Sandpaper Gate - Steve Smith and David Warner banned for 1 year, Bancroft 9 months from all cricket

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  1. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Smith, Warner banned from IPL 2018

    The already beleaguered Australian pair of Steven Smith and David Warner, the country's captain and vice-captain until the recent ball-tampering saga unfolded, have been banned from participating in IPL 2018 with immediate effect, BCCI confirmed through a media release, on Wednesday (March 28).

    The decision was made by the Supreme Court-appointed Committee of Administrators, in consultation with the BCCI Acting President CK Khanna, IPL Chairman Rajeev Shukla and BCCI Acting Hon. Secretary Amitabh Choudhary. While the latest decision leaves a huge vacuum in both the Royals' and Sunrisers' camp, the Indian cricket board has allowed the franchises to bring in replacements for the duo.

    "The BCCI hopes that the cricketers participating in the IPL hold the highest regard for the Spirit of Cricket and Code of Conduct for Players and Match Officials," the release read further.

    Both players, captains of their respective franchises, had already stepped down from their positions as leaders of the side. Both Smith and Warner were on contracts of 12.5 crore INR - the highest paid Australian players in the tournament.

    The fall-out from Smith's astounding ball tampering confessions midway through Australia's third Test against South Africa has snowballed rapidly. The barring from the IPL now has come on the back of reports that both Smith and Warner have been handed one-year bans from Cricket Australia, an official announcement of which is expected at 12.30 PM Johannesburg time, i.e 4 PM IST

    http://www.cricbuzz.com/cricket-new...a-srh-rr-sunrisers-hyderabad-rajasthan-royals
     
  2. MR__KHAN__JI
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    MR__KHAN__JI Talented

    Sep 5, 2010
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    Apparently it was sandpaper.

    Sent from my SM-N915A using Tapatalk
     
  3. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    ICC fails to take stern action against Australian players for cheating

    LAHORE: When Pakistan trio – Salman Butt, Mohammad Asif and Mohammad Amir – committed spot-fixing in 2010 in England during the Lord’s Test, the consequences were disastrous not only for these best players of the contemporary sport but also for Pakistan cricket. Though their misdeed and dishonesty did not affect the result of the match but they did face lengthy bans, served jail terms and remained as outcasts for a very long time. But it seems what happened in Cape Town – ball-tampering – during the recently concluded Test between Australia and South Africa is a lesser offence, and, above all, the players involved in an attempt to influence the result of the Test are of ‘superior race’. The punishment of a one-match ban for Australian captain Steve Smith, and three demerit points for Cameron Bancroft, who was caught on camera trying to tamper with the ball, is, no doubt, inadequate and outlandish.

    This unfair punishment has shown all and sundry – despite big talk of equality – that sports are also divided on racial lines. The justice system for whites is something else and for Asians, well, the criteria is entirely different. To be precise, more damning. In 2010, all cricket playing nations condemned the trio in particular and Pakistan cricket in general. There were talks of morality, ethics and professional honesty. Now with involvement of white players in ‘calculated cheating’, the International Cricket Council (ICC) has shown its soft corner towards the guilty. Isn’t this double standards? Shame on the ICC!

    The ICC has clearly missed a big opportunity to show leadership over the Australian ball tampering controversy. The world governing body has had two players who have admitted guilt for cheating, and it should have taken a stern action just like in 2010. The ICC should have set the example. The ICC itself has ruined the ‘spirit of the game’. The ICC is responsible as it is the stakeholder. The ICC has clearly taken the George Orwell’s ‘Animal Farm’ route: “some cricketers are equal but some are more equal than others”.

    Being labelled a cheat is the worst name one can get in sport. It’s not necessarily the captain’s job to be popular, but it is his job to ensure his side are playing within the spirit of the game. The position of Australian cricket captain is even locally referred to as the second most important position behind the Prime Minister. The Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), the sole authority on the laws of cricket since it was founded in 1787, called for better leadership across the global game. “The time has come for a major shift in attitude and culture of all those with responsibility for leadership within the game, to give young players the kind of role models who will uphold standards, preserve cricket and, vitally, the Spirit of Cricket for future generations,” John Stephenson, MCC Assistant Secretary (Cricket), said in a statement.

