Sandpaper Gate - Steve Smith and David Warner banned for 1 year, Bancroft 9 months from all cricket

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  1. Passionate Pakistani
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    Passionate Pakistani The Don

    Jun 10, 2011
    68,286
    No my cynical point was about Dare2Dream post that classical way to save his career.



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  2. iZeeshan
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    iZeeshan Whispering Death

    May 22, 2012
    8,128
    I mean tbh it does look like a cheap PR tactic. No grown man cries like that on Live TV. Given a lot of the Aussie player reactions about how it was a mistake, it kinda seems orchestrated. But you're right, who knows.

    But you know, it's totally fine to make assumptions when it comes to Sarfraz, Amir, and other Pakistani players but when it's white people, let's assume the best of them. Suuuuure.
     
  3. Passionate Pakistani
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    Passionate Pakistani The Don

    Jun 10, 2011
    68,286
    Man if it was orchestrated than smith wouldnt hve to come out in public and admit it and would have managed it in dressing room by bancroft taking all blame nd got a one match ban.

    Not long ago Faf was caught was banned for 1 game ?? Back then Graeme Smith was captain, he didnt admit anything and everyone moved on. Steve Smith could have used the same tactic but he admitted and was banned for more than a year which is more tha enough ban.

    Furthemore, Asif, Butt and Amir cases were completely different. Even ICC laws make a life time ban on fixing and just a game ban for tempering, tells you everything about the severity of crime.

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  4. iZeeshan
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    iZeeshan Whispering Death

    May 22, 2012
    8,128
    Your ability to take an argument from one place to totally another is astounding. Good day sir.
     
  5. Passionate Pakistani
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    Passionate Pakistani The Don

    Jun 10, 2011
    68,286
    Not at all. There was no need to admit it if you are going as far as calling this a PR act.

    You also have a good day.

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  6. iZeeshan
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    iZeeshan Whispering Death

    May 22, 2012
    8,128
    I'm referring to you talking about match fixing and what not. Was not even remotely referring to that and yet some how you went there.
     
  7. Passionate Pakistani
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    Passionate Pakistani The Don

    Jun 10, 2011
    68,286
    My bad. I saw only amir and not sarfraz. I thought you were talking about that fixing scandal. My mistake.

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  8. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Indian cricketers condemn vilification of Smith, Warner

    India's star cricketers have been astounded at the treatment meted out to former Australian captain Steve Smith that left him tearfully apologising for cheating in a Test match.

    The cricket establishment in India, the sport's financial powerhouse, has avoided any public comment about the scandal engulfing Australia.

    “Fears run deep about any potential changes to the game that earns so much,” said one official.

    The one-year bans against Smith and teammate David Warner, which rule them out of the Indian Premier League, are unlikely to stop the cash flowing into the world's richest tournament. Both will miss a $1.9 million salary in the seven-week event, which starts April 7.

    But top players have expressed amazement at events in South Africa as well as the onslaught in Australia against Smith, batsman Cameron Bancroft and David Warner, after Australia were caught red-handed tampering with the ball.

    Harbhajan Singh, one of the leading spinner wicket takers in international cricket, called the ban against Smith “ridiculous”.

    “At some point in time, all international teams must have done things to get the ball to reverse. It's not a crime like match-fixing, but at the same time, they are trying to change the nature of the game,” Singh, now playing in the Indian Premier League for Chennai Superkings, said.

    Not a cheat
    Singh called the punishment “a joke” in a separate Twitter comment. “Taking the game away from someone for a year is absolutely nonsense.”

    Gautam Gambhir, captain of the Delhi Daredevils franchise, hinted that Smith and Warner could be paying for leading demands for better payments for Australian cricketers last year.

    “Are @stevesmith49 & @davidwarner31 paying for revolt for pay hike?” the veteran batsman said in a series of much remarked Twitter posts.

    Smith “doesn't look to me a cheat,” he added. “I see in him a desperate leader trying to win a Test match for his country, his team. Yes, indeed, his methods were questionable but let's not label him corrupt.”

    Gambhir called on the Australian public to go easy on Smith and his family.

