Shan Masood - are you impressed with him? How A Secret Coach Helped Shan Masood - upd # 17.

Discussion in 'Cricket Talk' started by Del, Jan 6, 2019.

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  1. Del
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    Del Whispering Death

    Dec 21, 2016
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    He had major flaws in his technique when last visited ENG, he was dropped, went back to domestic, worked on his game, put strong performances and came back strongly.

    I am very impressed with his performance on such tough tour of SA so far. He proved many of us wrong, myself including :) (and I am glad).

    He gives credit to lots of domestic cricket and games he played for Pakistan A. Not to mention he's a good fielder too and a very handy part-time bowler.

    I think Pakistan should give him more changes.

    That said, I would like to hear opinion of folks here about Shan, are you impressed with his work ethics and hand work, which he put in his game?
     
  2. KingOfDoosra
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    KingOfDoosra Sultan of Swing

    Jun 8, 2012
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    Very much.

    Would be very surprised if he doesn't get selected for the ODIs now, replacing Imam.
     
  3. Mohammed Bilal
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    Mohammed Bilal Tracer Bullet

    Jul 17, 2017
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    Really impressed, quite bewildered, it’s like Jahid Ali thing I mentioned, you just never know with our domestic system a guy with mediocre stats doesn’t go and just make a century vs Mark Wood and co in England but a guy like Ifti can bash domestic attacks all he wants, he can’t buy a run at the top level.

    Love his work ethic, he’s got shame, some of our cricketers like Khurram Manzoor are shameless, this guy even when reporters like parchi Yaya were making him out to be a victim he clearly said that he was in fault and coach and everyone else were right, it takes a lot to say that and look at him now, I’m so happy for him btw, he’s a great guy and concentrates hard on his fitness and fielding so it was a shame he wasn’t performing, he’s already done something for Pakistan when he won that Test in SL for us.



    One thing I don’t get though, when all bowlers in domestics are 130 kph how has he faced Dale and co so easily also in the A games he did get bowled and LB quite a lot and against Mark Wood and I though this might be same old Shan but again proved us wrong but I think Shan has his own bowling machine, no way any domestic batsman can handle this pace after being used to 125-135 max bowling in domestics.
     
  4. godzilla
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    godzilla Talented

    May 12, 2016
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    why is anyone concluding anything based on three innings?
     
  5. Mohammed Bilal
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    Mohammed Bilal Tracer Bullet

    Jul 17, 2017
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    Because this is the hardest conditions and imo this is the greatest attack Pakistan has ever faced, I don’t think Pak faced this much quality, maybe in West Indies but even then they had a bowler missing never did they face Malcom, Holding, Garner and Roberts all together.

    If not the greatest it’s right up there.
     
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  6. Passionate Pakistani
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    Passionate Pakistani The Don

    Jun 10, 2011
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    This. We are quick to make heroes or zeroes on basis of few performances. Lets give him a good run and then see what he is made of.

    Some of the talks of him as captain are borderline moronic. Like srsly guy came back and had couple of half centuries n make him captain of test format is one of the most moronic thing i have heard.

    Before that was make Fakhar captain now he failed so shan is good. If Imam had scored few half centuries, then make him captain.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
     
  7. godzilla
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    godzilla Talented

    May 12, 2016
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    q: is player x the best/worst to ever play for pakistan after three innings?

    pakistani fanboy:

     
  8. Ahson8
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    Ahson8 Sultan of Swing

    Jun 9, 2012
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    Yes. Next test captain InshaAllah
     
  9. Ahson8
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    Ahson8 Sultan of Swing

    Jun 9, 2012
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    I’d agree with you, but our test team’s batting is kind of in shambles in the moment, so much to the point that there really aren’t any other alternatives for the captaincy.

    Sarfraz has already hinted he will step down as test captain after this series and I think the next test will be his last as captain.

    Now let’s look at who the alternatives could be. Azhar looks done, Shafiq is way too hot and cold and probably shouldn’t be in the team, Haris is injury prone and Babar is too young at this stage - besides I don’t think he is a great tactician and it’s best to let him focus on batting. Some people have suggested Yasir Shah, but don’t think the PCB is a fan of making a bowler test captain, and rightly so.