    Australia have messed up spectacularly; their actions cannot be condoned. There has to be a punishment that deters and it feels like the side’s chief executive, James Sutherland, is in a mood to deliver one. The ball-tampering scandal that has engulfed the country has made Australia’s major cricket sponsors, including Qantas Airways, breakfast cereal maker Sanitarium and brewer Lion, to assess their relationship with the country’s favourite pastime as the fallout from a ball-tampering scandal escalates. The incident, which Australian captain Smith said involved senior players hatching a plan to tamper with the ball, also threatens to upset current negotiations over broadcast rights.

    The sport’s past heroes, including the late Sir Donald Bradman, are revered for their conduct as much as their victories, helping create a clean, attractive brand to attract corporate sponsors. But the ‘leadership group’ of the current Australia team has ruined the concept of playing “hard, but fair” that has always been integral to their national identity.

    https://dailytimes.com.pk/220690/wh...tion-against-australian-players-for-cheating/
     
  4. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    How Fanie de Villiers dismantled Australia two decades after retiring

    Twenty-four years ago Fanie de Villiers dismantled an Australian cricket team with a sensational spell of swing bowling. Now he has emerged as one of the key figures in exposing the current Australian side as ball tamperers.

    In January 1994, an inexperienced South African team, on their first tour of Australia after two decades of political isolation, faced almost certain defeat when Australia needed just 116 runs to win the second Test in Sydney.

    Playing in just his second Test, De Villiers took six for 43 and bowled South Africa to an improbable five-run victory in a match in which they had been forced to follow on and in which Shane Warne had taken 12 wickets for Australia.

    Twenty-four years later De Villiers was at Newlands as a television commentator, trying to understand how the Australians were able to get reverse swing on a grassy field with a ball which was still relatively new.

    De Villiers told Australian radio station RSN927 that he had tipped off the camera crew that caught Cameron Bancroft rubbing the ball with a piece of yellow tape which the batsman then tried to conceal.

    “We actually said to our cameramen: 'Go out. Have a look, boys. They are using something.' It's impossible for the ball to get altered like that on a cricket wicket where we knew there is a grass covering on. It's not a Pakistani wicket where there are cracks every centimetre.

    “I said earlier that if they could get reverse swing in the 26th, 27th, 28th over, then they are doing something different from what everyone else does.”

    According to De Villiers, it took the cameramen an hour and a half of searching before they caught Bancroft in the act.

    Bancroft admitted he panicked when he saw close-up images of himself on the big screen, leading him to try to conceal the tape in his underwear, an image shown around the cricketing world and reproduced on websites and numerous newspapers.

    “I was nervous about it because with hundreds of cameras around that's always the risk,” Bancroft said when he admitted to using the tape to rub against the ball.

    It was only a slight exaggeration. SuperSport television producer Alvin Naicker said that 30 cameras were at the ground, with seven instructed to follow the ball at all times, even when it was out of play.

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1397865/h...smantled-australia-two-decades-after-retiring
     
  5. godzilla
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    godzilla Smooth Operator

    May 12, 2016
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    seems a bit light to me, although kudos to the AC for acting beyond the ridiculous code of the ICC and so quickly. Compare that to the pathetic, unprofessional and incompetent behaviour of the PCB seven years ago.
     
  6. godzilla
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    godzilla Smooth Operator

    May 12, 2016
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    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_...vid-warner-banned-12-months-cricket-australia

    "Warner is banned from captaincy for life, and Smith for 12 months after the completion of his ban. Cameron Bancroft, the player caught tampering with the ball, was banned from playing for nine months and from captaincy for 12 months after the completion of his ban.