    Living with “this feeling of being called a cheat is a bigger punishment” than the ban, he said.

    India plays a leading role in the International Cricket Council as its biggest source of funds. It has had its fair share of scandals, particularly the match fixing saga in 2000.

    Indian great Sachin Tendulkar was handed a one-match ban by match referee Mike Denness after a 2001 game against South Africa when he appeared to scuff the match ball.

    Tendulkar said he was removing a piece of grass and he was eventually cleared amid bitter recriminations against the referee.

    Swing ball experts Pakistan have been involved in more incidents.

    Pakistan forfeited a 2006 Test against England after umpires Darrell Hair and Billy Doctrove ruled that Pakistan had tampered with the ball.

    Inzamam ul-Haq's side refused to play in protest, and the umpires awarded the match to England. Pakistan were also later cleared of ball-tampering by the ICC.

    Najam Sethi, chairman of the Pakistan Cricket Board, said the governing body “has already taken punitive measures against players who misdemeanour. Cheating and fixing will not be tolerated.”

    Pakistan coach Mickey Arthur said his players were “good” on conduct and “almost too nice at times”.

    “The values and morals of our sides are outstanding. I have no problems with them and there has been never been any reason to doubt their integrity or to admonish them for anything they have done behaviour wise. Our boys are good,” he told AFP.

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1398517
     
  9. iZeeshan
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    iZeeshan Whispering Death

    May 22, 2012
    8,128
    Lol, that actually doesn’t even surprise me.
     
  10. ASLI-PATHAN
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    ASLI-PATHAN Cricistan Khan

    Apr 26, 2011
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  11. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Too much crying making me emotional. At least Smith didn’t read off a script, looked a bit more genuine.
     
  12. Mohsin
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    Mohsin Cornered Tiger

    Feb 21, 2010
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    A tearful Malala apologised for her role in the ball-tampering incident...

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Mohsin
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    Mohsin Cornered Tiger

    Feb 21, 2010
    14,746
    Btw you can tell Warner probably just tried to latch onto the 'sympathy wave' with his tears. Dramaybaazi
     
  14. Patriot
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    Patriot Kaptaan

    Oct 8, 2014
    25,762
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  15. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
  16. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Australia's players' union Call for bans on Smith, Warner and Bancroft to be reduced as they are 'disproportionate'

    Australia's players' union has called for a reduction in the bans handed out to Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft for their part in the ball-tampering scandal in South Africa last week, describing them as "disproportionate".

    Former captain Smith and former vice captain Warner were handed 12-month bans, and batsman Bancroft suspended for nine months by Cricket Australia after the latter was caught using a piece of sandpaper on the ball in the third test in Cape Town.

    "The proposed penalties are disproportionate relative to precedent," Australian Cricketers' Association (ACA) president Greg Dyer told a news conference in Sydney on Tuesday.

    "We ask that consideration be given to recalibrating the proposed sanctions, to consider options such as suspending or reducing part of the sanction.

    "To consider allowing the players to return to domestic cricket earlier, for example, as part of their rehabilitation."

    The players have until Thursday to appeal their bans, decisions Dyer believed were "imminent" but "highly personal" to be decided by the players with their own legal counsel.

    The trio returned to Australia at the end of last week, all three giving emotional news conferences where they accepted responsibility for their actions with none suggesting they might appeal.

    Smith and Warner, who were also stripped of their leadership positions, stand to lose millions of dollars in earnings with sponsors dropping them last week and the bans costing them their Indian Premier League contracts for this season.

    Smith and Bancroft were banned from holding leadership positions within the Australian team for two years, while Warner will never be able to hold such a position again.

    The harsher penalty for Warner reflects the findings of the Cricket Australia investigation which alleged the opening batsman was the chief instigator of the plot to cheat.

    Warner, who has said he was resigned to not playing for his country again, attracted some criticism after his news conference in Sydney on Saturday for not answering questions, instead deflecting them with a pre-prepared line.

    Bancroft was cast as the junior player led astray by Warner, while Smith appears to be well on his way to redemption after breaking down in tears after his arrival news conference.