    Shan always had a good work ethic, and now he’s scoring runs which was the only (major) problem with him before. He’s also captained for Pakistan A and got good results, unlike Rizwan’s captaincy who looked clueless. He’s got a lot of things going on for him that make me want to support him - he’s batting well, fielding well, a hard worker and therefore a good role-model on that front and speaks well too (not that important, but still)...

    Besides, do you genuinely think his performance would be worse than Sarfraz’s currently is in tests ?
     
  10. Sultan Yusuf
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    Sultan Yusuf Emerging Player

    Sep 1, 2010
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    As others have alluded to, can’t judge over such a small sample.

    However, he has shown he’s adept at playing the short ball better than anyone else in the team
     
  11. Munna
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    Munna Moderator-e-Aala

    Oct 4, 2014
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    From whatever little batting of his I have seen this series and along with the commies analysis, it does look like he has improved his technique big time and is a better batsman than before.

    But lets not forget he's still averaging 27 at intl level, making a comeback after a hiatus, is probably surrounded by egoistic "seniors".... so making him a captain atm is actually quite pre-mature.

    As fans, good for us that we have time till later this year for our next test series. By then, hopefully Shan will be tested in LOI's so he can prove his mettle in the other format(s) until next test series and establish a better case for himself for the test captaincy.
     
  12. ComradeVenom
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    ComradeVenom Tracer Bullet

    Jul 24, 2012
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    The guy went out and hired his own coach to improve his batting.

    Supposedly he has PCB connections but I never heard his name mentioned on the news or twitter etc.

    Instead of playing victim he improved himself, made a stack of runs to push down the selectors doors and then made runs in tough conditions.

    All of his work should be appreciated.
     
  13. Del
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    Del Whispering Death

    Dec 21, 2016
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    I purposely didnt say it, otherwise, people will tag me as 'troll' :p.
     
  14. ASLI-PATHAN
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    ASLI-PATHAN Cricistan Khan

    Apr 26, 2011
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    He is easily the fittest guy in Pakistani team. Hard work never goes to waste. He should continue doing what he is doing. He should be given a good run in both ODIs and Test teams. Can't be any worse than Feeqa to whim we gave almost 9 years without any benefits.
     
  15. Bilal123
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    Bilal123 Tracer Bullet

    Dec 11, 2010
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    MashaAllah perfect role model. His ways are so opposite of the common Pakistani. Hard working. InshaAllah long may it continue. Hope he rubs off on others too
     
  16. godzilla
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    godzilla Talented

    May 12, 2016
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    his dad was on the board of directors of the PCB. so yes, he did have connections when he was shoved in the side without any performances, and then predictably failed.

    that said, credit where its due, he has been exemplary in the one day format domestically, so theres no doubt that he deserves a recall there. which of course the selectors have not done, because they are fixed on imam immense potential in 2025 ul haq.

    his long game performances domestically, however, are mediocre. perhaps he has improved enough that that was the past versus a new reformed player. but as in the case of Hafeez and his second coming, that needs proving rather than assuming, and three scores, no matter what the conditions, is an idiotic number of innings to draw any firm conclusions.

    the best one can say is that he looks promising. I havent seen his last two or three seasons FC stats - if they are mid 40s, I would say thats enough evidence. if they are not, I would say the jury is out, and I chances are hes another hafeez in tests.

    I would still definitley have him in my odi side which has been obvious for a year or so given how exceptional his LA stats have been, but which our stupid head sector and thick head coach are unable to see apparently.
     
  17. Del
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    Del Whispering Death

    Dec 21, 2016
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    How A Secret Coach Helped Shan Masood Resurrect His Career.

    Shan Masood is a determined and driven individual. A degree in Management and Sport Sciences at Loughborough University, as well as a rise to the top of Pakistan cricket at the same time, underlined his all-round abilities, even if it meant having to miss lectures. Cricket soon took over for Masood, however, and he was touted as a talented young opening batsman who would perform well at the highest level.