    CA has said that the plan was devised by Warner, the foreign object used was sandpaper, and that Bancroft and Smith lied publicly in their post-match press conference in referring to it as adhesive tape."

    ...

    " It is hoped that following a period of suspension, the players will be able to return to playing the game they love and eventually rebuild their careers."

    While banned from international and first-class cricket, Smith, Warner and Bancroft are all permitted to play club cricket for the period of their bans "to maintain links with the cricket community""


    that sounds very soft to me, allowed to "maintain links with the cricket community" after publicly LYING to the press and the umpires? how are they left with any integrity to still maintain links? they will be able to return to the game they eventually love??

    this bs should have a zero tolerance policy as should fixing, not some half baked, half measure with reference to rehabilitation and compassion. They knew exactly what they were doing, they lied and misled people in public. theres no going back from that in a fair world.
     
  7. iho
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    iho Smooth Operator

    Aug 7, 2010
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    I dont think he will ever lead Australia again.
     
  8. Del
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    Del Cornered Tiger

    Dec 21, 2016
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    Hey bro, good to see your post. Hope you will continue to do so.
     
  9. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Warner apologises for 'stain on the game'

    David Warner, identified by Cricket Australia as a central figure in the ball-tampering scandal, has issued his first public statement since the events of the Cape Town Test, apologising for "the distress he has caused the sport and its fans".

    "To cricket fans in Australia and all over the world: I am currently on my way to Sydney. Mistakes have been made which have damaged cricket," Warner said via a statement on Twitter. "I apologise for my part and take responsibility for it. I understand the distress this has caused to the sport and its fans. It's a stain on the game we all love and I have loved since I was a boy. I need to take a deep breath and spend time with my family, friends and trusted advisors. You will hear from me in a few days."

    On Thursday, Warner was banned from international and domestic cricket by CA for 12 months and was also been barred from assuming any kind of leadership position in Australian cricket in the future. His IPL contract was also cancelled for the 2018 season and his personal endorsement deals have taken a hit with electronics brand LG and kit manufacturer ASICS severing ties.

    These were the fallout of the ball-tampering incident that took place on Saturday during the third Test against South Africa at Newlands. Television cameras had caught Cameron Bancroft rubbing a foreign substance on the rough side of the ball - the opposite side which a player usually shines. The coach Darren Lehmann then sent out a message through 12th man Peter Handscomb, following which Bancroft shoved a yellow object down his trousers, prompting scrutiny from the match officials.

    At the post-day press conference, Bancroft and the captain Steven Smith admitted to ball-tampering with sticky tape in an effort to generate reverse swing and said "the leadership group" had known about the plan beforehand. After an investigation into the matter by CA's head of integrity, Iain Roy, Warner, who was vice-captain at the time, was charged with "development of a plan to attempt to artificially alter the condition of the ball and instruction to a junior player to carry out a plan to take steps to attempt to artificially alter the condition of the ball using sandpaper."

    A day before the findings of the investigation came to light, there were reports that the Australian players wanted Warner out of the team and that the CA management was equally keen to see the back of him.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/22949159/david-warner-apologises-stain-game
     
  10. Fireworks11
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    Fireworks11 Kaptaan

    Sep 22, 2012
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    People really going OTT now. Smith was nearly being physically abused as he made his way through Johannesburg airport. Bloody hell, he’s not a rapist/serial killer, he’s made a mistake, admitted to it, punished heavily. Move on now.
     
  11. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Hashim Amla responds to bans imposed on Australia’s ball-tampering trio

    JOHANNESBURG: South African batsman Hashim Amla on Wednesday said that the controversy over ball tampering in the third Test against Australia “gives every team in the world a reality check”.

    Amla was responding to the bans imposed on Australia’s Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft.

    He said that the events of Cape Town should lead cricketers to ask: “What kind of cricket do you want to play? It has probably given the ICC a lot more headaches and the opportunity now is for the governing bodies to show us, where is this line?”