    Dyer said the contrition of the players should be taken into account along with the precedent - no player has previously received more than a one-match ban for the offence - and a lack of due process in the Cricket Australia probe.

    "I think Australia cried with Steve Smith last Thursday. I know I certainly did," Dyer added. "We ask for this extraordinary contrition to be taken into account by Cricket Australia just as it would be in any fair and proper process."

    https://www.thenational.ae/sport/cr...reduced-as-they-are-disproportionate-1.718239
     
  17. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Warner accepts CA sanctions for ball-tampering

    David Warner has accepted the sanctions handed down to him by Cricket Australia for the ball-tampering incident in the Cape Town Test. The former vice-captain was banned from all international cricket, and the domestic matches that place in Australia, for 12 months. He will also never be considered for a leadership position within the team in the future.

    "I have today let Cricket Australia know that I fully accept the sanctions imposed on me," Warner said on Twitter. "I am truly sorry for my actions and will now do everything I can to be a better person, teammate and role model."

    Warner made his intentions public a day after former captain Steven Smith and Cameron Bancroft had also chosen not to challenge the bans imposed on them. All three players had been given the right to take the matter to a hearing and push for leniency. They had until 5 pm local time on Thursday to make their decisions; Warner made his with little over an hour left on the clock. As a result, he will only be eligible to play for Australia sometime in April 2019. The 50-over World Cup in England begins on May 30.

    On Tuesday, the Australian Cricketers' Association appealed to CA to reduce the sanctions on all three players, suggesting the punishment was disproportionate to the crime - ball-tampering. The incident itself took place on the third day at Newlands when Bancroft was caught on camera rubbing the ball with sandpaper. An investigation by CA's Head of Integrity, Iain Roy, claimed that Warner had come up with the idea and got Bancroft to tamper with the ball, while Smith was in knowledge of the plan and did not prevent it.

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/23034434/david-warner-accepts-ca-sanctions-ball-tampering
     
  18. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Smith. Warner sanctions will restore cricket's 'battered' image - Morgan

    Eoin Morgan hopes the sanctions imposed on Steve Smith and David Warner will have served to restore the reputation of a game he feels has been "battered" in recent days.

    Morgan, England's limited-overs captain, says he was "shocked" by the Australian players' attempt to alter the behaviour of the ball with sandpaper, insisting he had never experienced such a premediated plan in any team he has represented.

    But while he accepted such behaviour could damage the reputation of the game, he felt the severity of Cricket Australia's punishments - on Warner and Smith especially - sent a firm message that such tactics will not be tolerated and could improve the way the game is played around the world.

    "The sanctions imposed by Cricket Australia have shown how serious the actual mistake was, how seriously they are taking it and how seriously they regard the values, principles, spirit and laws of the game," Morgan said.

    "For the last two weeks, the game has been battered. But I'd like to think that the balance [between the damage done to the game and the benefits brought by the suspensions] changed when the sanctions were imposed, because they were serious sanctions.

    "It's one thing to say something is wrong. But to back it up with such a sanction says a huge amount. This isn't two of their worst players, either. It's two of their best. One is possibly one of their greatest ever.

    "Naturally this will pull the leash [on the way Australia play]."

    Morgan accepts there are some "grey areas" around the issue of ball-tampering. The use of sugary saliva, for example, has been prevalent for years (albeit with a distinction around whether mints and sweets are directly transferred to the ball), as has the practice of fielders returning the ball to the keeper on the bounce to scuff up one side. But, the way he sees it, Cricket Australia's actions have "gone a long way" to "saying none of it is acceptable".

    "I was shocked there was a premeditated plan," he said. "I've never heard talk like that in a dressing room.

    "Throwing the ball in, one bounce, is fine. But if you throw to the keeper from long-on or long-off, the umpires will monitor how often the ball hits the playing surface and tell you they'll change the ball if you do it again.

    "Things have changed. The LED lights on the advertising hoardings around the ground have little bulbs that stick out and they can take a huge chunk out of the ball. We have forced our bowlers to chuck it to the umpires [after it hits the board] so they don't think we have done something to the ball.