    After impressing in domestic cricket, the left-hander achieved a lifelong dream of making his Test debut on his 24th birthday against South Africa in 2013. He immediately had an influence early on with a knock of 75 in the first innings – a match which Masood has fond memories of. “Initially, I was nervous,” he recalls. “South Africa were the number one Test team in the world, they had the top two bowlers in the world in Dale Steyn and Vernon Philander. But what helped me was that I had experience on a Pakistan tour prior to that in Zimbabwe so I got the feeling of being in the Pakistan dressing room. I also got some runs in a practice match against the South Africans prior to that first Test, so I already had a bit experience of playing against the best team in the world, and the nerves had calmed down a little, which helped. I remember receiving some advice from my coach, Dav Whatmore, who told me just to watch the ball closely and play the game like you have before. Thankfully it paid off in that first innings.”

    Masood’s path as a batsman since that impressive first knock has been an uneven one, to say the least. An uncertain rest of the series followed, as well as a period out of the side before returning to make his maiden Test hundred (125) in a thrilling record run chase to seal the series for Pakistan in Sri Lanka. It was a performance that certainly stood out for Masood. “That run-chase, along with my partnership (242) with my mentor Younis Khan, who also scored a hundred, as well as playing in that sort of situation was an absolute treat. It turned out to be a very significant knock for me and the country.”

    The 27-year-old, born in Kuwait, knows only too well of the challenge that Test cricket brings and that “it is not a game for the faint-hearted” – something that became even more apparent during the tour of England last summer. The series, drawn 2-2, was a sparkling effort from the team, though Masood struggled, scoring just 71 runs from four innings at an average of 17.75. And despite positive early signs (a score of 62 in a warm-up match vs Somerset), Masood felt that wrong shot selection was the catalyst to his downfall.

    “When I came into that series, including our two warm-up games against Somerset and Sussex, I felt in good nick. I thought I would have a really good time of it and finally stamp my authority on such big series. Playing in England is a huge thing for any aspiring Pakistani batsman. Unfortunately, things didn’t go to plan. I had the opportunities during the four innings. For example, I managed to bat through a difficult period in the second innings of the first Test, was on 24 and I got out playing a silly shot. Again, at Old Trafford, I got through a similar period in our first innings when the rest of the team was struggling on a track which was not the most natural for any Asian batsman. Yet in general, during that series, I kept making shot-selection errors, which was mainly trying to play a back-foot punch through the covers. But when you face quality bowlers in such conditions, it is difficult to execute such a shot. A better way would have been to leave or play more horizontal bat shots to those deliveries, which would have been less risky.”

    James Anderson has proven to be a particular nemesis for Masood, dismissing him six times in eight innings in England and the UAE, though despite his issues against England’s premier fast bowler, Masood feels he can use it as a way of improving in the future. “When you look at the record (six dismissals vs Anderson), people are bound to say I had problems facing him, but Jimmy had been the number one Test bowler in the world for quite a while, along with Dale Steyn. He has got batsmen like Sachin Tendulkar and Virat Kohli out on a regular basis, so for a young man making his way in international cricket, I gave myself time. Nevertheless, apart from two dismissals when I got balls that I couldn’t do anything about, most of the wickets were down to me making silly, uncharacteristic mistakes. I will learn from it and make sure they will not happen again.”

    After being replaced for the third Test against England by Sami Aslam, Masood reached a crossroads. A change had to be made. In order to get his career back on track, a new way of thinking had to come into the fold. Step forward, Gary Palmer. After playing first-class cricket for Somerset, Palmer is a coach who believes that an open stance prevents players from falling towards the offside. He is convinced that attention to detail on technique, as well as hitting hundreds of balls to implement the method and ‘build muscle memory’, is paramount to a batsman’s success. They are methods that former England captain Alastair Cook has benefitted from hugely since he began working with Palmer back in 2015. It proved to be an integral part of Cook’s resurgence in form.

