Wahab has not won us a game in two years - Arthur

Discussion in 'Cricket Talk' started by maddgenius, Apr 12, 2018.

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  1. iho
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    iho Smooth Operator

    Aug 7, 2010
    4,153
    This 32 year old bowls faster than any of our young guns
     
  2. Phenom
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    Phenom Emerging Player

    Aug 23, 2017
    825
    Bowling fast is not everything.The average of 33 after 26 tests is below average output from a player who has been playing internationally for 7 years.If he had a better skillset these stats would be different.
     
  3. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Tracer Bullet

    Dec 26, 2011
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    Bhai you are the one that says Amir is the second coming of Wasim lol
     
  4. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Tracer Bullet

    Dec 26, 2011
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    So what? A 37yr Sami is still clocking 147kph.
     
  5. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Tracer Bullet

    Dec 26, 2011
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    I don’t mind Wahab in Test cricket..he is good with old ball in his hand.

    He needs to reconsider Amir’s role in the side too.
     
  6. Shahzad.Firdous
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    Shahzad.Firdous Whispering Death

    May 29, 2010
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    Amir is the 2nd coming of Wasim, Wahab Wiki Waqar Younus and Mohd Irfan Joel Garner!!
     
  7. iho
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    iho Smooth Operator

    Aug 7, 2010
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    Records also show that he has been the best pacer for Pakistan in test matches ahead of Amir
     
  8. Mohammed Bilal
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    Mohammed Bilal Smooth Operator

    Jul 17, 2017
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    If your going by speed the bowling attack should be Irfan, Sami and Wahab.

    Makes me sad really mentioning them names as they had the ability to become big bowlers but unfortunately all three have been wasted.

    Wahab has been decent over the last year but I don’t think he was successful in NZ in 2016 which is quite similar to early summer here in England conditions wise.
     
  9. s_h_a_f
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    s_h_a_f Tracer Bullet

    Dec 26, 2011
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    LOL
     
  10. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Discarded pacer Wahab Riaz responds to Mickey Arthur’s criticism

    Pakistan national team head coach Mickey Arthur’s latest subject of criticism is none other than the discarded pacer Wahab Riaz. He wasn’t included in the recently announced 25-man Test probables for the upcoming Ireland and England tours. Arthur wants the pacer to push himself and get out of the comfort zone to represent the national side.

    According to reports, Wahab took part in a fitness test and he scored 17.4, which is above the qualification mark but, Arthur wanted the pacer to touch at least 19 to get into the probable list. The failure in the fitness test is the main reason behind his omission from the Test camp for the upcoming UK tour.

    “He has not won us a game in two years,” Arthur told ESPNCricinfo. “I expect players that have been around for a long time to be winning us games and setting standards. Otherwise, we will invest in younger players who have long futures. We have good youngsters around. [Dropping] Wahab is a big decision but we have chosen a squad according to the time of year, country and conditions. The guys need to push themselves and get out of their comfort zones.”

    Wahab responds to the criticism
    When asked about his omission from the Test camp, the pacer said that his performances in both domestic and international cricket are up to the mark and he further added that he’s doing whatever is needed to get back into the national camp. He concluded it by stressing that he’s the top pacer in Test cricket for Pakistan at the moment.

    “If you look at my performances in domestic cricket or during the last Test match for Pakistan, you will see that I have performed well. As a player, I am doing what needs to be done [to get selected], I am in no position to say anything about it. As a player, my job is to perform. Overall, I have performed in Tests whenever I’ve played and given my best. In terms of the wickets column, I think I will be on the top,” he said as quoted by Business Recorder.

    https://www.crictracker.com/discarded-pacer-wahab-riaz-responds-mickey-arthurs-criticism/
     
  11. Shahzad.Firdous
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    Shahzad.Firdous Whispering Death

    May 29, 2010
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    I like Wahab's reply! Arthur's criticism is just so harsh in my opinion! Wahab is going through a difficult time and in this type of situation, Bob Woolmer would have put his arm around him rather than bash him publicly!!
    @Ahson8 @SwingNSeam @Don Quixote
     
  12. chandtara
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    chandtara Mr Cricistan

    Jun 18, 2011
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    Was Arthur right to drop Wahab?

    [​IMG]
    If nothing else, Pakistan are likely to miss Wahab Riaz's experience in England Cricket Australia/Getty Images
    Four years ago, Mitchell Johnson was the rage in fast bowling. Real pace is never unfashionable, and even though bowlers are consistently bowling at higher pace than ever before, an uncomplicated idea like Johnson can become a virus.

