in the 60,000 police force in the province. “We do exactly the same duties as men do,” says Rizwana. “If our male colleagues sleep, we sleep, if they eat, we eat. We don’t ask for special privileges just because we are women.”
    Their favourite story is of a raid they conducted in a mountainous area near Abottabad. “The trek was arduous,” says Shahzadi. “We walked for hours to conduct this investigation and our male police officers accompanied us. At one point, we turned around and we couldn’t see them. Rizwana and I were perplexed, had we veered off the track? But then we looked back and saw them struggling up the hill. They did finally catch up to us.” That raid is particularly memorable to them because of the toughness they displayed.
    Rizwana recalls one dangerous raid, which they conducted in the middle of the night at a house, which harboured suspected terrorists. “It was a very cold night, and three female police officers including myself accompanied the raiding party. Once we reached the house, we were unsure how many terrorists were inside but we did know that they were armed and ready for an encounter, so I volunteered to go in first and scaled the walls,” she says.
    The police cordoned off the house while Rizwana entered. She jumped in and the terrorists started firing but she managed to open the front door and the raiding party overpowered them so they were arrested. “I am not afraid of death, we all have to die one day,” she says
    Shahzadi and Rizwana come from humble beginnings but they have a vision and a desire and they have fought to make their dreams a reality. They have served in the police force for close to 20 years now and have become examples in their family and community. Countless other young women have followed in their footsteps and joined the police force.
    To me, these women represent the best of Pakistan. I have always said, Pakistan’s biggest assets are its women. They shine bright and when you meet these two and shake hands with them you can see just why that is so true.
    To hear their story and other inspirational stories like theirs, log on to: SOC FILMS program online: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x20vdkiaghaz-e-safar-our-frontline-heroes-episode-11news
    Published in Dawn, Sunday Magazine, September 14th, 2014
     
  10. Victorious Pakistan
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    Feb 29, 2012
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    Pakistan becomes associate member of CERN lab

    [​IMG]
    Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif witnesses the signing of an agreement with CERN at the PM House in Islamabad on Friday. – APP

    GENEVA: The world's top particle physics lab has admitted Pakistan as an associate member, a year after Israel was voted in as a full member.
    Rolf Heuer, director general of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, known as CERN, says he signed a document Friday in Islamabad in the presence of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif that admits Pakistan if the government ratifies the associate membership.
    Heuer said in a statement Friday that Pakistan has been “a strong participant” in CERN research since the 1990s – and its inclusion in the lab's community serves other important purposes as well.
    “Bringing nations together in a peaceful quest for knowledge and education is one of the most important missions of CERN,” he said.

    Chairman Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC), Dr Ansar Parvez signed the agreement for CERN associate membership from Pakistani side. The signing ceremony was also witnessed by heads of local scientific organisations, foreign diplomats and many other dignitaries.
    Speaking at a press conference after the ceremony, the PAEC chairman said that associate membership of the country reflects the decades long committed efforts of Pakistani scientists and engineers contributing to the scientific research and technological work at CERN.
    Dr Parvez said Pakistan's scientific community was introduced to CERN through Dr Abdul Salam in 1960's. He said, “The experience gained by working in the world largest accelerators at CERN is helping our scientists and engineers in developing our own Linear Accelerator for medical purposes”.
    The status upgrade means nuclear-armed Pakistan will have more access and say in the research, and that it will be able to bid for contracts, but also that it must contribute more financially each year to the facility.
    Pakistan and CERN signed a cooperation agreement in 1994 through which the nation has contributed to the lab's major experiments and become involved in developing CERN's particle accelerator.
    Pakistan became a nuclear power in 1988. It routinely test-fires what it claims are indigenously developed missiles.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1151877/pakistan-becomes-associate-member-of-cern-lab
     