    He was referring to frequent comments by Australian cricketers about the limits of acceptable behavior and “not crossing the line”.

    Amla said South Africa’s focus, ahead of Friday’s fourth and final Test, was on preparing to clinch a Test series which they lead 2-1.

    “With all the distractions, there is not much we can do from our perspective,” he said.

    “I am grateful that we are sitting in the South African change room without the shadows hanging over us. For us, it is about the cricket. You’ve got to keep your focus as professional sportsmen.”

    https://arynews.tv/en/ball-tampering-incident-a-reality-check-amla/
     
  12. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Smith, Warner’s punishment greater than their crime: Warne

    SYDNEY: Former Australia skipper Shane Warne branded reaction to the Australian ball-tampering scandal a “tornado of hysteria” on Wednesday and said the punishments meted out to Steve Smith and David Warner do not fit the crime. Captain Smith and vice-captain Warner have been banned from representing their country for a year over the cheating incident during the third Test in South Africa, while opening batsman Cameron Bancroft has been suspended for nine months. “We are all so hurt and angry and maybe we weren’t so sure how to react,” Warne wrote on Facebook. “We’d just never seen it before. “But the jump to hysteria is something that has elevated the offence beyond what they actually did, and maybe we’re at a point where the punishment just might not fit the crime.”

    The former leg-spinner – second on the overall list of Test wicket-takers – said Australia’s enemies had taken the opportunity to put the boot in. “There are those countries that don’t like Australia, don’t like individuals in the team, and there has been a build-up of hate which has exploded and created this tornado of hysteria,” he wrote. “But what are the players guilty of? Cheating via ball-tampering and bringing the game into disrepute. Their opposing captain in this series, South Africa’s Faf du Plessis, has been charged with the offence twice and opening bowler Vernon Philander once. The list of players who have been charged with ball-tampering is long and contains some of the biggest names in the game.” Warne also questioned the idea of pre-meditated cheating. “Are there levels of ball tampering, or is it just ball tampering? Is putting a mint in your pocket so you can shine a ball on the field pre-meditated cheating, or just ball-tampering. What about putting sunscreen on the ball? You either ball tamper or you don’t.” Warne said Smith, the top-ranked Test batsman in the world, was guilty of a “severe error of judgement”. “I am still trying to wrestle with what I think the punishment should be,” he said. “They have to be harsh, but if they are rubbed out for a year, the punishment does not fit the crime.”

    https://dailytimes.com.pk/220928/smith-warners-punishment-greater-than-their-crime-warne/
     
  13. MNA
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    MNA Smooth Operator

    Mar 11, 2015
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    One year ban, two years for leadership role, seems a little harsh to me. There have been cricketers convicted of ball tempering who never came out clean, never admitted to it and still got away much more lenient fines. Good on Smith to actually maned up to it, had he not, only Bencroft would have been convicted, and a leacher like Warner would have gotten away unscathed.
     
  14. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Pakistan cricket coach slams ‘boorish’ Australia players

    SYDNEY: Former coach Mickey Arthur Thursday slammed Australia’s players as “boorish and arrogant” and accused them and governing body Cricket Australia of being unwilling to improve the culture within the game.

    The South African, the first foreigner to hold the post, was sacked on the eve of the Ashes series in 2013 and replaced by current coach Darren Lehmann.

    Now coaching Pakistan, he said the ball-tampering scandal in South Africa, which saw captain Steve Smith and vice-captain David Warner banned from all international and domestic cricket for 12 months, was the culmination of years of inaction.

    “Despite generational change, independent reviews and too many behavioural spot fires to list, Cricket Australia and the national team had demonstrated no real willingness or desire to improve the culture within their organisation from season to season,” he wrote on www.playersvoice.com.au.

    “I have been bitterly disappointed watching the Australian cricket team over the last few years. The behaviour has been boorish and arrogant.

    “The way they’ve gone about their business hasn’t been good, and it hasn’t been good for a while,” he added to the website, where sportspeople can air their views.