    Masood is a long-time admirer of Cook and after hearing of the success that was being made from the partnership with Palmer – the pair still work together – Masood decided to take a chance and use the former Somerset man as the help he needed in his aim to improve as a batsman. “I have always followed Cook with an interest,” revealed Masood. “He and Graeme Smith have probably been the best two opening batsmen of the recent era and have churned out runs in the toughest conditions. So after noticing and then reading about the changes Cook made under Gary (Palmer), I researched Gary’s unique ways of batting coaching. And considering the fact that in other sports, especially tennis, players hire private coaches all the time, so I thought ‘why not?’ and gave him a call.

    “There were some technical changes I needed to make and I wanted to try something different and ‘out of the box’. During our first conversation, he told me what he thought was wrong with me and when I heard what he had to say and what he wanted me to do, I completely bought into it. Our first net session was three hours, a time we don’t usually practice all at once as players. It was physically and mentally demanding. And when I tried to get the hang of what he was trying to implement, it was something I was willing to take on. I then went back to domestic cricket and applied what I learned with Gary out into the middle.”

    Palmer’s methods have proven to be successful with numerous amounts of batsmen from all levels of the game, not least Alastair Cook. His ‘ABC’ method (Alignment, Balance and Completion of shot) has proven to be popular throughout his coaching career. Palmer works privately with a number of professional and international cricketers and in addition, runs the ‘Palmer Cricket Academy’ for aspiring young cricketers.

    Masood believes that Palmer stands out from other coaches for two reasons. “Gary bases his coaching around hours and hours of repetition. He gets you to bat for three hours – something I have not done before in a session.” The Pakistani batsman, along with his domestic team mates, particularly bought into Palmer’s theory of ‘four angles’ – a systematic and innovative session designed for technical perfection. “We practiced ‘four angles’ a lot,” continued Masood. “We worked on bowlers coming over the wicket with both inswing and outswing, and the same with round the wicket also. It was much more realistic, match-specific practice, which allowed me to have a set technique for every kind of situation in the game. So those are the two unique things about Gary: the repetition and his method of ‘four angles’.”
    Even a man as modest as Masood believes that he has made positive technical changes under Palmer’s coaching. “Gary has made me open my stance up more, as well as stay more still at the crease so that I’m not on the move by the time the ball has been delivered, therefore reducing the chance of me being late on the ball. I also have a better flow to my bat swing now. It is not as rigid and robotic as it was before. It feels more natural now and has allowed me to play certain shots better than I could before.”

    Those technical changes have allowed Masood to sparkle on the pitch in domestic cricket back home in Pakistan. During the recent Departmental One-Day cup, he finished the tournament with 420 runs for United Bank Limited. His average of 70 was the second best out of any batsman in the competition to play seven innings or over, behind only Ahmed Shehzad. Once again, it was only Shehzad who scored more hundreds than Masood’s two during that period. Masood also added another century (136) for Islamabad in Pakistan’s Regional One-Day cup.

    Despite the strides made through Palmer’s guidance, however, Masood still feels he is ‘work in progress’ and prefers to look at his role-model Alastair Cook as the more completed student of his new coach. “Gary is a brilliant coach and if you want to measure someone, measure what Cook has been doing. Ever since he started working with Gary, you can see that he is hitting the ball better down the ground and he is scoring more fluently and quicker in Test matches also. He is actually the final product that people can associate with Gary Palmer – that’s why I went to Gary, having seen the way Cook changed his game.

    “In terms of myself, the season did go well. I started to play a few more shots that I could not before and I started scoring quicker. Now I feel I am in better control of my game and I have a process. And as a batsman, the best thing is that I now have more options. That is what Gary has given me, because of the fact we worked more on technique. Now I can have different strategies and different ways of tackling different situations, due to the fact that I have a set base and I can trust my batting abilities much more.”

    Palmer is a strong believer in a solid technique being key for all batsmen. He has a high standard of shot execution in a grooving environment with a real eye for technical perfection. He aims to spot and fix even the smallest of faults in a batsman’s game. However, he has never coached with an international side. Yet Masood believes that the former Somerset man, having worked with him over the past few months, could offer a lot to any side, if given the opportunity. “You have to be receptive enough to work with someone like Gary,” continued the opening batsman, who has played nine Tests so far. “He has the unique ability to be able to work with different kinds of individuals. I’m sure that, from a technical point of view, he will rectify any player’s errors. I’m also sure he would do a great job with whoever else he works with.”