  11. Victorious Pakistan
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    Pakistani scientists develop DNA “barcode” to identify salt tolerant plants
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    The research is the doctorate thesis of Uzma Munir (r) under the supervision of Dr Qamarunnisa (l). — Photo by Suhail Yusuf
    KARACHI: Pakistani scientists have developed a “genetic barcode” system which could be used for accurate and quick identification of medicinally important halophytes (salt tolerant plants) across the world.
    The method can be a valuable tool for plant taxonomists to find useful halophytes. The scientists from the Dr A Q Khan Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (KIBGE) at Karachi University collected different species of genus, Suaeda or Sea Blite commonly found in Asia.
    They also gathered different samples from across Pakistan and they targeted specific chloroplast gene with the hopes of finding a similar DNA sequence to develop a potential bar code common in halophytes.
    The team examined Suaeda. fruticosa, S. monoica, S. acuminata, S. heterophylla and S. oluf species. They studied three chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) regions rbcL, matK and psbB, psbN, psbT and one nuclear DNA (nrDNA) region or Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) was tested for the identification of Suaeda species.
    To develop the barcode, the scholars studied 11 fresh and herbarium samples of five different species of Suaeda. The samples were collected from Uthal and Hub, Balochistan and five different cities of Sindh and Punjab.
    [​IMG]
    Different species of Suaeda. — Photo by Bilquees Gul

    The results showed similarity in rbcl and ITS region of plants as they were conserved or common in all species of Suaeda and declared as DNA barcode for quick identification.
    Halophytes like Suaeda grow in desert and saline areas but are often very difficult to identify as they change their appearance in response to climate and soil conditions.
    Sometimes experts are even left puzzled by two plants of the same species.
    “The plant DNA barcode has been developed for first time in Pakistan. It also showed promising results when the sequence was compared with the National Centre for Biotechnology Information databanks,” Dr. Syeda Qamarunnisa, one of the researchers at KIBGE, told Dawn.com.
    Now, the team is studying the possibility of whether the barcode can be applied to halophytes other than Suaeda.
    “The method can also be used to identify other important halophytes of different genus,” Qamarunnisa said.
    Different species of Suaeda are used as medicine, fodder, fuel and other economically benefits. For instance, Suaeda fruticosa is used in baking soda and while its tree is used for fuel. Suaeda monoica is used for ointments for wounds and in traditional medicines for hepatitis.
    In 2012, scientists from other than KIBGE noticed antibacterial, antioxidant and anti-cancerous properties in the leaves of Suaeda fruticosa, however, some other species of suaeda needs to be evaluated for healing properties.
    The research by the scientists in Pakistan is the doctorate thesis of Uzma Munir under the supervision of Dr Qamarunnisa and Dr. Anjum Parveen. In their previous work, the researchers extensively worked on medicinal properties of Suaeda.
    Dr. Bilquees Gul, the Head of the Institute of Sustainable Halophytes Utilization (ISHU) at Karachi University, agreed that identification of Suaeda was difficult and the DNA barcode developed by the scientists could play a very important role in recognising useful species of Suaeda.
    “Suaeda is a highly variable species that lives in an extremely challenging and variable environment. DNA barcoding of this plant is a very interesting subject. It can be used for clear cut identification of a species which is not generally possible by classical taxonomy.
    “Barcoding will not only help to speed up the identification process but also for phylogenetic conclusions. More work to be needs to done for application of this technique for practical purpose,” Gul told Dawn.com.
    How DNA barcoding works


    DNA barcoding is a comparatively new technique in which almost every plant or animal can be identified through matching genetic make up between species.
    The other established technique is taxonomy, a study of physical appearance to identify animals, birds and plants.
    By establishing a DNA region as a yardstick from the genome of an animals or plants, a barcode can be developed to identify other close species. It works in the same way as scanners and the black stripes on the products in super stores.
    The one good example is 648 base-pair region in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene (“CO1”) that is being used for the identification of many birds, butterflies and fish.
    The scenario is different in plants as rbcl and matK are being used as the barcode regions. However, the technique will produce more viable results if used with taxonomy.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1158482/pa...-dna-barcode-to-identify-salt-tolerant-plants

    Express Pace Don Corleone PakistanZindabad! ehtesham karachigirl Energy Fawad iAd ComradeVenom Ahson Afzal
     
  12. ehtesham
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    Sep 10, 2011
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    Someone please show this to Hassan Nissan.
     