    Arthur, who was the national coach from 2011-2013, said he had tried to change the culture within Australian cricket but was not able to.

    The 49-year-old added that he was not blameless and there were decisions he had made during his time that he would change.

    Arthur’s tenure was marked by the so-called “homeworkgate”, when four players were banned for one Test for failing to complete a written task set during a disastrous tour of India in 2013.

    Arthur said when he was in charge, he found the cricketers “were a law unto themselves” and the homework affair was a “microcosm of a problem that remains with the Australian team to this day: the sense of entitlement among the players”.

    He welcomed the sanctions against Smith, Warner and Cameron Bancroft, who was banned for nine months, saying Cricket Australia “needed to make a stand”.

    “Australian cricket has been in an ivory tower for too long. They had to take decisive action. If they didn’t, things would inevitably return to the way they had been and another major incident would’ve been inevitable,” he added.

    Lehmann, whose long-term future as coach is in doubt amid a Cricket Australia-commissioned independent review into “the conduct and culture” of the team, told reporters in Johannesburg that Australia needed to change its approach.

    “The thing for me would be if we take a leaf out of someone like say New Zealand’s book, the way they play and respect the opposition,” the Australian said. -AFP

    https://www.samaa.tv/sports/2018/03/pakistan-cricket-coach-slams-boorish-australia-players/
     
  15. Mohsin
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    Mohsin Cornered Tiger

    Feb 21, 2010
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    4:39 :(

    The guy is obviously older than me but still seems like a kid wanting a hug from his parents. He clearly feels genuinely bad over what happened.

    Should obviously have been punished but the punishment should have fitted the crime. If there are worries over 'stamping out' ball tampering, then change the law and put in place in clear, strong punishment so its there for all to see/anyone knows the serious consequences if they try something and get caught.
     
  16. Munna
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  17. ASLI-PATHAN
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    ASLI-PATHAN Cricistan Khan

    Apr 26, 2011
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  18. godzilla
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    godzilla Smooth Operator

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    I don’t care particularly for this sympathy. Smith is hurting because of the pain to his parents and to his career. If they weren’t affected presumably he wouldn’t be as sorry?

    It’s not about being human and ‘just making a mistake’. Perhaps everyone does make mistakes, well everyone pays for those mistakes too.

    It’s almost as of attention is starting to shift from a team famous for its underhanded tactics, hypocritical moralising, public goading (‘send him back in tears’, ‘end careers’) and out and out Shameless and brazen cheating should now be sympathised with because they are ‘emotional’.

    It’s a total disgrace and they deserve everything they are getting. Hearing they made a mistake is a plea for leniency. I don’t want to hear a plea for leniency, I want to hear a genuine apology for what they did.
     
  19. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Whispering Death

    Dec 26, 2011
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    Man this is hard to watch.
     
  20. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Whispering Death

    Dec 26, 2011
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    BREAKING NEWS: Darren Lehman resigns
     
  21. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    One headline after another coming out of this. It makes a change being another team in the middle of this rather than ours!
     
  22. Munna
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    Darren Lehmann has resigned as head coach of Australia's men's team.

    The fourth Test at the Wanderers will be his last Test in charge.

    “Saying goodbye to the players was the toughest thing I’ve ever had to do,” he said.

    When asked his proudest achievement as head coach, Lehman was concise, and pointed.

    “I would say the way we dealt with Philip Hughes’s passing," he said. “We’re only playing a game.”

    Lehmann was installed as head coach just weeks out from the 2013 Ashes series in England after CA sacked South African Mickey Arthur, who oversaw the 'homeworkgate' affair in India, which led to four players being suspended.

    While Australia lost the 2013 Ashes series 3-0, players said Lehmann had reunited a fractured group while simultaneously bringing enjoyment back to the Baggy Green, after the squad's culture had disintegrated under Arthur's watch.