    "So, yes, there are grey areas but I think Cricket Australia have gone a long way to saying none of it is acceptable."

    It might have been relevant that Morgan was talking at the 2018 launch of All Stars, the ECB initiative aimed at introducing a new generation to the game. Confronted by dozens of enthusiastic children aged between five and eight, Morgan and his fellow ambassadors (Michael Vaughan, Sarah Taylor and Isa Guha) might naturally have been keen to focus on the more family-friendly aspects of the game.


    But Morgan, like so many in England cricket, was deeply impressed by the example of Brendon McCullum's New Zealand side at the 2015 World Cup, in particular. Seeing New Zealand play so effectively - they thrashed England so quickly in Wellington that the game ended before the lights were turned on for the day-night fixture - without resorting to any of the posturing or 'mental disintegration' that had started to become a feature of England's Test cricket in 2013 and 2014, made a big impression.

    "I massively endorse the way New Zealand play the game," Morgan said. "Just look at the Test series in New Zealand. You have two fantastic ambassadors for the game - Joe Root and Kane Williamson - playing hard but enjoying the game. Nothing has come close to being controversial. And people have enjoyed watching it.

    "You can talk about it [playing the right way] all the time, but living it and breathing it is a different thing. You have to recognise when it's veering too far the wrong way. And it doesn't stop you winning."

    Parents wanting their children to take part in this year's All Stars sessions can register now via allstarscricket.co.uk .

    http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_...nctions-restore-cricket-battered-image-morgan
     
  19. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Smith, Bancroft won't contest Cricket Australia sanctions

    Steve Smith and Cameron Bancroft will not contest the sanctions imposed on them by Cricket Australia in the wake of the ball-tampering scandal, the duo announced via Twitter on Wednesday (April 4).

    I would give anything to have this behind me and be back representing my country. But I meant what I said about taking full responsibility as Captain of the team. I wont be challenging the sanctions. Theyve been imposed by CA to send a strong message and I have accepted them.

    — Steve Smith (@stevesmith49) April 4, 2018

    Today I lodged the paperwork with Cricket Australia and will be accepting the sanction handed down. I would love to put this behind me and will do whatever it takes to earn back the trust of the Australian public. Thank you to all those who have sent messages of support

    — Cameron Bancroft (@cbancroft4) April 4, 2018

    After revelations of ball-tampering in the Cape Town Test, Cricket Australia had imposed a one-year ban on Steve Smith along with not being eligible for a leadership position for another year after his return. David Warner, who was revealed as the chief conspirator, would never be able to hold a leadership position with Australia even after serving his one-year ban. Cameron Bancroft, meanwhile, copped a nine-month suspension.

    The trio had until April 5 to contest the sanctions imposed on them by the board.

    The duo of Smith and Warner was also banned from the Indian Premier League, where they were captains for their respective franchises, Rajasthan Royals and SunRisers Hyderabad, in the aftermath of the incident.

    While the two accepted the sanctions, it is believed that Warner is likely to contest the one against him.

    http://www.cricbuzz.com/cricket-new...ontest-sanctions-imposed-by-cricket-australia
     
  20. Patriot
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    Patriot Kaptaan

    Oct 8, 2014
    25,762
    Ponting defends Australia's team culture

    The ball-tampering scandal in Cape Town is being seen as much more than just that. Australia's team culture has come under the scanner, with suggestions that such a fall was inevitable in a win-at-all-costs side. Outgoing Australia coach Darren Lehmann even said New Zealand might be a good example to follow for on-field behaviour, and Cricket Australia ordered an independent review into the team culture.

    However, former Australia captain and a possible candidate for the role of coach, Ricky Ponting, believes the talk about the team culture is out of proportion.

    Ponting, currently in India as head coach of IPL franchise Delhi Daredevils, addressed the issue for the first time at a press conference on Thursday. Ponting expressed shock at the events in Cape Town, and said the reaction from Cricket Australia was befitting. However, he didn't necessarily feel the team culture had deteriorated drastically.