  13. Energy
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    Apr 22, 2012
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    Hassan Nissan kon hai?
     
  14. ehtesham
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    Sep 10, 2011
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    Auto correct tera kakh na rahway
     
  15. Munna
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    Oct 4, 2014
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    Hanif Honda ka first cousin hai according to wikipedia.
     
  16. Energy
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    Apr 22, 2012
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    :rofl
     
  17. Victorious Pakistan
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    Feb 29, 2012
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    Fiza Farhan: Of powerhouse proportions
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    [Fiza Farhan, CEO of Buksh Foundation, who was on the 2015 Forbes ’30 under 30’ social entrepreneurs list. PHOTO COURTESY: MALIK SHAFI]
    Sitting behind a laptop and a pile of folders, Fiza Farhan, CEO of Buksh Foundation and director of Buksh Energy, has timed her day to the minute. In the 45 minutes allotted to the interview, the young powerhouse, who was on the Forbes’ ‘30 under 30’ social entrepreneurs list for 2015, recognises her workaholic tendencies but dismisses them by saying, “I have crazy amounts of energy now which I might not have in years down the line, so I need to make the most of it.”
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    With a graduate degree in economics from the Lahore University of Management Sciences and a masters in entrepreneurship from the Warwick Business School under her belt, Farhan began her career as a consultant and worked for several development institutions. This is also when she first began working on impact investment projects and creating models that would assure multiple gains for all the stakeholders including community members, donors, investors and even the government. In 2008, she met with Asim Buksh, chairman of Buksh Group, and helped co-found Buksh Foundation and Buksh Energy which today is responsible for lighting the lives of millions in Pakistan’s rural areas.
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    [Fiza Farhan at a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Jahengir Tareen of Lodhran Pilot Project. PHOTO: LOTUS PR]
    Farhan has always enjoyed a challenge and it was when Buksh wanted to explore untapped markets that they got involved in development and energy. “In 2009, we saw other microfinance models collapsing around us, so we went about it with a different philosophy — a sustainable one,” she says, explaining why Buksh Foundation was established as a microfinance company. Once the company goals were laid down and its objective clearly established, Farhan set about creating a sustainable enterprise instead of merely cultivating clients. This, in turn, lead to the company’s recorded less than one per cent default rate.
    In 2012, Farhan pushed the bar even higher and aimed for a project that would prioritise development in forgotten communities and settled on providing clean energy to villages and settlements that were off the grid. But she does not take complete credit for the idea; Farhan attributes it to Dr Rajendra Pachauri’s Nobel Prize-winning initiative, ‘Lighting a Billion Lives’ in India. The project’s first step involved visiting an off-the-grid village and mobilising the local community. “They need to own the project or else we scrap it,” she explains, adding that previously the government tried to implement the solar energy project in rural areas but failed in several places because the communities living there were completely disinterested. Next, a local female project representative or ‘roshna bibi’ is appointed after due assessment, including several psychological tests, and takes on the role of a change agent. She is given the responsibility to rent out solar-powered lanterns to community members at one-third or half the price of a gas-powered lantern and exchanging used lamps returned every morning with fully-charged ones. As a reward, she gets to pocket half the earnings while the remainder is deposited into an after-sales fund. The foundation also trains two local mechanics who take charge of basic repairs of the solar-powered lamp chargers.
    The project has proven to be an all-round success because of its inclusive approach. So far, it has reached out to 140 villages in the country and empowered an equal number of roshna bibis. Even the investors have been kept happy by providing personalised marketing strategies in exchange for funds. Based on unanimous support, this year Farhan also plans on expanding the foundation’s work to tap into biogas, biomass and waste-to-energy projects. “Did you know you can light up the whole of Lahore by simply using the waste it produces?” she exclaims, showcasing just how much further she plans on going.
    [​IMG]