    Throughout that Ashes, the new mentor actually banned the word 'culture' as he looked to reinvigorate the set-up, recalling young batting gun Steve Smith and handing teenager Ashton Agar a shock debut in the opening Test as he looked ahead to a new era.

    Five months later, Lehmann's side regained the Ashes with a spectacular five-nil whitewash off the back of an inspired Mitchell Johnson, who repaid the faith of Lehmann and selectors by returning to Test cricket with 37 wickets to utterly dismantle a shocked England squad.

    Lehmann played his part in another significant selection call in South Africa following the Ashes whitewash, when he dropped veteran seamer Peter Siddle for Victorian teammate James Pattinson for the deciding Test in Cape Town, which Australia won in dramatic fashion late on day five to wrest the world No.1 Test ranking from the Proteas.

    A failed World T20 campaign and a two-nil hammering at the hands of Pakistan in the UAE were afterthoughts when Lehmann, his charges and the broader cricket world were rocked by the tragic passing of Phillip Hughes in November 2014.

    A galvanised unit returned to Test cricket 12 days after Hughes's death, winning an emotional match in Adelaide before going on to defeat India 2-0.

    Australia relinquished the 2015 Ashes under Lehmann's watch – continuing an away drought that extends back to 2001 – before a dominant run against New Zealand and West Indies was quickly overshadowed by another away defeat; this time a 0-3 loss to a lowly-rated Sri Lanka outfit.

    The Australians' losing streak went to five matches when they surrendered a home series to South Africa, with a devastating result in Hobart – in which the hosts were bowled out for 85 – precipitating mass changes.

    Australia then won at home to Pakistan before losing a hard-fought series in India 2-1 – a respectable result against Virat Kohli's team given their recent results on the subcontinent – then drew one-all in Bangladesh last September.

    A 4-0 Ashes success this summer has been followed by chaos and controversy in South Africa, which has seen his players banned, fined, abused by the local crowds, which will be Lehmann’s last campaign behind the wheel.

    https://www.cricket.com.au/news/dar...-head-coach-ball-tampering-scandal/2018-03-29
     
  23. godzilla
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    godzilla Smooth Operator

    May 12, 2016
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    Lehmann has done the right thing.

    whatever everyones views on what has happened and why it happened, and what the aftermath should be in terms of censure, one thing is certain - that the Aussies have handled the problem very professionally. they have done exactly what they should be doing to give themselves the best chance of shaking themselves free of this whole episode.

    compare that to the Pakistani set up back in 2010.
     
  24. godzilla
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    godzilla Smooth Operator

    May 12, 2016
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    Just watched Lehman's press conference, I dont buy it at all. the main thrust of it again was his family. CA have come out saying that they are about to start an enquiry into the culture of the team, I reckon he was on his way out anyway.

    its quite astonishing: the aussie public anger versus the Pakistani public support for corruption and cheats, the aussie press crucifying the culprits versus the Pakistani press screaming conspiracy, the immediate admission of guilt of the Aussies versus the slimy, back handed forced whispers from the Pakistani trio, the Aussie captain standing up and wearing the responsibility versus butt bare faced lying and hiding for years, and the aussie board doing everything they can create a path back, versus the extremes of puerile unprofessionalism and third world moral bankruptcy of the Pakistani board.
     
  25. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Many former players took to social media to give their thoughts:

    [​IMG]
    Former fast bowler Mitchell Johnson commented on the situation on Twitter
    [​IMG]
    BBC commentator and former England captain Michael Vaughan showed sympathy for the Australian players
    [​IMG]
    Smith's predecessor as captain, Michael Clarke, offered a one-word verdict
     
  26. Munna
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  27. Munna
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  28. Mohammed Bilal
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    Mohammed Bilal Tracer Bullet

    Jul 17, 2017
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    I hope Smith can recover from this incident.

    People make mistakes, hopefully the people close to him make him feel better.

    It was rather sad watching a great player shed tears.
     