    It was never going to take much for Waqar Younis to fall for it, so he sought to re-unleash Wahab Riaz, having unleashed him in Tests in his first stint as coach in 2010. Wahab was low-maintenance, in that all Waqar had to do was tell him to go out there and bowl as quick as he could - a bit like Imran Khan had told him early in his own career

    In an attack heavily reliant on spin, with a samey set of smart but not express supporting fast bowlers, Wahab's left-arm, low-arm angles and high pace were clear assets. He could bowl a good bouncer, but more importantly, given its historically low yield for Pakistani fast bowling, he was unafraid to use it. Plus, his selection was comforting because it meant Pakistan still believed in and indulged extreme pace.

    Which is why it has been a little unsettling to see that he has been discarded, and so definitively that he wasn't even considered good enough to make a probables camp of, presumably, the 25 best players in Pakistan. At nearly 33 and already out of the white-ball squads, this smells like the end.

    Among the more intriguing aspects of Wahab is that he has never really been obsessed over like so many Pakistani fast bowlers. There are no blind devotees or blinded haters. Those extremes should be an occupational hazard, especially accounting for the extremes of Wahab's performances - a century conceded in ten overs one day, a game-turning nine-over spell another. For what he does, he is fairly low-profile. Accordingly, there haven't been pockets of outrage about his exclusion, or smug expressions of vindication from those who never thought highly of him (or can't forget the jacket). People have shrugged and moved on

    Whereas, the reasons to persist with him are easy to find. Like the one that says he's basically Pakistan's most effective fast bowler in Tests since August 2014, when Waqar brought him back. (Only Yasir Shah has more wickets for Pakistan in that period.) Not easy wickets either - 11 of Wahab's 19 Tests have been in the UAE, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, the slowest of the world's slow pitches, on which he has nearly two-thirds of his wickets. Over 80% of his victims are from the top seven. No Pakistani fast bowler has played more Tests, if experience counts for anything, which, in England this summer it will.

    Easier with Wahab are to allow moments, not just data, to become reasons in his favour. When the game is drifting away from Sarfraz Ahmed, who will he turn to in his attack to create a ripple? The way Wahab did in Dubai against England and Sri Lanka last year? Who will disrupt and agitate like Wahab did at The Oval in 2016? The scorecard grants him two wickets in England's second innings, but on the final day, as Jonny Bairstow darkened Pakistan's mood, it was Wahab who forced the light in. Yes, it was madcap - he went for runs, and was ultimately sent off 4.3 overs into his spell for running onto the pitch too many times, but he engineered the two wickets in two balls that sealed the win. The first - a run-out off his own bowling - doubled up as a reminder of his innate athleticism.

    Much later that season, in Australia, when The Oval felt like a lie, he was Pakistan's least bad bowler in a series that was Pakistan's worst as a bowling side. In Sydney, he even revealed a middle ground, where he could scale down the pace, go outside off and just chill there - like a true Misbah fast bowler.

    Mickey Arthur complained. Given Pakistan haven't won many Tests in two years, that was a neat bit of deflection of attention away from a lot of players (and bowlers) in that side who have not won a match, and also from the head coach within whose ambit results also fall.

    Then a mesh of reasons alluding to his fitness, accusing him of a questionable "work ethic around training" and an assertion that he is doing "just the bare minimum" away from the field. It is true Wahab's fitness scores have fallen recently, but on its own, his latest score is still deemed an official passing mark.

    And fitness is a more nuanced state than can be captured by one simple measure. There is bowling fitness, and nobody has yet suggested that on the field with ball in hand, Wahab is unfit. Who would, of a man who can maintain high pace in the 40-degree heat of a Dubai afternoon over nine overs? Or even, more recently, a nine-over spell through a hot Dubai evening and blazing morning?

    Even Arthur admitted he couldn't fault Wahab with ball in hand, which, in a radical interpretation, should perhaps be the primary way a coach relates to his player.

    Maybe Wahab's buy-in to Arthur's high-performance culture hasn't been enthusiastic enough. People talk of a separate training regime in the off season and the occasional dietary indulgence. On the latter front, observationally it would appear that the buy-in from, say, Pakistan's captain has not been great either.

    But even if there had been convincing reasons, it's not a great look, this public shaming, especially if it is to be believed that Arthur hadn't spoken to Wahab about it (at least until the dropping). If it is meant to be some kind of motivational coaching reverse psychology, it's coming across as unnecessary and a little vindictive.

    It is threatening to become a pattern because it has happened before.

    And, Australians may chime in, before that too.

    http://kwese.espn.com/cricket/story/_/id/23195553/was-mickey-arthur-right-drop-wahab-riaz
     

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