    It is this attitude of excelling and extending benefits to everyone that has become Farhan’s mission in life. Fortunately, she realised her desire to do more than deliver sales pitches from nine to five early in her career. Hence, when Buksh Foundation offered her the opportunity to implement her ideas from scratch, she decided to make the most of it. Like every effective strategist, she calculated the odds of success and made sure to draw out backup plans. “I assure my team that if we don’t manage to execute a plan one way, we’ll try another. If you plan to succeed, you must learn to deal with failure,” she says. This is one of the reasons Farhan has no regrets about the decisions she has made thus far, she claims. “I trust my intuition and take ownership of my decisions.” Neither has she allowed her gender to be an impediment of any kind. “I have sat in countless meetings and conferences as the only woman [in the room], but it does not daunt me,” she says. “Once a woman has proven her competence, there is no stopping her.”
    While Farhan has showcased good business sense, she acknowledges that her ascend in the corporate world would have been impossible without the support of her husband and family. Her mentor Abid Bilal and accounts of other successful entrepreneurs also keep her inspired.
    Farhan also has a book in the pipeline in which she outlines her philosophy towards life and certain guiding principles that might encourage other women who aspire to enter the male-dominated corporate world. Despite all the feathers in her cap, Farhan remains humble and grounded. “I had no idea there would be so much attention and plaudits coming in from all over the world… Ask my closest friends and they would say Forbes made a mistake.”
    [​IMG]

    http://tribune.com.pk/story/825209/forbes-30-under-30-of-powerhouse-proportions/

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    Desi_Joker Fawad Energy Mercenary Ahson Afzal iAd Express Pace Don Corleone karachigirl Mycroft Holmes
     
  18. Desi_Joker
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    Desi_Joker Tracer Bullet

    Jun 18, 2012
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    Just came across this on Youtube. Felt like sharing it.

     
  19. Reverse Swing
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    Reverse Swing Talented

    Jul 30, 2013
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    The woman at 4:26. :fp

    If you can't speak English then don't speak it. And there is no need to speak English anyway.

    Nice video though.
     
  20. Desi_Joker
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    Desi_Joker Tracer Bullet

    Jun 18, 2012
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    Would you be face-palming had that been a South American woman with a heavy accent?
     
  21. Victorious Pakistan
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    Victorious Pakistan Smooth Operator

    Feb 29, 2012
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    Desi_Joker - That video reminded me of something else I came across a while ago which was quite powerful.

    From 6:50 till 7:01 is so powerful in part 1. A lot of good work people do in Pakistan tends to go unnoticed in the midst of the problems and mess. An even bigger problem is the same people who always look to find issues and problems are never there to promote the goodness within.
    If you created a thread about a bomb blast it would have a hundred comments but when you post an article with some real positive news it has barely 10...



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  22. PakistanZindabad!
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  23. Reverse Swing
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    Jul 30, 2013
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    Point is that it's a video about the positives of Pakistan, and English is definitely not one of them. Our national language is Urdu and we should speak that; especially in such a video.

    People think if you speak English then you are 'better' than everyone else. Also known as a 'wannabe'.
     
  24. Desi_Joker
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    Jun 18, 2012
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    I don't see you criticizing the people who spoke English well in the video. The video is about the positives of Pakistan, but leave it to a pessimist to pick up negativity in that too.

    I'm sure she is proud of her national language and speaks perfect Urdu. What makes you believe that she doesn't out of those 3 seconds?

    That last line is just for those with an inferiority complex.
     
  25. Reverse Swing
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    If she was so proud of her national language then she wouldn't be speaking English in a video which is meant to make you proud of your country.

    And the fact that she can't speak English is another matter. And I don't just have a problem with her, I've seen it happen a lot over the years and I've always disliked it, but the fact that she said droomas made her more noticeable.

    But if she was told to speak in English by those who were making the video, then I blame them.
     
  26. Desi_Joker
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    That's a great video Victorious Pakistan . It's a shame not more people know about such things.

    Sabina Khatri is a hero in my eyes. Not only is she changing the lives of kids in a very positive manner, but she is also aiming to improve the general knowledge and education level in a community on which most people have given up hope. It's absolutely brilliant to see how genuine her intentions and love for the kids and the community is.

    Take a bow, Sabina Khatri.
     
  27. Desi_Joker
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    Desi_Joker Tracer Bullet

    Jun 18, 2012
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    What do you think about the video posted in the post after mine by Victorious Pakistan?