  29. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Whispering Death

    Dec 26, 2011
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    Can’t help but feel sorry for Smith & Bancroft. CA punishment is OTT but it is what it is. Hopefully they will recover from this saga.
     
  30. Jeetu
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    Jeetu Youngsta Beauty

    Feb 7, 2017
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    Kudos to ACB and Australians for taking tough stand. They could have very well gone SA way and defended their captain.
     
  31. Passionate Pakistani
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    Passionate Pakistani The Don

    Jun 10, 2011
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    Its never nice seeing anyone cry. Hope smith gets over it. Good luck to him.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
     
  32. MR__KHAN__JI
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    MR__KHAN__JI Talented

    Sep 5, 2010
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    Textbook choreographed damage limitation PR tactics from Cricket Australia


    The real Smith was present at the original press conference.

    What needed to be done to keep sponsors happy? That's what's been done.

    #Follow the money.

    Sent from my SM-N915A using Tapatalk
     
  33. Express Pace
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    Express Pace Cornered Tiger

    May 11, 2012
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    Only one I feel sorry for is Bancroft
     
  34. iZeeshan
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    iZeeshan Whispering Death

    May 22, 2012
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    You all make me sick. How the hell do you feel bad for this guy? He straight up tried to cheat and is now crying because of what his parents and children think of him? F that noise. He deserves everything he's getting. 1 year ban is completely fine, if Amir can sustain a 5 year ban.

    I cannot believe all this BS around "mistake" and what not I'm hearing. Australians have been blurring lines and playing uncleanly for years. So what if he's being made an example of. That's what needs to happen to correct shit.

    Jesus Christ all of you get a grip, he's crying like a baby and it's pathetic.
     
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  35. Dare2Dream
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    Dare2Dream Talented

    May 4, 2010
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    Classic way to save your career, get sympathy from everyone after getting caught. How about apologizing to all other teams/players who have been a victim of their tactics over the years? Also, are they investigating whether this was really the first time they ever did this? I didn't see anything on that and CA is hell bent on closing this chapter quickly.

    Where is the crying press conference from Warner? Looks like he will be the fall guy even though Smith was the captain and ultimately the leader who went along with the cheating.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2018
  36. Dare2Dream
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    Dare2Dream Talented

    May 4, 2010
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    It is interesting to note that people who felt strongly about spot fixing seem to think this is not as big of a deal and even feel sorry for this ban in months (not years). I bet that if the offenders were switched, people would be crying how cheating was a bigger deal and would have robbed the honest team of a win while balling a no ball here or there (spot fixing) is very unlikely to change the end result, so not as big a deal. End of the day, cheating is just another form of "match fixing" and a bigger deal than spot fixing.
     
  37. Passionate Pakistani
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    Passionate Pakistani The Don

    Jun 10, 2011
    68,298
    Save his career ? Is this even a joke ?

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  38. Express Pace
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    Express Pace Cornered Tiger

    May 11, 2012
    14,302
    Very strong statement @iZeeshan !
     
  39. Passionate Pakistani
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    Passionate Pakistani The Don

    Jun 10, 2011
    68,298
    I think there is no need to be cynical. He cheated, got punished, admitted and apologised. What else do we want from him ? As far as his crying his concerned, we dont live in his heart to know if it is true or crocodiles tears. We are human being and have to feel for someone crying.

    And to say that he is crying to save his career is borderline childish statement. We all need to understand that he came up with the admission, no one forced him and he could have easily put eceeything on bancroft he manned up and took all responsibility.. that alone is enough to move on from the topic rather than being cynical.

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  40. iZeeshan
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    iZeeshan Whispering Death

    May 22, 2012
    8,130
    Are you being sarcastic? I can take an even stronger stance but idk if people here will be able to handle it.

    Who's being cynical? I don't want anything else from him, I want all of you to stop feeling bad for him. What is there to feel bad about? He did something wrong and now he's crying about it. Isn't that how it should be?

    What's cynical about saying that he's getting what he deserves and I don't feel even an ounce of "bad" for him?
     

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