    "The cultural issue for me is really an interesting thing because if we wind the clock back to just a couple of months, when Australia won the Ashes like they did, there was no talk about cultural problems or issues whatsoever," Ponting said. "I honestly feel on this occasion the cultural stuff that's been spoken about has probably been blown out of proportion to a certain degree."

    Ponting, however, did not play down what a big disappointment the ball-tampering incident was for him and the rest of Australia. "As a past player and past captain, I was quite shocked to see what actually took place out on the field," he said. "The pleasing thing for me is that now it seems the issue is starting to come to an end. We hear this morning that David Warner also accepted his sanction, means all three guys have accepted the sanctions before them."

    Ponting said the country was jolted by what they saw. "Look, when I was back at home a week and half ago, if you think it was big news over here, it was astronomical how big the issue was in Australia, and rightly so," he said. "As Australians, we like to play the game hard, we like to play the game fair. Our fans expect the Australian player to play that way. I think the reaction back in Australia was as big as it was because the Australian public felt the Australian players had not played the game in a fair way.

    "It seems it's like coming to an end, it's a good thing for the game's sake, it's a good thing for the player's sake as well, that they can try and get away from it all now. As hard as that's going to be for them, it's also a good thing for cricket in Australia as well. Now that the Test series is over, the guys have got a few weeks to get away from it all and then start rebuilding what has sort of collapsed for them over the last couple of weeks."

    When asked how he would have reacted to the incident if he had been in a position to act, Ponting said it would be unfair for him to say, but did acknowledge that Cricket Australia's sanctions were pretty much necessary.

    "There's a very big picture there for the world game's sake, and Cricket Australia, I think, have reacted to what the world game pretty much demanded," he said. "The world game and the Australian public demanded that these players were dealt with and treated in a certain way.

    "Now it would appear that 12-month bans would appear to be a very severe ban. If you go back to what the ICC sanction was: one-game ban for Smith and nothing for the other two. You can understand the gap is vast between what the ICC deemed fair [and what CA handed out]. I wouldn't comment on what I would have done. It would be unfair."
     
  21. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Smith, Warner, Bancroft lose Australian national contracts

    Tim Paine, Australia's 46th Test captain, returned to Cricket Australia’s national contract list for the 2018-19 season after missing out on the initial list last year, while five players were awarded contracts for the first time in a new-look list of 20 announced on Wednesday 11 April.

    Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft, all currently serving bans for their roles in the ball-tampering incident during the Cape Town Test last month, did not feature in the list comprising men’s players to represent Australia across formats next year.

    Paine missed out initially in 2017-18 but was upgraded to a national contract later in the year. He might not feature regularly in the limited-overs formats, though, given the inclusion of Alex Carey, the wicket-keeper who is one of the five new faces.

    Kane Richardson, Andrew Tye and Jhye Richardson, the fast bowlers, and all-rounder Marcus Stoinis are the other new names in the squad.

    “This is an exciting opportunity for these players, who all deserve to be on this list,” said Trevor Hohns, the national selector. “Andrew is an experienced bowler, who has been able to translate strong domestic performances onto the international stage in white-ball cricket.

    “Alex is the second wicket-keeper in this squad, alongside Tim Paine. He is a promising young player who has had a strong domestic summer and performed well in his international opportunities to date with bat and gloves.

    “Kane has been rewarded for strong performances in the Sheffield Shield and his efforts when selected for Australia in limited-overs cricket, where he continues to impress.

    “Jhye is a young fast bowler who has been on the fringe of selection in all three forms of the game. He’s an exciting prospect who has played ODI and T20 cricket for Australia this summer, and was in the Test squad for the recent tour of South Africa.

    “Marcus is a player who has featured regularly for Australia in limited-overs cricket over the last 12 months, and is a player of promise who has impressed with his all-round capabilities on the international stage.”

    Jackson Bird, who played the Boxing Day Ashes Test in Melbourne in December, and Chadd Sayers, who made his Test debut in Johannesburg recently, both missed out, as did the injured duo of James Pattinson and Nathan Coulter-Nile. Adam Zampa, D'Arcy Short and Chris Lynn were the others to be excluded from the list.