    Is she wrong in teaching them English. Should she just stick to teaching them urdu because national pride and whatnot?

    Let's be honest, trying to bring someone else down because they said "droomas" instead of "dramas" is quite pathetic. You got her message, she communicated what she wanted to say... that's what's important, not whether she had perfect grammar and/or pronunciation.
     
  28. Passionate Pakistani
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    Passionate Pakistani The Don

    Jun 10, 2011
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    I agree with Desi_Joker I come across so many europeans who cant speak proper english, so many athletes and managers from europe who speak in funny accent but no one dare to make fun of them or criticise them but when someone from us speaks in awkward accent or pronunces words in wrong way then our very own will start laughing at them.

    Especially how it is here in UK where people are called Freshies, Tep, Mangos etc just because they aren't as fluent or have different accent.
     
  29. Reverse Swing
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    A Pakistani speaking in English doesn't make me proud of my country. Speaking Urdu, or any Pakistani language does.

    Fact is, she probably has an inferiority complex and so do a lot of Pakistanis when it comes to English.

    And there is a difference in 'teaching English' and 'speaking in English when you really should be speaking Urdu'.

    I think you're overreacting to be honest. I just gave my opinion that you shouldn't be speaking English in that video, let alone when you can't actually speak it.
     
  30. SwingNSeam
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    Sep 12, 2010
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    Positive Pakistan thread yet there is argument here. :clap
     
  31. Reverse Swing
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    Jul 30, 2013
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    I'm critising her speaking English. The fact that she is speaking bad English is another matter.

    And the example you have given is incorrect, because those Europeans are living in the UK, where you have to speak English. In Pakistan, or especially in that video, you don't.
     
  32. Reverse Swing
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    I didn't start it. :shrug
     
  33. Reverse Swing
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    Reverse Swing Talented

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    Anyway, nice song by Ali Zafar.

     
  34. Victorious Pakistan
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    Feb 29, 2012
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    Dream big: Teenage student wins third place at Intel science fair

    893362-HabibIdreesPhotoPRcopy-1432746549-110-640x480.jpg
    [Habab Idress shows off his solar-powered thermostat device at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Pittsburg. PHOTO: EXPRESS]

    PITTSBURG:
    A student from Karachi has secured third place at the world’s largest pre-college science fair, competing against 1,700 young scientists from across the globe.


    Habab Idrees was one of eight Pakistani students who presented their science projects at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Isef) 2015, held in Pittsburgh, United States, from May 10 to May 15. He earned third place in the ‘Energy: Physical’ category for his project of a solar-powered multipurpose thermostat device.

    [​IMG]

    The teenage boy, a resident of Korangi, had developed a device to find an energy-saving, cost-effective way to maintain the temperature for things, such as water tanks, amid changes in weather. “With this device, we can achieve many things — controlling the temperature of water, drying fruit, distilling water and increasing biogas production,” he explained, adding that he wanted to help the poor through his invention, which he says was inspired by a lotus plant.

    “I remember the moment when they called out my city and country — I was so proud,” he recalled, jubilant at winning third place and prize money of $1,000. “It feels amazing to be one of the best young inventors of the world.”

    Ahead of his win, Idrees, who dreams of becoming one of Pakistan’s top scientists someday, claimed, “Winning is not everything but it will feel great if I can get Pakistan’s name on the board.” He qualified for Isef after winning the National Science Competition organised by Intel Pakistan in February.

    Along with him, three students from Lahore, two others from Karachi, one from Vehari and one from Khairpur were also selected to present their projects at Isef. One of them, Muhammad Ahsan Nawaz, had been nominated for the science fair for the second time.

    “The Intel Science Fair was amazing — it recognised our hard work and gave us the opportunity to present our projects,” said Ali Khan from Karachi.

    The only girl among the eight Pakistani students, Kiran Karim, also from Karachi, agreed with him. “Isef is the best, most innovative platform for creating and nurturing scientific thought,” she believed.