    As a result of taking his improvements with Palmer into the domestic game, Masood has been tipped to make a comeback to the Pakistan Test side for their upcoming tour of the West Indies. And given the inconsistent form of Pakistan’s top order during their recent series in Australia and New Zealand, the case for recalling the left-hander has become a credible one. Though Masood, regardless of a potential return to the Test arena, is ignoring the whispers and is focused solely on improving even more. “I don’t want to look at things like a comeback or regaining my place. The reason why is that I just want to make sure that every day I am getting better as a batsman, as a cricketer and as an individual. That is all I want to do.

    “If I keep scoring runs, then I am sure people can’t ignore it and that is all I can do. I am never satisfied with what I have, even if I get a hundred or play well, I like to look at the things I have not done well and try to work on them – that is my aim. I consider myself as a student of the game I want to keep learning until the day I stop playing. Things are going well at the moment and I have now found a process that I have been able to trust and I just want to carry that on.
    “If I keep working on what I am doing with the right people, the correct frame of mind and maximum effort, then I am sure things will turn around. The main goal is to make yourself a better player. Once you do that, then you are more likely to score runs, wherever you play. It’s all about making sure I have the self-belief, a high skill level and good physical fitness. If I combine those factors then I am sure a chance will come somewhere down the line.”

    Indeed, that chance could well be on the horizon, and he has Gary Palmer to thank. Both Masood and Cook have reaped the rewards from taking a chance and working with a personal batting coach – a move that has generally been frowned upon in recent years. And you would be forgiven to think how much progress other international players would make by using help from the likes of Palmer. It certainly seems like a worthwhile move, and Masood is the latest player to prove so.

    https://lastwordoncricket.com/2017/03/01/shan-masood-interview-coach/
     
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  18. godzilla
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    godzilla Talented

    May 12, 2016
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    fascinating article, and shows an intelligent and industrious mindset. that of course does not mean talent, however. anyone able to see what his FC form has been like the last three years? im still convinced he should be a certainty in the one day side, but yet to be convinced for tests. his LA form has been literally outstanding.
     
  19. godzilla
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    godzilla Talented

    May 12, 2016
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    here we go, his career averages by season in LA and FC:

    http://www.pcboard.com.pk/Pakistan/Players/84/84259/a_Batting_by_Season.html

    in LA since 15-16 he has been a monster - and yet hasnt been picked to play ODIs. this should be thrown into inzi and Mickey's faces. it coincides with that article.

    now look at the long form of the game, FC:

    http://www.pcboard.com.pk/Pakistan/Players/84/84259/f_Batting_by_Season.html

    on the same time line, 15-16, hes been awful.

    I calculated his averages since the 15-16 season, assuming thats when the new improved Shan Masood emerged. it coincides with the date of that article and it coincides with a total change in his LA scores.

    LA average since 15-16: 3,213 runs at a massive 70 average.
    FC average since 15-16: 2,283 runs at an awful 31 average.

    two conclusions:

    1) in case further proof were needed, this is black and white proof that you CANNOT mix formats . a player good/bad in one has absolutely no bearing on how he performs in another. thats black and white, very strong evidence right there.

    2) he should have been number 1 selection in ODI s. the PCB have done this for decades where they ruin a player by playing him in the wrong format, and there is a real risk that happens here again. maybe its just a matter of time and he is on the cusp of re-emerging in his long form game, maybe - but there is no evidence of that. you select him after he's proven that, not before. and those numbers suggest that he has re-emerged already, and he is unable to play the long form .
     
  20. Mohammed Bilal
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    Mohammed Bilal Tracer Bullet

    Jul 17, 2017
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    No harm in playing him in Tests if he’s making the best bowling attack in the world look ordinary, it’s all about making use of form.
     

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