    However, as per Cricket Australia's system, players not awarded contracts as part of the initial squad of 20 can earn upgrades throughout the year by accruing 12 upgrade points. Players receive five points for a Test, two for an ODI and one for a T20I.

    Australia’s next assignment is in England in June, for a limited-overs tour comprising five ODIs and a one-off T20I.

    https://www.icc-cricket.com/news/661709
     
  22. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    No softening of bans for tainted trio: Cricket Australia

    Refuting all claims of softening of bans on former skipper Steve Smith and his deputy David Warner for their involvement in ball tampering in the Cape Town Test, Cricket Australia on Wednesday dismissed the reports as "purely speculative".

    "At no stage have we, or are we considering lessening the current sanctions in place for respective players in relation to the incident in South Africa," a CA spokesperson told cricket.com.au.

    "The CA Code of Conduct does not allow for reversal or lessening of sanctions once players have fully accepted the charges.

    "The current articles published are purely speculative," he added.

    Smith and Warner were banned for a year under CA's Code of Conduct following an investigation into their involvement along with opener Cameron Bancroft into the ball-tampering incident that unfolded during the third Test against South Africa at Cape Town last March.

    All three players accepted the charges laid against them and the subsequent punishments administered with Bancroft suspended for nine months, without pursuing the option of appeal, and will remain unavailable for international and Australian domestic cricket until their bans are served.

    https://www.khaleejtimes.com/sport/cricket/no-softening-of-bans-for-tainted-trio-cricket-australia
     
  23. Patriot
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    Patriot Kaptaan

    Oct 8, 2014
    25,762
    good. they are lucky to escape life ban
     
  24. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
    37,894
    Call to shorten bans on Smith, Warner grows

    Sydney: The Australian Cricketers’ Association (ACA) called on Tuesday for the immediate lifting of lengthy bans imposed on Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft after the release of a scathing report into the culture of Australian cricket.

    Among the findings, the review released on Monday said that to view the ball-tampering scandal, which led to the bans as “the failure of a handful of players” would be a mistake.

    [​IMG]
    Smith and Warner are seven months into one-year bans, while Bancroft will be eligible to return in December after his suspension for attempting to tamper with the ball during a Test against South Africa in Cape Town in March.

    Greg Dyer, the head of the Australian players’ union, said all three players had been punished enough.

    “Given there is now independent verification that CA’s system and culture were contributory factors, the ACA calls for the lifting of the board-imposed penalties on Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft,” ACA chief Dyer told a news conference in Melbourne.

    “The players have already lost time in the game, lost chances to play for Australia, endured public humiliation and faced massive financial penalties.

    “My message to Cricket Australia is this: these contrite men have suffered enough. Let them play.”

    Cricket Australia (CA) Chairman David Peever, in his reaction to the review on Monday, made it clear that the board had handed out the sanctions after “full and thoughtful process” and that they would remain in place.

    Former Australia coach Darren Lehmann, who stood down in the wake of the scandal, also joined calls to have the bans set aside and allow the trio to return to state and international cricket.

    “I think they should be back but it’s up to the board to make that decision, not me,” Lehmann told the Sydney Morning Herald.

    “I think the general feeling around Australia, certainly the people I talk to, is they want them playing again, at worst domestic cricket.

    “Now the findings have come down they should be reviewing the sanctions on the three players.”

    While Lehmann’s view of the mood of the Australian public might be reflective of the “bubble” the review said surrounded top players, Test greats Shane Warne, Adam Gilchrist and Doug Walters have also called for a reduction to the bans.

    Test paceman Josh Hazlewood said on Monday the players would like to see former captain Smith, vice-captain Warner and batsman Bancroft back on the field. “We’d love to see the guys back playing as soon as possible. That’s not really our decision,” he told a news conference.

    “The bans have been handed down and the boys have copped them, as you’d expect. That’s really out of our hands, as players.”

    https://gulfnews.com/sport/cricket/australia/call-to-shorten-bans-on-smith-warner-grows-1.2295734
     
  25. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Whispering Death

    Dec 26, 2011
    8,345
    I agree-
     

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