    “While it is a great opportunity to promote science, it is also wonderful for meeting new, like-minded people,” added Shadab Rasool from Vehari. “I made a lot of friends and even taught them how to perform bhangra!”

    The Isef brought together young scientific minds from 64 countries, showcasing their talent on an international stage. Their projects were judged by doctoral-level scientists, allowing them to compete for over $3 million in prizes and scholarships.

    The Intel ISEF unites these top young scientific minds, showcasing their talent on an international stage, enabling them to submit their work to judging by doctoral level scientists-and providing the opportunity to compete for over $3 million in prizes and scholarships.
    Published in The Express Tribune, May 28th, 2015.

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    http://tribune.com.pk/story/893362/dream-big-teenage-student-wins-third-place-at-intel-science-fair/
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    @Energy @Don Corleone @Desi_Joker @PakistanZindabad! @ComradeVenom @iAd @Ahson Afzal @SwingNSeam @dashing_man @Wistful Reminisces
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2015
  35. Victorious Pakistan
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    How 3D prosthetics change lives in Pakistan

    KARACHI: Two weeks ago, Shabana moved her hand for the first time since her accident.

    Where there were once amputated fingers, she now has a new, albeit bulky hand made of synthetic material. Designed to her body's measurements, and with no electronic elements, Shabana's artificial hand is among the first 3D printed prosthetics in Pakistan.

    The project began with an unlikely meeting: Dr Hassan Zahid had recently moved back from Syria when he ran into his neighbour, Rabi Imran, a 22-year-old working as an engineer at the time.

    As the two got talking, the doctor told him about his travels abroad, where he witnessed the devastation of amputee children first-hand, and seen the toll it can take on human life.

    Concerned for those who get critically injured during war, Dr Hassan mentioned the need for affordable prosthetics in Pakistan, and other war-torn regions. He believed amputees should be reintegrated into society, and suggested that the advent of 3D printing technology could make this a reality sooner rather than later.
    [​IMG]
    A 3D printed prosthetic hand. —Photo courtesy Grit 3D


    It took months of deliberation before Rabi began working on the project full-time. But once it was decided, there was no looking back.

    Rabi gathered a team and began approaching various hospitals and medical professionals with his idea. He explained how 3D-printed prosthetics could prove to be a breakthrough for Pakistan’s disabled community. Meanwhile, he dipped into e-NABLE, the global open source 3D printing community, to plan his process.

    He approached Asad Jabbar, and together, the two entrepreneurs officially founded Grit 3D. The two pitched their idea to The Nest i/o startup incubator, and were accepted.

    Over the next few months, the incubator provided the ambitious team with mentors, technical guidance, and resources to move forward. But in order to make their idea a reality, and to build a successful case study for their mission, Grit 3D needed candidates who could try out the first few prosthetic hands.

    That’s where Shabana came in. A young woman from Ghotki in rural Sindh, Shabana met with an unfortunate accident while she was preparing fodder for cattle. Her left hand was caught in a chaff cutter machine, and was almost completely severed. Rabi’s team found her while working with Dr Nabila Soomro at Dow University of Health Sciences.

    On April 12, after months of planning, designing, and printing, Grit 3D installed its first 3D-printed prosthetic hand.
    [​IMG]
    A 3D-printed logo. —Photo courtesy Grit 3D


    Within a few weeks, Shabana will be able to start stitching and sewing again. The Grit 3D team has planned an extensive rehabilitation process for her, to help her adapt to her newly acquired hand's functionality. Although each individual finger of the hand cannot be moved, the prosthetic allows a person to handle most day-to-day tasks.

    Grit 3D is planning to develop more advanced prosthetics, such as those which allow amputees to move each individual finger using electronic signals linked to muscles. Because 3D printing technology costs are falling, the team is hopeful it will be able to explore lower limb prosthetics as well.

    Although there is no pricing model yet, their aim is for it to be purchased by hospitals and given to patients free of charge. But the most important part is bringing hospitals on board. The start up is in talks with various facilities across the country to familiarise them with its mission: providing reliable and affordable prosthetics to amputees.

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    www.dawn.com/news/1254750/how-3d-prosthetics-change-lives-in-pakistan
     

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